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  Pot Considered 'Murder Weed' in 1937
Posted by CN Staff on November 05, 2005 at 07:12:12 PT
By James B. Meadow, Rocky Mountain News 
Source: Rocky Mountain News 

cannabis Denver, Colorado -- On Oct. 2, 1937, in the somewhat shady Lexington Apartments at 1200 California St. in Denver, Samuel R. Caldwell became the first person in the United States to be arrested on a marijuana charge. Caldwell, a 58-year-old unemployed laborer moonlighting as a dealer, was nailed by the FBI and Denver police for peddling two marijuana cigarettes to one Moses Baca, 26.

If you're wondering why it took the U.S. government so long to bust a pot dealer, it's because until the Marijuana Stamp Act was passed - on you guessed it, Oct. 2, 1937 - cannabis wasn't illegal.

Certainly, it had been vilified in newspapers with headlines such as "Murder Weed Found Up and Down Coast: Deadly Marijuana Plant Ready for Harvest That Means Enslavement of California Children."

Neither was it deemed as some benign recreational drug by the nation's law enforcement hierarchy.

Harry J. Anslinger, for example, commissioner of the Federal Bureau of Narcotics, was a vociferous foe of cannabis. In his book, Assassin of Youth, he labeled marijuana "dangerous as a coiled rattlesnake," and anguished, "How many murders, suicides, robberies, criminal assaults, holdups, burglaries, and deeds of maniacal insanity it causes each year, especially among the young, can be only conjectured."

Indeed. Texas cops insisted that because it fueled a "lust for blood" and imbued its imbibers with "superhuman strength," pot was the catalyst for unspeakably violent crimes.

Anslinger and many others would have dismissed the possibility that, 68 years later, Denver's law-abiding citizens would vote to decriminalize the possession of an ounce-or-less of marijuana as nothing more than a pipe dream.

Much more real was the racism that anchored some of the original hysteria surrounding cannabis. At least that's a contention of John C. McWilliams, a professor of history at Penn State University specializing in 20th century social-political American history and drug policy, who has written a book on Anslinger.

"Marijuana was associated with black jazz musicians and Mexicans in border towns - clearly racist stuff," said McWilliams, who says Anslinger's files are chock full of letters linking marijuana and minorities.

In fact, he cites part of a 1936 correspondence from Floyd Baskett, editor of the Daily Courier in Alamosa.

"I wish I could show you what a small marijuana cigarette does to one of our degenerate, Spanish-speaking residents," Baskett wrote to Anslinger.

Certainly District Judge J. Foster Symes didn't need convincing about the nefarious effects of the "murder weed." In a dizzying swirl of law enforcement, Caldwell and Baca were busted on a Wednesday night, indicted on Thursday (they pleaded guilty) and sentenced on Friday.

"I consider marijuana the worst of all narcotics, far worse than the use of morphine or cocaine," thundered Symes from the bench. "Under its influence, men become beasts, just as was the case with Moses Baca . . .

"Marijuana destroys life itself. I have no sympathy with those who sell this weed. I will impose the heaviest penalties. The government is going to enforce this new law to the letter."

Then Symes backed up his tough talk by sentencing Caldwell to four years' hard labor at Kansas' mighty Leavenworth Prison.

And just to show Caldwell he was no softy, Symes tacked on the astronomical fine of $1,000.

However, Baca, beast though he may have become, got off relatively easy. Maybe Symes' wrath had been sated somewhat: he sentenced the married father of three to a mere 18 months in prison.

And if you're thinking there was any plea bargaining or reduced time for good behavior, both men served every single day of their sentence. Although history is unclear about what happened to Baca, Caldwell died a year after he was released from prison.

So great was the government's indignation over marijuana that it didn't seem to matter that, as McWilliams points out, "Marijuana is not even a narcotic."

And so, today, as proponents of Denver's Initiative 100 celebrate, it seems only fitting that they should perhaps pause, take a deep breath, and reflect upon the sad saga of Sam Caldwell.

Note: Offenders got more than token citations in Denver.

Source: Denver Rocky Mountain News (CO)
Author: James B. Meadow, Rocky Mountain News
Published: November 5, 2005
Copyright: 2005 Denver Publishing Co.
Contact: letters@rockymountainnews.com
Website: http://www.rockymountainnews.com/

Related Articles & Web Site:

Safer Choice
http://www.saferchoice.org/

Pot Vote Prompts Worldwide Attention
http://cannabisnews.com/news/thread21268.shtml

Denver Is First City To Legalize Pot
http://cannabisnews.com/news/thread21260.shtml

To Voters, Issue was Freedom of Choice
http://cannabisnews.com/news/thread21257.shtml


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Comment #97 posted by FoM on November 07, 2005 at 17:14:07 PT
Jim
I believe many of the people who were at Woodstock are business men and women. I believe that the culture itself is responsible for the natural food industry. My son's hospice nurse was at Woodstock and we had a little time to talk about it and she just beamed when she reflected. I believe that enviornmental people came from that time too.

[ Post Comment ]
 
Comment #96 posted by Jim Lunsford on November 07, 2005 at 17:07:50 PT
Re: Woodstock
Moreover, I wonder how many of those people, and the thousands who couldn't make it (though they still lived that spirit), are now the ceo's, state politicians, our entire societal structure? I bet quite a few. Perhaps we need to learn to trust each other a little bit more.

A common theme in the New Testament, and Buddhism, is one of redemption of your past. That no longer matters when you are no longer that same person. We resist that trust in a Universal and loving God, which is present in all of us.

Though the definition of this God is different in incredible ways, who can put the totality of all into words? In the New Testament, Buddhism, and in the Greek Mythologies, there is hope. Cannabis will be legal as soon as we learn to forgive each other and trust one another to strive to do better. And to forgive the actions of the "enemies" of our past. Perhaps at such a time as we learn to understand each other, rather than hate, we will deserve a truly compassionate revolution.

On the other hand, we can make Cannabis the new oil and big brother complex. How we judge others is how we judge ourselves. I believe that this God sense protects us and helps us as much as we will allow us to be helped. And, that goes for everyone else as well.

We are still reeling from the flow of information coming at us through the internet. Societies go through paradigm shifts as well. The last one we really noted, the Industrial Revolution, was just another shift in societal thinking. We have the potential to truly end the dark ages, if we just trust that sense of perfect love under everything in life. At least, that’s my spiritual belief. Nevertheless, everyone is really the pastor of their own religion. And yet one God.

Sorry for the sermon, but I AM an ordained minister! So, what did you expect? :) Peace and love to all, Rev Jim

Rev Jim Lunsford

First Cannabist Church

Your greatest weapon is in your worst enemies' mind: This old ninja quote from my nephew. Thought it appropriate.



