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††Rules for Dispensaries Would Be State's Toughest

Posted by CN Staff on April 27, 2010 at 05:38:41 PT
By J.M. Brown, Santa Cruz Sentinel†
Source: Santa Cruz Sentinel†

Santa Cruz, CA  -- The City Council on Tuesday could pass the state's strictest financial reporting requirements for medical marijuana dispensaries.Under proposed rules designed to ensure pot shops are behaving as nonprofits, the city's two dispensaries would be required to report sales sorted by zip code and disclose how often the price was discounted. The organizations would also have to report what type of marijuana and other products were sold and grown, as well as release tax statements and information about their governing boards.
Councilmembers Cynthia Mathews and Don Lane have negotiated for weeks with representatives of the two dispensaries, Greenway Compassionate Relief and Santa Cruz Patients Collective, to create rules that raise the level of public scrutiny without making requirements that are too onerous for the small nonprofits to follow. The council members characterized the dispensaries as well managed, saying the new rules are just part of an overall effort to improve medical marijuana use.Even though the proposed regulations don't require dispensaries to disclose their prices, Lane said the financial monitoring will ensure the nonprofits aren't enriching themselves. Sales tracking will give city leaders an idea of whether the number of dispensaries - restricted to two by the council last month - are enough to meet local demand."If there is revenue that exceeds expenses, they have to disclose that," Lane said. "We would be able to see straight-forwardly that no one is making a profit."Don Duncan, the California director for the national advocacy group Americans for Safe Access, said Santa Cruz's proposed reporting rules are the toughest in the state. He consulted with city officials on the draft rules, but said he wishes the final version contained fewer mandates. "This is the only ordinance in the state that requires that level of detail," Duncan said. "They want accountability and transparency, but it would seem that a simpler process would be more desirable."Mathews said the draft ordinance is simpler than what was first considered. A state income tax return will provide a lot of the required information, including annual revenue figures and the salaries of directors. But Mathews said the additional sales data also will help the city - widely known for its compassionate stance on pot use - better understand the inner workings of dispensaries, which have been the subject of some public speculation."They'll give us a more organized snapshot of the services," she said.Scott Wade, spokesman for Greenway Compassionate Relief, said there is no hidden profit to reveal and that the proposed ordinance is "a good compromise" with the city. But, he said, "It's going to take a huge amount of time to put together these statistics."The increased regulation of pot shops began last year after two applicants requested permits from the city to open new dispensaries. One later dropped out, but the council passed a temporary ban while city staff studied whether there was a need for another dispensary.On March 23, the council approved recommendations from city planners to limit pot shops to two in non-residential areas, but also to allow them to grow their own product to reduce costs. Some residents said allowing additional dispensaries would increase crime, while supporters said more competition would keep prices down.While Lane said the new rules don't expressly allow the city to monitor prices, he said making sure the dispensaries are acting as true nonprofits is key."If there is no profit, there is no reason for anyone to charge higher prices," he said.If you go:SANTA CRUZ CITY COUNCILWHAT: Proposed financial reporting requirements for medical marijuana dispensariesWHEN: 7 p.m. tonightWHERE: Council Chamber, 809 Center St.INFORMATION: cityofsantacruz.comSource: Santa Cruz Sentinel (CA)Author: J.M. Brown, Santa Cruz SentinelPublished: April 26, 2010Copyright: 2010 Santa Cruz SentinelContact: editorial santa-cruz.comWebsite: http://www.santacruzsentinel.com/URL: http://santacruzsentinel.com/ci_14963689CannabisNews Medical Marijuana Archiveshttp://cannabisnews.com/news/list/medical.shtml 

