cannabisnews.com: Police Chiefs Against Medical Marijuana
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Police Chiefs Against Medical Marijuana
Posted by CN Staff on March 29, 2012 at 04:33:17 PT
From Staff and Wire Reports
Source: Foster's Daily Democrat
Concord -- A bill that would allow people in New Hampshire with chronic health problems to use marijuana received the backing of the Republican Senate this week, but with the proposal gaining momentum in Concord, local police chiefs worry it would strengthen efforts to legalize the drug in the Granite State.Gov. John Lynch has indicated he will veto the Senate bill, which passed on a 13-11 vote late Wednesday night.
It would allow patients with "debilitating medical conditions" or their designated caretakers to possess up to 6 ounces of marijuana, four mature plants and 12 seedlings at a single, registered "cultivation location." They could also avoid penalties for possessing up to two ounces of marijuana elsewhere.In an email, Dover Police Chief Anthony Colarusso said he worries the bill is a "proverbial 'foot in the door'" for efforts to legalize marijuana. He also fears marijuana grown for medicinal purposes will be diverted into the illegal drug trade, something that occurs now with prescription drugs.Allowing medical marijuana use would also send youths the wrong message, and give "one more justification for a young person to try marijuana," Colarusso wrote."When something is legalized, it is also legitimized," he wrote.The N.H. Association of Police Chiefs doesn't support the bill, and Durham Police Chief Dave Kurz added his voice to the opposition Wednesday, saying the legislation will erode marijuana prohibitions down the road."If you want to legalize, let's have the discussion, but I believe this is sort of a back-door entry into legalization," he said.Kurz said the legislation stands to make policing more difficult, since officers will need to be trained about the medical marijuana cultivation regulations, and then exercise discretion in the field. He also pointed out that marijuana cultivation is still illegal under federal law.Supporters say the bill's home cultivation approach would reduce the risk of abuse or federal prosecution. Caretakers would be volunteers  most likely family members, they say. The law permits compensation for actual costs like electricity, but not labor, which supporters say eliminates the business aspect.Patients would need a registry identification card, which would require written certification from their doctor that medical use of marijuana would help treat a "debilitating medical condition." Qualifying conditions include cancer, HIV, AIDS and post-traumatic stress disorder. Some symptoms or treatment results such as severe pain or severe nausea would also qualify.Patients with a qualifying condition visiting from out of state could also possess marijuana without a card, but not cultivate it. Caretakers would need a card as well and would be subject to a background check.The bill passed on a narrow 13-11 vote Wednesday, after Senators adopted one last amendment by Sen. Jim Forsythe, the Strafford Republican sponsoring the bill, which reduced the number of plants patients are allowed to grow from six to four, with a maximum canopy of 100 square feet.The bill would not legalize marijuana possession for anyone beyond registry identification card holders or visiting qualifying patients. Card holders who provide marijuana to anyone not allowed to have it would have their cards revoked and face a Class B felony, punishable by up to seven years in prison. Additional penalties for illegal marijuana sale would also apply.The proposed law also would expire after three years unless lawmakers acted to renew it.Colarusso said a recent youth survey found marijuana is now more widely used by Dover teens than tobacco. He said the drop in youth tobacco use suggests antismoking campaigns have been successful, and the Senate bill could have the opposite effect for marijuana use."I have been in law enforcement for 27 years, and I cannot remember a time when drug use and crime related to drug use is as prevalent as it is now," he wrote. "The illegal use of legal drugs is currently the biggest problem. We need fewer options for those who abuse drugs, not more of them."Staff Writer Jim Haddadin contributed to this report. Source: Foster's Daily Democrat (NH)Published: Thursday, March 29, 2012Copyright: 2012 Geo. J. Foster Co.Contact: letters fosters.comWebsite: http://www.fosters.com/URL: http://drugsense.org/url/S91waDQ4CannabisNews Medical Marijuana Archiveshttp://cannabisnews.com/news/list/medical.shtml 
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Comment #4 posted by Paint with light on March 29, 2012 at 23:25:18 PT
Same ole same ole
"Allowing medical marijuana use would also send youths the wrong message, and give "one more justification for a young person to try marijuana," Colarusso wrote."Safer than alcohol which they constantly get the message is okay."If you want to legalize, let's have the discussion,...."Okay, you bring your lies and we will bring the facts."The bill would not legalize marijuana possession for anyone beyond registry identification card holders or visiting qualifying patients. Card holders who provide marijuana to anyone not allowed to have it would have their cards revoked and face a Class B felony, punishable by up to seven years in prison."Seven years? Ridiculous.Legal like alcohol and safer too.
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Comment #3 posted by The GCW on March 29, 2012 at 08:31:41 PT
Dim bulbs.
It's difficult to see in the dark and refuse to turn on the light. For when the light is on cannabis clearly looks like a plant and not a "drug". When a person wishes to continue cannabis prohibition for which ever ignorant reason is chosen, it is best to keep the light off.The IGOIDS THREATENED BY THE LIGHT CLUB (The I.T.L.C.)In the dark,;,; police speaking about perpetuating cannabis prohibition and extermination, appear as Anti-American cartel members. (And should be treated like vampires)SWATSTIKA power.
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Comment #2 posted by runruff on March 29, 2012 at 08:02:28 PT
News letter.
Dear jerry,
 