[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #95 posted by global_warming on November 07, 2005 at 16:24:27 PT
Good Night
Have to go and Dream

[ Post Comment ]
 
Comment #94 posted by FoM on November 07, 2005 at 16:13:08 PT
global_warming
Now you get an Amen.

[ Post Comment ]
 
Comment #93 posted by global_warming on November 07, 2005 at 16:06:51 PT
re:Bravo
There is still too many human beings in prisons for Cannabis.

God, Let us end this war on people.

There are so many more important issues in our lives,

Our collective relationships with our Gods

Our Spiritualities

That Unknown Resting place

Be certain how you cast your next vote

peace

[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #92 posted by FoM on November 07, 2005 at 15:55:36 PT
global_warming
All I can say is Bravo!

[ Post Comment ]
 
Comment #91 posted by global_warming on November 07, 2005 at 15:43:51 PT
re:statement
It was bold and unprecedented, never in this US democracy or perhaps in any other country on this planets history, have so many human beings gathered, and come together, to celebrate that new day, where drugs, and aspirin, viox and science was challenged, where the people affirmed, in protest and common understanding, we are the people, we shall not be ruled by bullshit and the phony crap of big business.



[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #90 posted by FoM on November 07, 2005 at 15:30:53 PT
global_warming
It must have been a sight to behold all that traffic with like minded people heading for one place to enjoy life and make a statement.

[ Post Comment ]
 
Comment #89 posted by global_warming on November 07, 2005 at 15:20:41 PT
I recollect
The drive up to Yasgars Farm, imagine, both North and South bound roads (and the shoulders') "filled" with every imaginable trucks, vans, "all" heading to Woodstock..



[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #88 posted by FoM on November 07, 2005 at 15:07:53 PT
global_warming
That is very cool. We have the DVD of Woodstock and it really is good. I was married with a small child and was far removed from the culture ( my husband at that time absolutely hated hippies) but I always thought it was an event that would never be forgotten and it hasn't been.

[ Post Comment ]
 
Comment #87 posted by global_warming on November 07, 2005 at 15:03:31 PT
Don't recall
Meeting Niel, met a lot of good people, never got close enough to the stage to hear music, I remember the Hog Farm, they were giving hot and tasty rice dishes.



[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #86 posted by FoM on November 07, 2005 at 14:52:55 PT
global_warming
You went to Woodstock 69? Really? If so wow. You should know who Neil Young is since he was a part of CSNY during that time even though I don't think he performed at Woodstock. They were splitting up I think.

[ Post Comment ]
 
Comment #85 posted by global_warming on November 07, 2005 at 14:52:29 PT
re:comment 76
"..a coffee shop in Denver, where Sam lost his freedom over a cigarette.."

This is Ground Zero, where this disease, virus, or mental disorder was first witnessed" surely, that day which festers in our American History should be remembered.



[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #84 posted by global_warming on November 07, 2005 at 14:42:57 PT
Woodstock
I was there,

[ Post Comment ]
 
Comment #83 posted by FoM on November 07, 2005 at 08:57:38 PT
Dankhank
I didn't go to Woodstock either but just loved the free spirit Woodstock generated. Thank you for the link. That must have been almost a year after Woodstock.

[ Post Comment ]
 
Comment #82 posted by Dankhank on November 07, 2005 at 08:54:30 PT
Woodstock
Thanks, I enjoy remembering that time ...

I missed it but made the 2nd Annual International Atlanta Pop Festival, an equally Stupendous event. I probably have provided this link before, but here it is, again.

http://www.me.umn.edu/~kgeisler/700704.html



[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #81 posted by FoM on November 07, 2005 at 08:38:07 PT
Dankhank
I found this short clip of Woodstock and thought you and others might like to see it.

This Day In History: The Woodstock Festival

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-6896360187558639311&q=joan+baez

[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #80 posted by siege on November 07, 2005 at 08:07:03 PT
O T wake up call
Rioting Spreads to 300 Towns in France

http://www.newsok.com/article/1660587/?template=home/main



[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #79 posted by siege on November 07, 2005 at 07:37:31 PT
O T Antiwar Sermon Brings IRS Warning
Owens said that an IRS audit team had recently offered the church a settlement during a face-to-face meeting.

"They said if there was a confession of wrongdoing, they would not proceed to the exam stage. They would be willing not to revoke tax-exempt status if the church admitted intervening in an election."

http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-allsaints7nov07,0,6769876.story

[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #78 posted by siege on November 07, 2005 at 04:56:47 PT
bureaucratic arrogance
http://www.newswithviews.com/Dean/carolyn19.htm

Another censorship project between 1994 and 2000 prevented companies that sell omega-3 fatty acids found in fish oils from telling us that using that supplement could prevent sudden death heart attacks. As a result, 1.8 million people died during that same period of time. In short, the FDA is responsible for 1.8 million people dying unnecessarily because of bureaucratic arrogance.

http://www.stopfdacensorship.org/

Action Alert: Stop FDA Censorship Support the Health Freedom Protection Act

http://capwiz.com/liberty/issues/alert/?alertid=8194951&type=CO =================================================================

I see it this way CANNABIS will be illegal if Republican is voted into office this next time around 2008, and if a Democrats or Independent is voted into office CANNABIS will be LEGAL! for everyone...

[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #77 posted by Jim Lunsford on November 07, 2005 at 04:17:15 PT
Does it seem?
To anyone else, that perhaps the reason we are not in the streets rioting about the war, environment, drugs, etc., is because this government is no longer relevant to the people? Even to the people in the government itself? For example: if government were truly relevant to the people’s needs/wants, wouldn’t everyone here be under arrest for what all we post?

Not that anything we say is illegal, but if the government’s stand were the people’s stand, all talk of legalizing Cannabis would be dealt with even more harshly. I am certainly not that difficult of a person to find, and it would be hard to not find me guilty of use. Not that it is something I seek, but being arrested doesn’t really concern me very much.

Perhaps that is why the Downing Street Memo wasn’t a true smoking gun, and all of the controversy we find in the war investigations hasn’t sparked riots across America. Government simply isn’t relevant to the people’s needs on a day-to-day basis. Perhaps soon, the phrase “re-inventing government” will have a new meaning. Peace, Rev. Jim

Rev Jim Lunsford

First Cannabist Church

Government: Perhaps it should be used to help one another get through the day. Not imprison each other

[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #76 posted by Hope on November 06, 2005 at 22:04:51 PT
Sam Caldwell and Denver
Maybe a coffee shop in Denver, where Sam lost his freedom over a cigarette, called "This One's for Sam". Or "Old Sam Caldwell's Cannabis Cafe".