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Comment #40 posted by FoM on April 30, 2010 at 19:35:06 PT
Hope
That's a good idea. I think the problem is the oil covers an area the size of the state of Maryland. The way the winds are blowing and battling waves it would be like plugging a hole and another hole would pop up. 
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Comment #39 posted by Hope on April 30, 2010 at 19:14:24 PT
This morning
I was wondering why they couldn't get a bunch of tankers out there and vacuum and suck it all into the tankers... and go ahead and refine it... and not leave it out there or try to emulsify or burn it or something. And keep doing that until they recapture all or most of it and get down there and stop more from coming out. It seems simple, I know... but I'm sure we have that kind of technology. Something just to suck it off the water and into tankers and the tankers taken in and the oil put wherever tankers of oil are unloaded and the tanker ships, as soon as they are unloaded, immediately sent back out for another load.
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Comment #38 posted by FoM on April 30, 2010 at 18:44:06 PT
Hope
I've been following this disaster on the Nola link and on the news today. The Gulf is like a trap. When the oil fills up in the Gulf it will only be able to widen out. What if it caught on fire then? If this had happened in the open sea it would be bad but this is really going to be horrible. 
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Comment #37 posted by Hope on April 29, 2010 at 20:51:02 PT
Capping a ruptured well on land is hard
Under water... deep under water. Oh my.I read there might be efforts to cover it with some sort of capping device that looks and works something like an inverted bowl to cap it off. That, obviously won't be easy with oil rushing out of it at the rate it is and pushing with the kind of pressure it's bound to be gushing out at. A lot and fast. I can't imagine what sort of pressure and weight it would have to exert to stop the oil, if they can even manage to get it over the right spot. It's under terrific pressure. The ocean is moving constantly. And to have to go into the middle of the spill and aim the thing to the right space... and hope the whole world doesn't burst into flames when you're trying to cap it. They must be wearing breathing apparatus that is inhibiting, too. I can't imagine if divers are down in it and what it must be like for them if they are. It's horrendous, but I know people are risking their lives and working furiously to try to contain the thing.I pray they are skilled enough to do it, and blessed with great help and grace, and that no more lives are lost.
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Comment #36 posted by FoM on April 29, 2010 at 20:07:48 PT
Hope
Everyday life makes our future history. I was thinking about what this event could turn into. At about 210,000 gallons a days that will keep on pouring into the Gulf for possibly months I cringe at the horror potential of it all. Like the one article said this is not a spill. A spill will stop but this won't stop until it can be stopped. It's a river of oil! 
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Comment #35 posted by Hope on April 29, 2010 at 19:45:58 PT
One of those articles on the oil spills
mentions oyster beds. They were on my mind earlier today. They can't swim away.
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Comment #34 posted by Hope on April 29, 2010 at 19:38:14 PT
Truck drivers
I'm sure it does. Cab drivers. Convenience store workers. Farm and ranch workers. Construction workers. Riveters. Carpenters. Road workers. Electricians. Roofers. Fishermen. Miners. Herpetologists. Factory workers. Laundry workers... they showed one horrible thing where a man got sucked into a dryer at a big commercial laundry. He died. Everyone that dies while working. They were basically talking about deaths caused by accidents. Probably anything where workman's comp comes into play. I think. I paid some attention to it and I did hear that about fourteen workers a day.
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Comment #33 posted by FoM on April 29, 2010 at 19:24:27 PT
Nola.com: News From Louisana On Oil Issue
URL: http://topics.nola.com/tag/oil-spill-gulf-of-mexico-2010/index.html
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Comment #32 posted by FoM on April 29, 2010 at 16:23:03 PT
Hope
I wonder if that includes truck drivers.
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Comment #31 posted by Hope on April 29, 2010 at 15:43:55 PT
I saw an interesting program somewhere
last night about how many deaths there are a day on the job in the United States. They said there are an average of fourteen workers dieing each day on the job in this country.
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Comment #30 posted by FoM on April 29, 2010 at 14:57:36 PT
Hope
I was not serious. What I mean is the tea party people protest against everything this administration stands for. If this administration does the best they can do to help will they blame him or the oil company for not using adequate safety measures? 
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Comment #29 posted by Hope on April 29, 2010 at 14:38:26 PT
Good grief.... Protest the oil spill?
Better to get to work in helping clean it up and save us much and as many as possible or get out of the way. It's a terribly dangerous situation for the people out there struggling with it, too.After it's under control and cleaned up, then if someone wants to raise hell... do it then... after they help save the land and it's creatures to the greatest degree they can.Sure. It's awful. But if I can go and march up and down with a sign I can help clean up sea gulls... first.
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Comment #28 posted by FoM on April 29, 2010 at 14:23:35 PT
BGreen and Hope
There are things more important that was the tea party people push. I wonder if they are upset and will protest the oil spill when it finally hits the shore when we see animals and fish losing their lives?
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Comment #27 posted by BGreen on April 29, 2010 at 13:57:02 PT
Here's your "Drill, Baby, Drill," Tea Baggers
Rape the people, rape the land, rape the plants, rape the seas, rape the truth. Destroy everything and leave no survivors except only those who think like you.Rape the world in the name of Jesus Christ. Sit on your throne of self-righteousness thinking you're the only people truly saved and going to heaven. Wallow in your overwhelming belief that you're one of the few God wants to spend eternity with and then go on your crusade of hatred while you rape, pillage and destroy everything for your own pleasure.Don't be surprised if you destroy yourselves in the process.The Reverend Bud Green
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Comment #26 posted by Hope on April 29, 2010 at 13:25:19 PT
Oil and animals
It gets in their eyes, nostrils, ears, and mouths... and gills of course. They swallow it. It's poison. It has to be a horrifying experience and a horrible death when it kills. People are capable of washing it off. Animals, birds, and fish aren't. I'm sure huge amounts of sea life are already killed, but hopefully, many creatures that could have fled the area, have. I hope.
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Comment #25 posted by Hope on April 29, 2010 at 13:18:00 PT
Until I was thinking about my Dad covered
in oil just now, I realized something I never thought about then. I bet it burned. Gasoline burns in contact with the skin, I bet that oil did, too. He didn't usually get coated with liquid black oil though. It was unusual and something had gone wrong if he did.
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Comment #24 posted by FoM on April 29, 2010 at 13:09:32 PT