Never before have I seen such momentum to end the failed war on drugs. The drug policy reform movement is gaining significant ground.
 
This month, evangelical religious leader Pat Robertson said that marijuana should be regulated like alcohol. He also endorsed the Colorado and Washington State marijuana legalization ballot initiatives.
 
Last week, Latin American leaders met to discuss alternatives to the failed war on drugs. For the first time, we are hearing current presidents denounce the drug war and call for breaking the taboo on discussing alternatives to failed prohibitionist policies.
 
When Vice President Biden visited the region a few weeks ago, he acknowledged that legalization is a legitimate subject for debate -- even as he insisted that the Obama administration still firmly opposes it. That acknowledgement represented a modest but important new step forward. But despite this momentum, the war on drugs rages on. Most U.S. policymakers remain firmly entrenched in the drug war mentality. Many challenges and opportunities lie ahead. I need you to stay with me so we can fight this insanity!
 
jerry, help us raise $14,000 by midnight next Thursday. Your tax-deductible donation will help us educate the public and politicians about the devastating reality of the drug war and the need to pursue alternative policies.
 
By lifting the de facto prohibition on consideration of drug war alternatives, the Drug Policy Alliance and our supporters have changed the debate and are bringing it to the forefront of By lifting the de facto prohibition on consideration of mainstream attention. This shift is a crucial step in dismantling the drug war. Our work with the Global Commission on Drug Policy undoubtedly influenced the growing number of courageous leaders in Latin America or elsewhere who are now speaking out. At this point it is no longer possible to put this genie back in the bottle.
 
DPA is working with local partners to legalize marijuana in Colorado and Washington this November and we're working with Congress on a historic bill that would end federal marijuana prohibition. The most recent Gallup Poll showed -- for the first time ever -- that half of all Americans think that marijuana should be legal. We are on the verge of a major breakthrough. I have never felt so optimistic. But I also know that this movement needs your unfailing support to keep moving forward. We won't back down but neither will our opposition.
 
With your help, we've pushed drug policy reform forward but the challenges that lie ahead will require resources to tip the scale. Donate today and help the Drug Policy Alliance dismantle the drug war and promote alternatives grounded in science, compassion, health and human rights.
 
Sincerely,
 
Ethan Nadelmann
Executive Director
Drug Policy Alliance 
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Comment #1 posted by dongenero on March 29, 2012 at 07:46:36 PT
Never ceases to amaze
"I have been in law enforcement for 27 years, and I cannot remember a time when drug use and crime related to drug use is as prevalent as it is now," Dover Police Chief Anthony Colarusso wrote.They don't get it even when they are saying it themselves.......it's the prohibition stupid.
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