A sad possibility just came to me. Sam and Moses never did even have any cannabis ...they were handy and vulnerable for a set-up...to "send a message"...to be used as an "example", by the powers that were.

[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #75 posted by FoM on November 06, 2005 at 20:11:42 PT
Dankhank
Thank you for the heads up. I missed it. I am watching F/9-11 on Showtime right now. I haven't watched it for quite a while. We're still there! I hope we bring our troops home soon. No more war.

[ Post Comment ]
 
Comment #74 posted by Dankhank on November 06, 2005 at 19:58:30 PT
Boondocks
on Comedy Central now

[ Post Comment ]
 
Comment #73 posted by Jim Lunsford on November 06, 2005 at 17:34:05 PT
Apologies, just one more note
That paper, the Christian Scientist, just added (at least on the front page of the internet edition) an ethical investing column. I hardily recommend it to anyone who wants to see another glimmer of hope in the wonders of the chaos of change!

Rev Jim Lunsford

First Cannabist Church

Death: A full life has only one of these. And it's at the end, so what's it matter anyway?

[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #72 posted by Jim Lunsford on November 06, 2005 at 17:25:53 PT
FoM
I liked that, and you're right as well, I do have to, if I desire contentment! lol

There is good news out there folks! Market forces are on our side, as is the Christian Scientist. The green movement is forcing markets to begin competing on a environmental level. Here is an excerpt:

So stock markets regulate firms?

I want to be clear here. Regulation is the job of government. It is the proper province of government, and it should not pull back from regulation in certain and essential areas. You do not want product safety in the hands of the marketplace or worker safety in the hands of the marketplace. However, there are a variety of issues where feedback from society is very important for corporations, and the additional data you give to consumers and investors can help force corporations to compete. So the marketplace is forcing them to compete on social and environmental issues the way they had competed in the past on price, on innovation, on efficiency. The fundamental change is that I think we are headed toward asking corporations to compete on social and environmental issues.

And the rest of the article ain't too shabby either!

Here's the link for those of you who like it. What we buy, and what we desire is reflected in life in the form of market forces. And, since most of us are part of some form of corporation, there are people just like us trying to serve the market. They also know to always follow the money. And that would be whatever you spend YOUR money on. Like as much hemp (of industrial, medicinal, and spiritual) as you can buy, is going to force the market to produce the demand. Your dollar is the real vote now.

Rev. Jim Lunsford

First Cannabist Church

Prisons should be viewed as a failure of society, and a place to which citizens can be protected from their own actions, until we can find out how we failed them.

http://www.csmonitor.com/2005/1107/p15s01-wmgn.html

[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #71 posted by FoM on November 06, 2005 at 17:09:07 PT
Jim I Like That
You have to learn that you control your emotional response to a situation, the situation does not control your emotions.

[ Post Comment ]
 
Comment #70 posted by Jim Lunsford on November 06, 2005 at 16:59:43 PT
Craving
Of course being content, having faith in Providence, is decidedly a lack of craving.

I liked that, but I'm a bit too baked to remember who just wrote that. I think it was Hope. Thanks, Jim

Everything changes. It has a beginning and an end. When we have something we enjoy, we also suffer because we know it will end. So, instead of focusing on the joy of what we have now, we focus on the loss of that pleasure.

To end craving, all you need to do is to be content with what you have, while you have it, and then with whatever comes after that. And of course, you have to learn that you control your emotional response to a situation, the situation does not control your emotions. At least thats a step. That is, if there are any steps! Peace, Jim

Oh yeah, thanks everyone for all the cool new links to explore! It's so much fun, I never know what I'll find there! Jim

Rev Jim Lunsford

First Cannabist Church

Possibilities make Gods of all of us

[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #69 posted by FoM on November 06, 2005 at 16:09:05 PT
Sukoi
Thank you. We got company so I turned the TV off and wouldn't have seen it anyway. Maybe it will be on another day. That would be nice.

[ Post Comment ]
 
Comment #68 posted by FoM on November 06, 2005 at 15:59:16 PT
Hope
I'm glad you are getting to see it. It's remarkable because of safety sake that the reporters had the nerve to live in the middle of it all and do such a fine job of putting it together for us to see. I bet Off To War wins some award for something.

[ Post Comment ]
 
Comment #67 posted by Hope on November 06, 2005 at 15:39:54 PT
comment 66
GW, did you do that on purpose?

There are 66 books in the Old and New Testament. Of course there are lots of other writings that were left out, like Enoch, but that's cool that your scripture recitation landed on 66.

FoM, I'm watching Off to War on the Discovery Channel.

[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #66 posted by global_warming on November 06, 2005 at 14:54:51 PT
Surely
Surely goodness and mercy shall follow me all the days of my life: and I will dwell in the house of the LORD for ever.



[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #65 posted by lombar on November 06, 2005 at 14:26:16 PT
comment #46 - On craving
Craving

tanha

The definition

"There are these three cravings. Which three? Craving for sensuality, craving for becoming, craving for non-becoming. These are the three cravings."

— Iti 58

§ 58. {Iti III.9; Iti 50}

This was said by the Blessed One, said by the Arahant, so I have heard: "There are these three cravings. Which three? Craving for sensuality, craving for becoming, craving for non-becoming. These are the three cravings."

Bound with the bondage of craving, their minds smitten with becoming & non-, they are bound with the bondage of Mara -- people with no safety from bondage, beings going through the wandering-on, headed for birth & death.

While those who've abandoned craving, free from the craving for becoming & non-, reaching the ending of fermentations, though in the world, have gone beyond.

An arrow in the heart

"Craving is... an arrow. The poison of ignorance spreads its toxin through desire, passion, & ill will."

— MN 105 (http://accesstoinsight.org/canon/sutta/majjhima/mn-105-tb0.html#arrow)

What traps us in samsara

"Monks, I don't envision even one other fetter — fettered by which beings conjoined go wandering and transmigrating on for a long, long time — like the fetter of craving. Fettered with the fetter of craving, beings conjoined go wandering and transmigrating on for a long, long time."

— Iti 15

Do I desire cannabis or crave it?

There is a difference between an ordained monk and a lay-follower. I am not about to support setting the laws of the land at the level of discipline of a monk for bodily purity while being subjected to so much non-virtue in the form of deception(pollution, war, growing poverty...) from the state and the corporations. If there is no temptation then how can one ever learn to refuse it? Also I believe cannabis must be separated from other drugs because it does not destroy mindfulness like alcohol, or induce physical cravings like alcohol, cocaine, herion, meth, nicotine, (coffee :)). The craving if there is one is for pleasure and reduction of other suffering. Thus it is craving for sensuality for recreation and not being the 'buddha' or a Noble One, a wearer of the saffron robes, I do not think I have overcome all craving and become an arahant...but I can live with that!(and live with that.) ;) I certainly will not hold people in general to that high a standard!!!

