cannabisnews.com: Colorado Hemp Grower To Plant Historic First Crop
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Colorado Hemp Grower To Plant Historic First Crop
Posted by CN Staff on April 21, 2013 at 06:57:19 PT
By Steve Raabe, The Denver Post
Source: Denver Post
Colorado -- Ryan Loflin plans to make history, becoming the nation's first commercial-scale hemp grower in almost 60 years. In a few days, he will plant his hemp crop on a farm in the far southeastern corner of Colorado. Loflin and a handful of other growers are set to capitalize on hemp's new legal status in Colorado. Plenty of financial, operational and legal challenges lie ahead. But cultivating the marijuana look-alike is no novelty pursuit for Loflin, who owns a company called Colorado Hemp. He sees it as a commodity that one day could help reverse the sagging fortunes of rural Colorado.
"I believe this is really going to revitalize and strengthen farm communities," said Loflin, 40, who grew up on a farm in Springfield but left after high school for a career in construction.Now he returns, leasing 60 acres of his father's alfalfa farm to plant the crop and install a press to squeeze the oil from hemp seeds. He'll have a jump on other farmers, with 400 starter plants already growing at an indoor facility prior to transplanting them in the field. Hemp is genetically related to marijuana but contains little or no THC, the psychoactive substance in marijuana.The sale of hemp products in the U.S.  including food, cosmetics, clothing and industrial materials  reached an estimated $500 million last year, according to the Hemp Industries Association.Yet because of a federal prohibition on growing, all hemp used in U.S. products is imported from foreign countries. SnippedComplete Article: http://www.denverpost.com/business/ci_23066385/Newshawk: The GCWSource: Denver Post (CO)Author:   Steve Raabe, The Denver PostPublished: April 21, 2013Copyright: 2013 The Denver Post Website: http://www.denverpost.com/Contact: openforum denverpost.comCannabisNews  Hemp Archiveshttp://cannabisnews.com/news/list/hemp.shtml 
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Comment #7 posted by FoM on April 24, 2013 at 05:26:01 PT
gloovins
Hi! It's great to see you!
[ Post Comment ]


Comment #6 posted by gloovins on April 23, 2013 at 20:35:07 PT
I have to admit.....
This is an awesome headline! (way overdue if I may say...)
Hi FoM :)
[ Post Comment ]


Comment #5 posted by Paul Pot on April 22, 2013 at 21:26:24 PT:
Hemp For Victory!
This is great news. It will take a while to rebuild the hemp economy but it will grow exponentially from this humble beginning. Unlike marijuana, which gains much of its value from scarcity, hemp grows in value with increased availability as industries innovate with it and consume more. Hemp will have many uses in the textile and construction industries, both of which consume vast amounts of materials. The future's so bright I gotta wear shades.
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Comment #4 posted by The GCW on April 22, 2013 at 21:21:19 PT
Driving stoned bill fizzles in Colorado Senate
Driving stoned bill fizzles in Colorado Senatehttp://www.denverpost.com/breakingnews/ci_23083425/driving-stoned-bill-fizzlesA marijuana blood limit for drivers was rejected Monday for a fourth time in the Colorado Senate, where bipartisan skepticism on the pot analogy to blood-alcohol limits helped sink the measure even in a weaker form.Cont.
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Comment #3 posted by HempWorld on April 22, 2013 at 11:08:55 PT
Funny!
Animals on weed!http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=2X4XBEeBv08
Animals on weed!
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Comment #2 posted by HempWorld on April 21, 2013 at 11:20:41 PT
This is encouraging, but...
I wonder when the Rockefeller goons will (goose) step in.Kudos to Mr. Ryan Loflin for trying, we hope he will be successful.God bless Ryan Loflin!
Hemp Crete!
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Comment #1 posted by The GCW on April 21, 2013 at 07:14:05 PT
Allow free American farmers to grow hemp.
It's time to RE-introduce hemp as a component of American agriculture.Every health food store sells hemp seeds, hemp seed oil, foods etc. I've been purchasing hemp seeds and oil for over a decade from My local health food stores. All the hemp used in those products is grown by foreign countries, mostly Canada, a nice enough country but I'd rather American farmers be allowed to grow and make money on that hemp.It is ridiculous that the United States government classifies hemp alongside heroin! It's time to stop donkeys from regulating hemp and cannabis.Communist Chinese farmers are allowed to grow hemp but free American farmers are not allowed. -And America's largest foreign debt is with China. It will be extremely disappointing if government hassles Colorado farmers who attempt to grow the God-given plant (see page 1 of the Bible) hemp.
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