I have been reading and studying accesstoinsight.org for years and to see such a simple synopsis just does not do justice to the breadth of the ideas that were taught ~2500 years ago...

Of course being content, having faith in Providence, is decidedly a lack of craving.

Psalm 23

1The LORD is my shepherd; I shall not want. 2He maketh me to lie down in green pastures: he leadeth me beside the still waters. 3He restoreth my soul: he leadeth me in the paths of righteousness for his name's sake. 4Yea, though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death, I will fear no evil: for thou art with me; thy rod and thy staff they comfort me. 5Thou preparest a table before me in the presence of mine enemies: thou anointest my head with oil; my cup runneth over. 6Surely goodness and mercy shall follow me all the days of my life: and I will dwell in the house of the LORD for ever.

[ Post Comment ]
 
Comment #64 posted by global_warming on November 06, 2005 at 13:34:42 PT
ot-old religion
This one is for the Rev. James,

http://www.vanguardngr.com/articles/2002/features/arts/at430102005.html

"the stone writings of Ikom were deciphered by Acholonu, and Prabhakar and were found to contain an entire scripture in our solar system. This was the very first scripture of humanity! The researchers discovered that the writings were a combination of ancient Egyptian, Sumerian and Davidian letters. Evidence abounds in the work of the two researchers to prove that the Ikom stone writings were the original source-book of the ancient Sumerian epic of creation, Euuma Ellsh, dated 6000 B.C. (the original source of Genesis) and of The book of the Secrets of Enoch;.."

In the meantime, -- Police say nothing will change if a controversial medical marijuana measure passes in Tuesday's election, since marijuana use remains illegal under state and federal laws,..

http://www.currentconcerns.ch/archive/2005/06/20050601.php



[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #63 posted by Sukoi on November 06, 2005 at 13:13:59 PT
FoM
I guess that it got bumped due to the tornado and France coverage. Damn, I was looking forward to seeing it... oh well...

[ Post Comment ]
 
Comment #62 posted by FoM on November 06, 2005 at 11:59:56 PT
siege
I understand what you mean.

[ Post Comment ]
 
Comment #61 posted by FoM on November 06, 2005 at 11:55:54 PT
Sukoi
Thank you. I turned on Fox and hope to catch it.

[ Post Comment ]
 
Comment #60 posted by siege on November 06, 2005 at 11:50:44 PT
Rimonabant
Focus on the brain's so-called "pleasure centers" have led to research into dopamine neurons, which deliver powerful feelings of well-being.

The human body has to have so much ( fear and pleasure ) to keep a good balance. they mess this up, then you go on to Prozac or something like this.

[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #59 posted by siege on November 06, 2005 at 11:44:23 PT
Bush's Plan!!
This will make you the perfect slave for the government...

[ Post Comment ]
 
Comment #58 posted by Hope on November 06, 2005 at 11:31:26 PT
Antagonist and Agonist
Antagonist: 1 : one that contends with or opposes another : ADVERSARY, OPPONENT 2 : an agent of physiological antagonism : as a : a muscle that contracts with and limits the action of an agonist with which it is paired -- called also antagonistic muscle b : a chemical that acts within the body to reduce the physiological activity of another chemical substance (as an opiate); especially : a chemical that acts within the body to reduce the physiological activity of another chemical substance (as an opiate); especially : one that opposes the action on the nervous system of a drug or a substance occurring naturally in the body by combining with and blocking its nervous receptor.

The relavent definition in this case: one that opposes the action on the nervous system of a drug or a substance occurring naturally in the body by combining with and blocking its nervous receptor.

Agonist: 1 : one that is engaged in a struggle 2 [from antagonist] a : a muscle that is controlled by the action of an antagonist with which it is paired b : a chemical substance capable of combining with a receptor on a cell and initiating a reaction or activity.

The relevant definition in this case: a chemical substance capable of combining with a receptor on a cell and initiating a reaction or activity.

So that means...what?

[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #57 posted by Sukoi on November 06, 2005 at 11:29:52 PT
Ot: SAFER Director...
Mason Tvert told me that he will be on the FOX News channel at 2:15 Central Time.

[ Post Comment ]
 
Comment #56 posted by FoM on November 06, 2005 at 10:36:27 PT
One More Comment
I believe that cannabis, hashish won't stop a person from feeling pain, love, joy, loss etc. but it helps a person to deal with those emotions in a thoughtful and calmer way. Drugs to me are different. Particularly those for mood enhancement. I took Prozac for a few months and that is my thoughts about why some of these drugs won't work for everyone.

[ Post Comment ]
 
Comment #55 posted by FoM on November 06, 2005 at 10:21:48 PT
The Article OnThe Dalai Lama
This sentence below makes sense to me. How can we ever achieve any form a Wisdom in life if we don't feel joy, pain, hope, loss etc.?

***

"The drug suppressing craving could stop you from developing the wisdom to understand and move on from craving," he said to loud applause from the audience.

http://www.insidebayarea.com/trivalleyherald/localnews/ci_3189230

[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #54 posted by runderwo on November 06, 2005 at 10:14:21 PT
nice
So if you "antagonize" the cannabis receptors (either by permanently damaging them, or by temporarily occupying them with something useless), where then does anadamide, the body's natural source of 'bliss' attach to?

The cure may be worse than the disease in the case of trying to cure cannabis 'addiction'.

[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #53 posted by FoM on November 06, 2005 at 09:51:44 PT
Hope
I'll give it a try. It would be a drug that takes away the pleasure sensor in our brains. To me that means we would be walking zombies. Unfeeling, without desire, without passion etc.

It could help people who over eat, use tobacco, use alcohol, use drugs but at what price? I could be wrong but that's what I think.

[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #52 posted by Hope on November 06, 2005 at 09:41:31 PT
E_Johnson or anyone?
"The first drug to target craving is already in development. Called Rimonabant, it antagonizes the receptors that marijuana works on and can stop craving, Fields said."

I realize that "antagonizes" in this case is a scientific term. What does it mean?

It doesn't sound like a good idea to "antagonize" any part of the body...but especially important parts of the central nervous system, which I think...I could be wrong, that those "receptors" are a part of.

[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #51 posted by Hope on November 06, 2005 at 09:33:20 PT
Oh yeah...
I forgot...they're willing to kill people to push their agenda. It's sickening to be forced to support their activities.

[ Post Comment ]
 
Comment #50 posted by FoM on November 06, 2005 at 09:33:11 PT
About The Commercial
If it is the same one I saw a while ago it was about inhalants.

[ Post Comment ]
 
Comment #49 posted by Hope on November 06, 2005 at 09:29:50 PT
Where's PETA when you need them?
Surely they didn't really kill those pet fish for a stupid...a really stupid, commercial.

The personalities of some fish I've kept have been astounding. Especially the last one, a Beta. He really paid attention to what he could see through his bowl. He really would "wave" back at you when you waved at him. He really seemed to enjoy music. It was amazing and disturbing at the same time.

It's disturbing to think they might have killed anything for such a stupid commercial, but especially vulnerable pet type creatures.

[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #48 posted by FoM on November 06, 2005 at 08:17:29 PT
Patrick
I think I've seen that commercial before. I don't know where or why they come up with this stuff.

[ Post Comment ]
 
Comment #47 posted by Patrick on November 06, 2005 at 08:08:06 PT
Sick anti commercial
I saw a very despicable commercial during one of the football games yesterday.

You see a tank of water with quite a few goldfish that are swimming against a plain white background. At the bottom of the tank was a valve to let the water out and right away a hand turns the valve. Naturally the fish panic as the water eventually drains completely obviously killing the fish. The message, this is what life is like when you on drugs. They didn’t name any specific drug but they killed the fish mercilessly. I am sure any children who watched it probably freaked out. I had goldfish in my tank for nearly six years before they died. But that is beside the point. These anti’s are really sick bastards. Maybe they could have gotten their point across better if they actually put humans in a big clear tank and pumped in cyanide gas killing them and then telling us how wonderful life is without drugs. Apologies if this commercial has already been pointed out on another thread.

[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #46 posted by FoM on November 06, 2005 at 08:05:40 PT
Interesting Article About The Dalai Lama
Excerpt: The brain remains a mystery, yet scientists are beginning to unravel how it works — new revelations that clearly intrigue the Dalai Lama, who won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1989.

One area neuroscientists are studying is craving and addiction. Understanding how we become addicted to alcohol, drugs, nicotine and even food can lead to cures to our most pervasive social ills, including obesity and alcoholism.

Focus on the brain's so-called "pleasure centers" have led to research into dopamine neurons, which deliver powerful feelings of well-being.

"We're beginning to understand the chemical ways to reduce craving," said Dr. Howard Fields, director of the Wheeler Center for the Neurobiology of Addiction at the University of California, San Francisco.

The first drug to target craving is already in development. Called Rimonabant, it antagonizes the receptors that marijuana works on and can stop craving, Fields said.

Giving people this drug can stop them from smoking and cause them to lose weight, Fields said, eliciting audible gasps from the Stanford audience.

"I ask His Holiness, Is this really a good approach?" Fields said.

The Dalai Lama replied that much depends on how you define craving.

In Buddhist teachings, desire is not the same as craving. For instance, Buddha had a desire to alleviate the world's suffering, which was not a bad desire to have. Cravings, however, for drugs, food, wealth, power, recognition or even other people, is a falsification, a misinterpretation of reality. Such cravings lead to less understanding of self and keep the person locked in a cycle of suffering.

"It's based on ignorance," the Dalai Lama explained.

The Dalai Lama asked if a drug could be created to kill all cravings.

Fields replied that such a drug would likely "create a state of coma."

"That's a disaster," the Dalai Lama said, laughing.

Fields agreed, adding "it would be the opposite of awakening."

Even so, the basic philosophy of Buddhism goes against a drug to kill craving, said Alan Wallace, founder and president of the Santa Barbara Institute for Consciousness Studies.

"The drug suppressing craving could stop you from developing the wisdom to understand and move on from craving," he said to loud applause from the audience.

http://www.insidebayarea.com/trivalleyherald/localnews/ci_3189230

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Comment #45 posted by FoM on November 06, 2005 at 07:57:38 PT
Off Topic Canada: Cannabis Oil Coming
By Doug Beazley

November 6, 2005

Coming to a pharmacy near you: a bong in a bottle.

Just kidding. Actually, the Med-Marijuana line of herbal remedies contains so little of the psychoactive ingredient found in weed, you could down a whole bottle without feeling the slightest buzz.

"You can take this stuff till hell freezes over and you're not going to get a minute of euphoria," said Bob Martin, a Calgary life insurance salesman who recently got the rights to distribute the hemp-derived remedies in southern Alberta. He said he hopes to start selling the products in Edmonton soon.

"Health Canada's rules for (over-the-counter products) made from marijuana specify they must have less than 10 parts per million of THC, the psychoactive ingredient. Our product has something like 1.5 to two parts per million."

While it won't get you high, Martin claims Med-Marijuana cannabis oil tablets will help with the rheumatism.

The company hasn't commissioned any product-specific studies on the effects of Med-Marijuana. Martin insists nutritionists have been praising the nutritional value of cannabis seeds "for years."

"You could live on cannabis seeds and water," he said. "It has an amazing effect on arthritis pain. My wife has bad arthritis - she started taking the product and became pain-free in a matter of days."

One expert in herbal remedies backs up Martin's claim. Paul Saunders of the Canadian College of Naturopathic Medicine said hemp oil contains high amounts of omega 6, a natural anti-inflammatory.

"So it has the potential to help with joint pain," he said. "I haven't seen the product out here in conservative Ontario, and I don't know why it's being sold as 'Med-Marijuana' when there's practically no active ingredient in it.

"Perhaps it's a marketing attempt to flaunt the link with actual medical marijuana, which does have health benefits."

"Essentially, the name of the product isn't incorrect," said Health Canada spokesman Christopher Williams. "The name 'hemp oil' would be more accurate, though."

Martin said the product will be available in all 19 Super Drug Mart outlets in Calgary this week. He didn't know when it might be available in Edmonton.

Copyright: 2005, Canoe Inc.

http://www.edmontonsun.com/News/Canada/2005/11/06/1294964-sun.html

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Comment #44 posted by FoM on November 06, 2005 at 07:43:14 PT
potpal
Thank you very much. That was very nice.

[ Post Comment ]
 
Comment #43 posted by potpal on November 06, 2005 at 05:10:31 PT
Hempy Birthday to you...and a...
Happy Birthday to you!

Listen to link...;-)

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Comment #41 posted by FoM on November 05, 2005 at 20:02:40 PT
Hope
First I'm glad you liked the picture.

They are still over there and they are following the same families that were in the first episode. Tonights episode was Thanksgiving 2004. They have started showing new episodes every Saturday at 10 but I don't know how many more will be shown. It's worth watching. It shows the war, the families, the political beliefs. It's very good.

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Comment #40 posted by Hope on November 05, 2005 at 19:44:04 PT
That series you mention, FoM
Off to War. That's the Arkansas National Guard bunch that was sent...isn't it? I saw the first one but haven't seen any since. I saw a clip of the one where the turkey farmer, I think it was, came back all busted up. I guess some more have been hurt or worse. I meant to keep up with it. Are they all back home now?

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Comment #39 posted by Hope on November 05, 2005 at 19:32:00 PT
FoM comment 31
Oh...she's so radiant. So beautiful. That is definitely one of those "megawatt smiles" you hear about. Thanks. A smile like that is kind of contagious...which is good.

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Comment #38 posted by ekim on November 05, 2005 at 19:20:51 PT
back to work
Date Event Time Speaker City State/Prov Country click on titles to sort - click again to reverse order November 2005 Nov 7 05 Criminal Justice Survey Course 07:00 PM Norm Stamper San Diego California USA No doubt that if one surveyed the college campuses in regards to America's war on drugs, one would fine that most students and faculty believe it is an absolute failure. When Speaker Norm Stamper speaks to the Criminal Justice Survey Course at San Diego State University about the failures of drug prohibition, belief will be changed into actual knowledge. Norm will discuss issues such as the racial bias of the current legal system, the failures of mandatory minimum sentencing and a host of other legal and societal drug prohibition issues. Nov 8 05 San Diego State University, Faculty Reception 05:30 PM Norm Stamper San Diego California USA LEAP Speaker and former Seattle, Washington Chief of Police, Norm Stamper, meets with faculty and administration of San Diego State University. Norm is on campus to talk to students and faculty about the failures associated with America's war on drugs. Nov 8 05 Graduate School Seminar 11:00 AM Norm Stamper San Diego California USA LEAP Speaker Norm Stamper will speak at the Graduate School Seminar of San Diego State University. Norm's experience as a former Chief of Police of Seattle and auhor of an extraordinary new book, "Breaking Rank", in which Norm states "tens of thousands of otherwise innocent Americans incarcerated, many for 20 years, some for life; families ripped apart; drug traffickers and blameless bystanders shot dead on city streets; narcotics officers assassinated here and abroad, with prosecutors, judges, and elected officials in Latin America gunned down for their courageous stands against the cartels; and all those dollars spent on federal, state, and local cops, courts, prosecutors, prisons, probation, parole, and pee-in-the-bottle programs. Even federal aid to bribe distant nations to stop feeding our habit." Add to this that the war on drugs costs the United States more than 69 billion dollars each year

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Comment #37 posted by FoM on November 05, 2005 at 19:16:09 PT
ekim
Thank you so much. I really think the world of everyone here.

Right now we are watching a series on the Discovery-Times Channel called Off To War. Ever since the first episode in this series we have been interested in it. I recommend watching this series if you can.



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Comment #36 posted by ekim on November 05, 2005 at 19:11:24 PT
^^^^^-^^^^^-^^^%%%%%%%%%%%^^^^^-^^^^^-
happy b day to you FoM thanks for caring.

i have felt good about this space since the first time i typed cannabisnews into the machine. its alive-- wondrous place -- you have nurtured.

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Comment #35 posted by Jim Lunsford on November 05, 2005 at 18:53:34 PT
BGreen
One of the reasons I am interested in the supreme court case is that one could argue it is a choice between God and law. I hope to write a letter soon which draws the parrallel between this case and an incident some 2000 years ago, when we had a very similar case.

Rev Jim Lunsford

First Cannabist Church

Everyone is the pastor of their own religion

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Comment #34 posted by FoM on November 05, 2005 at 17:20:13 PT
BGreen
I don't know much about the religious defense since none of the churches I ever went to would use Cannabis as a Sacrament. Peyote has been used in certain religions for a long time and that might make a difference. I just don't know but it would be worth checking deeper into if you feel you should.

Thanks global_warming.

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Comment #33 posted by global_warming on November 05, 2005 at 16:40:50 PT
That is a very happy women
I do Hope

That she has found

Peace



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Comment #32 posted by BGreen on November 05, 2005 at 16:38:33 PT
Native dancer says pot was for ceremony
Native dancer says pot was for ceremony

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

VANCOUVER, B.C. -- A native dancer, who was one of seven people charged with smuggling more than 182 pounds of marijuana across the U.S.-Canadian border, said the drug was to be used for religious purposes, U.S. border guards said.

Ranger Oppenheim, driver of one of the two motor homes stopped at the border into Sumas on Sunday, told authorities he knew the marijuana was in the motor home, said court papers filed in U.S. District Court in Seattle.

Oppenheim said he was on his way to a peyote ceremony at the Lummi Indian Reservation. He told the border guard that the marijuana was to be used at a ceremony where peyote was being used for religious purposes, the complaint said.

------------------------------------------------------------

This portrays how stupid it is to allow religious use of one controlled substance (peyote) while denying the religious use of another (cannabis.)

It's a clear affront to our religious freedom if the courts get to determine the legitimacy of our religious sacraments.

There is no reason for this discrepancy, and maybe this case will be the catalyst to allow the legal, religious use of cannabis in the USA.

The Reverend Bud Green

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Comment #31 posted by FoM on November 05, 2005 at 16:00:24 PT
Off Topic: Hope Check This Out
I am working on my sister's page. She is a Videographer and does Weddings. I have many pretty bride pictures to use and I thought this one was very nice.

Guys just ignore. LOL!

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Comment #30 posted by siege on November 05, 2005 at 15:44:57 PT
Should Canada loosen laws.
"Legalization means more money for the government, employment for the masses. . .and a bunch of much more agreeable neighbours"

http://www.macleans.ca/switchboard/article.jsp?content=20051107_114858_114858

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Comment #29 posted by global_warming on November 05, 2005 at 15:27:55 PT
Can We Change
The laws against Cannabis?

Can WE end domestic violence?

Free Enterprise and global capitalism

Is having a soured tit

Indenture or slavery

Serves only the rich

There are so many poor

We all can agree

This world

Our World

Can invest

To build

A Future

That can embrace

Sustainable ideologies

Remember, when you take that first leak in the morning,

What hat you have on your head

Your biological beginnings

You may flush in some toilet

Start with

One blink

peace

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Comment #28 posted by global_warming on November 05, 2005 at 14:32:09 PT
Maybe Someday
[Please refrain from using profanity in your message]

Is Heresy still prohibited?

Fuck

Nigga

Spick

Wap

Jew

German

Liberal

Russian

Had to get all this off my chest

Sorry

The Light of Cannabis

Brings Understanding

Understanding,

That brings all of us closer

That Eternal Light

Reveals all of our shadows

That Eternal Light

Lights our illness

That Light can Heal our disease

Get on board

One blink of your eye

Peace



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Comment #27 posted by runruff on November 05, 2005 at 14:29:43 PT:

Running with scissors.
Is the last thing anyone should have told me not to do. Since then I have been a free agent with an authority phobia. If I fall down it's my own fault. I will pick myself back up. But if I fall down because I stepped where someone else told me to step or if I step in something that smells real bad I would feel more stupid than ever. I should be able to step wherever I please and reap the rewards or the consequences.

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Comment #26 posted by FoM on November 05, 2005 at 14:04:55 PT
global_warming
Maybe someday when we are on the Bus we can drink that perfect cup of coffee and talk awhile.

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Comment #25 posted by global_warming on November 05, 2005 at 13:58:53 PT
FOM
Sometimes, you amaze me,

Though I do not even know

The face of Niel Young

His music or his following

Be assured that I await

That time in this world

Were you and I might enjoy

A perfect cup of coffee



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Comment #24 posted by FoM on November 05, 2005 at 13:53:42 PT
global_warming
Thank you. I have never felt that someone who is strung out should be jailed. It's just not a good thing for the person who really just needs help.

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Comment #23 posted by global_warming on November 05, 2005 at 13:27:16 PT
re:21
"I don't believe that a drug addict should ever be jailed."

Amen sister, Amen

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Comment #22 posted by Dankhank on November 05, 2005 at 12:56:08 PT
Zurich
My Lady and I spent a wondrous long weekend in Zurich in 1975.

Just sitting on a bench watching the fast, modern city on the move was exhiliarating.

Downtown parking garages are tunnels into the rock.

Some of the best butter in the world comes from around there.

Chateau Briand ... wow ...

Resins ....



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Comment #21 posted by FoM on November 05, 2005 at 12:33:57 PT
charmed quark
I don't believe that a drug addict should ever be jailed. I believe they need help. Jailing someone who is sick is basically a stupid way of dealing with this problem.

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Comment #20 posted by charmed quark on November 05, 2005 at 12:10:12 PT
Harm reduction and quality of life
http://www.philly.com/mld/inquirer/13086774.htm is an article about the world cities with the highest quality of life. The top two were Geneva and Zurich. It requires registring to read. If you want, you can use www.bugmenot.com to get a temporary account.

Amoung other things, they have very low crime rates. The article says

"One reason crime is so low, some observers suggest, is that Switzerland was an early adapter of so-called harm-reduction strategies for drug users. Heroin addicts can purchase a daily dose from the government and shoot up under official supervision, under a program that Swiss officials say dramatically reduced drug-related crime."

If the USA adapted such a program, all the money we spend arresting and jailing drug users could be spent on health care. We could probably pay for a pretty decent free health care system, considering something like 22% of prisoners are there for drugs.

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Comment #19 posted by FoM on November 05, 2005 at 11:26:59 PT
I Agree Hope
That's why I believe we really need to make affordable health care for all Americans so no one needs to die from cancer just because they don't have the money for Chemo.

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Comment #18 posted by Hope on November 05, 2005 at 11:21:52 PT
A quote from Albert Schweizer:
"We must all die. But if I can save a [person] from days of torture that is what I feel is my great or even new privilege. Pain is a greater lord over mankind than even death itself."

"Those who bear the mark of pain are never really free, for they owe a debt to those who still suffer!"

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Comment #17 posted by FoM on November 05, 2005 at 10:54:58 PT
Siege
The article you posted reminded me of hearing a politican say on CNN that no one is entitled to privacy.

Who wants to be part of a system that knows way too much about you? That's the way it is going though.

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Comment #16 posted by FoM on November 05, 2005 at 10:20:08 PT
Hope
I believe that the poor on welfare do have health care and those who work for a company have health care but people in the very large middle of the economic scale are the ones that don't. If someone decides that they want to go into business for themselves and are enjoying what they are doing they are the ones that can't get or afford coverage. The middle class is the loser. People will say why bother to try to follow a dream and will just live on welfare. We have lost the middle class somewhere along the way.

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Comment #15 posted by siege on November 05, 2005 at 10:09:57 PT
o t RFID
HOW MAJOR CORP'S. PARTNERING WITH GOV'T. PLAN TO TRACK YOUR EVERY MOVE

http://www.newswithviews.com/Mary/starrett63.htm

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Comment #14 posted by FoM on November 05, 2005 at 10:05:00 PT
Health Care and Insurance in General
Insurance companies are not to help people. When a medical disaster or a disaster like Katrina happens people find out real fast what side an insurance company is on. Insurance has so many loopholes and clauses a person can't really recover what they might lose. When I was young loan sharks were thought of as very bad. I look at it all today and credit cards are like loan sharks. Things are really wrong.

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Comment #13 posted by Hope on November 05, 2005 at 09:57:30 PT
"pay more taxes"
People likely pay enough taxes now to provide top quality medical care to the less fortunate. We just need to stop the huge amounts of tax resources funneled into wasteful and fascist projects.

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Comment #12 posted by Hope on November 05, 2005 at 09:54:10 PT
Once the WoD is ended...
my concience says that the next "wrong" that has to be corrected is that the poor or insuranceless get no or inferior health care.

Perhaps those of us with insurance would be allowed to "adopt" three indigents or insuranceless people we know or that are in our families.

I'm so thankful for my insurance coverage...but I'm grieved greatly by the situations other find themselves in. Insurance companies are another bunch that really do not need to control the practice of medicine.

It's horrifying to think that all life saving or improving measures will not be taken for someone because they have no money or insurance.

If there is a judgement day, everyone having anything to do with denying anyone the health care they need, will have to answer for the death and suffering of those they denied help to, for whatever reason.

I would be glad to pay more taxes if it meant that no one would be denied the very best health care available no matter what their station or situation in life may be.

In the end, saving MONEY, and keeping MONEY, won't stand up as an excuse as to why a fellow human was denied any help that science, medicine, and the earth has to offer.

We need more and better equipped hospitals that can and will treat everyone that needs it. We need more doctors more concerned with healing and compassion than they are with having the biggest house and most expensive cars in the neighborhood. A doctor's job is one of the most important and the most difficult and unpleasant around. They work long hours and they have to study and study to know as much as they can. They should be well paid and treasured.

We need more and better equipped schools.

We don't need any more prisons, or more government agencies to intrude into our lives, or buildings to house them.

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Comment #11 posted by FoM on November 05, 2005 at 09:20:11 PT
Dankhank
I agree with you too.

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Comment #10 posted by FoM on November 05, 2005 at 09:17:50 PT
Hope
Both my husband and myself are uninsurable so I know that even thinking about going to a doctor is out of the question. My husband has the VA which is great but unless a man is a Veteran and becomes uninsurable you just die and that's that.

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Comment #9 posted by Dankhank on November 05, 2005 at 09:13:58 PT
Medicine
Agreed ...

However, Cops and Court out of Medicine, thanks ...



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Comment #8 posted by Hope on November 05, 2005 at 09:11:01 PT
Ironic, isn't it?
We can now clearly see that Anslinger was, in fact, the true "degenerate". He lied and hurt people so that new government agencies and jobs for out of work revenue agents could be created. Increasing the size, scope, cronyism, and intrusiveness of government was his goal. He succeeded.

That article in comment 1: It's disheartening to know the government is obviously about protecting the wealthy and most powerful corporations, and not the people. "The last three agreements -- with Singapore, Australia and Morocco -- included language that barred importation of drugs even if the practice were legalized in the future."

I'm so glad that the DEA's "camel nose in the tent" of the FDA was bloodied to the tune of fifty million dollars. It should have been more. (I've got nothing against camels...that just the way the story goes.)

What kind of insanity led leaders to think a law enforcement agency should have the right to overrule doctors and the FDA in pain management? The FDA, like all government agencies, needs oversight...but by law enforcement organizations? I don't think so. Next they'll be wanting to "help" surgeons in the operating room, because DEA knows more about medicine than any doctor could ever hope to.

Could it be that the next time a person gets sick or hurt they should consult with a DEA agent or police officer rather than a doctor?

It's enough to make a person sick just thinking of the injustice, lack of common sense, and waste of resources.

I'd rather live in a world where some people "abused" prescription drugs, even if it was to their own detriment, than one where the people, all of them, are, in fact, "abused", to keep them from finding available relief.

There are so many dangerous, dangerous prescription drugs availabe. Things that are prescribed that can indeed easily kill patients who are taking them as prescribed. We need a good, honest, on the ball FDA. We do not need, of all things, law enforcement making decisions about what medicines are "safe" or not. Likely, no pharmaceutical is "safe" and yes, the FDA is certainly subject to corruption...but it's the corruption that law enforcement needs to look into, not whether they think a medicine should be prescribed or not.

Shut down the DEA, send them to other law enforcement, let them use their law enforcement skills to find murderers, and use the WoD money to provide healthcare to the poor and indigent.

It's not right that a poor person cannot get the same healthcare as a wealthy person. It's a true "right to life" issue.

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Comment #7 posted by FoM on November 05, 2005 at 09:01:52 PT
Dankhank
I'm glad you are happy about the DEA article. I don't use any drugs or even go to a Doctor anymore so I guess it doesn't interest me. I plan on going naturally! LOL!

All kidding aside I really am anti-drugs and pharmaceuticals because I don't see them as helpful to the people I know. I have seen serious addiction to legal drugs more then I care to even think about. The doctor I went to for years was liberal with narcotics and most of his patients were strung out and then he moved far away and left his patients climbing the walls.

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Comment #6 posted by Dankhank on November 05, 2005 at 08:36:30 PT
Siege
I like YOUR title, better ...

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Comment #5 posted by Dankhank on November 05, 2005 at 08:34:45 PT
DEA
FoM

I think I am almost as happy for the story on the DEA as I am about Denver.

Doctors must take back the practice of medicine from cops and politicians.



[ Post Comment ]
 
Comment #4 posted by siege on November 05, 2005 at 08:25:01 PT
sorry
http://www.avantnews.com/modules/news/article.php?storyid=165 http: //www.avantnews.com/modules/news/article.php?storyid=165&page=1

[ Post Comment ]
 
Comment #3 posted by siege on November 05, 2005 at 08:23:26 PT
o t Bush Finds Iraq Exit Strategy in Crawford Dung
House, his Crawford estate dungarees were nonetheless available to him due to the fact that the president's entire wardrobe, which includes flight suits, fireman's helmets, a latex "compassionate face" and other familiar costumes, routinely travels with him on vacation and back again along with his staff, selected reporters and a coterie of top lobbyists. Forensic experts from the Federal Bureau of Investigation are now examining the document in the hope that the faded text of the exit strategy may be reconstructed from fibers of the paper, which appears to be a receipt for an adult film entitled "Back Door Draft" from a video rental establishment.

[ Post Comment ]
 
Comment #2 posted by Dankhank on November 05, 2005 at 07:54:01 PT
sad saga of Sam Caldwell ...
and Moses Baca, married father of three.

The first family blasted apart by evil prohibitionists.



[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #1 posted by FoM on November 05, 2005 at 07:27:39 PT
Off Topic: DEA
Why does the DEA have a say on Cannabis issues?

***

Drug Enforcement Agency Stripped of Role on New Painkillers

***

By Marc Kaufman, Washington Post Staff Writer

Saturday, November 5, 2005; Page A13

A House-Senate conference committee yesterday dropped a controversial provision that gave the Drug Enforcement Administration authority to review, and potentially block, the sale of all new prescription narcotics.

The legislation, promoted by Rep. Frank R. Wolf (R-Va.) and attached to a multi-department appropriations bill, passed last year with little notice. But this year the Food and Drug Administration, many drug makers and doctors who treat pain patients objected to renewing it, and the provision was stripped from the bill.

Opponents said the provision was an unwarranted intrusion by a law enforcement agency into the FDA's drug-review system. Pain specialists also said the DEA reviews could jeopardize development of new drugs needed by patients with chronic pain.

Wolf's spokesman, Dan Scandling, said that Congress had missed an opportunity to better control the sale of powerful new narcotic painkillers.

"The goal behind it was to prevent another OxyContin," he said, referring to the popular painkiller that has been subject to abuse. "Now that oversight isn't going to be there."

John Scofield, spokesman for the House Appropriations Committee, said the provision was dropped at the request of the Senate, which did not include it in its version of the appropriations bill.

The dispute over the measure, and the almost $50 million in additional DEA funding attached to it, reflect a wider debate over the DEA's proper role in monitoring the use of prescription painkillers.

The agency has arrested scores of doctors, pharmacists and other health-care workers accused of negligence or willful diversion in dispensing prescription narcotics that were later abused. Pain doctors complained that, as a result, many physicians have stopped prescribing needed painkillers.

The same conference committee also approved language proposed by Rep. Anne M. Northup (R-Ky.) that would bar the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative from including provisions in future trade agreements that would make it almost impossible to import prescription drugs from foreign countries. The last three agreements -- with Singapore, Australia and Morocco -- included language that barred importation of drugs even if the practice were legalized in the future.

Copyright: 2005 The Washington Post Company

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2005/11/04/AR2005110401876.html

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