Hope
During the oil spill that happened during Hurricane Agnes a young filly got loose and got into the oil lagoons they had back then. The whole neighborhood looked for her and she was finally found. The owners took her into their garage and spent hours washing the oil off of her. She was a palomino yearling and she was black. Oil is nasty. She made it luckily.
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Comment #23 posted by FoM on April 29, 2010 at 13:05:45 PT

Hope
I know that everything humanly possible will be done to try to save the coast, fish, animals and people. We as Americans can often be at our best in a disaster. Our good and sharing nature rises to the occasion. 
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Comment #22 posted by Hope on April 29, 2010 at 12:37:51 PT

Dang it
I meant to delete most of that post and rewrite my response to you, FoM.All that rambling and stuff... what I was trying to say is, we can survive this. It's a disaster, but we've had bad air before. People who are weak and have breathing problems ought to leave anyway but might should be evacuated if it gets really bad.It's bad. But it's more survivable than a lot of stuff that can happen.
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Comment #21 posted by Hope on April 29, 2010 at 12:34:17 PT

Runruff
Your wisdom shines, sir.We can't ignore all that forever.We can pretty much survive and overcome this, Martha. I sure hope it wasn't sabotage, but it's certainly going to, and already has, damaged our precious and fragile environment. Seriously. And real people have been blasted and burned and fed to the fishes. Those windmills should be looking better all the time, too. I'm really thinking hemp could help. Hemp from sea to shining sea. Seriously. And if somebody smokes a bit of it, so what?There was a summer I could smell Mexico burning from here in North Texas. I've been in west Texas dust storms. I've seen the stars disappear behind smog, I thought forever, at a terrible wildly air polluting time in the late sixties or early seventies. The daytime had a dirty haze on what should have been clear sunny days. Day after day. Night after night. I thought my children might only get to see pictures of a clear night and stars twinkling.Dawn is the brand of dish detergent I use. Dawn always reminds me of the Exxon Valdez disaster. I love Dawn and how good it is and the company's sense of responsibility for wildlife and the environment since that time. Thanks to Dawn, I think about ecological disasters every day, to one degree or another.I have a fearful respect of oil fields. I was raised around them. I've breathed a bit of oil fires, no doubt. I've seen the earth and water coated with it, too. I never saw and animal drenched in it, except for men, until the Valdez incident. When my dad wasn't rodeoing or working on a ranch he was a roughneck or heavy equipment operator. I remember him at the oil wells. I remember the wells and pumps and all that. I've seen my father black and coated in it with just his eyeballs clear of it, and the top of his head when he took off his hard hat. And I don't know what kind of soap he got it off with but I'm sure Dawn didn't come along until much later. I was very young. Knowing him it was probably Lava. We always had Lava soap in the house. Other soap, too. But we always had Lava.
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Comment #20 posted by FoM on April 29, 2010 at 08:39:47 PT

Oil Spill
We saw the effects of an bad oil spill in the Schuylkill River back in the 70s. It was horrible and that is why oil spills bother me so much.http://drugsense.org/url/dx1iD2PJ
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Comment #19 posted by FoM on April 29, 2010 at 07:46:18 PT

Hope and Runruff
This is going to be very bad. What if the air switches directions and heads towards Florida? It probably will. What if a hurricane is formed in the Gulf in a few months and the oil is picked up and deposited inland? We must change our ways. Like Neil Young sang about in his one song we need to Be The Rain. It is the last song on this link.http://www.nygreendale.com/
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Comment #18 posted by runruff on April 29, 2010 at 07:35:12 PT

Without honest, informed lawmakers...
We cannot have safe renewable fuel.We cannot choose safe nontoxic medications.We cannot have peace on the planet.We will continue to spend half of the national budget on the Pentagon war machine.We cannot choose to conserve our natural resources.
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Comment #17 posted by Hope on April 29, 2010 at 07:13:58 PT

The air isn't going to be very good
and I shudder at all the health problems this and the volcanoes are going to cause... and it will all be blamed on smokers for years and years to come. It all makes me want a cigarette... of some kind.I guess we would have been breathing it anyway once it was being consumed by automobiles and all things that burn oil.They'll get it stopped, but of course... so much damage done.
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Comment #16 posted by FoM on April 29, 2010 at 06:12:55 PT

Hope
Because of how the wind moves people are going to get sick inland too.
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Comment #15 posted by FoM on April 29, 2010 at 06:11:23 PT

Hope
I have been down on the Gulf Coast and it is beautiful. The devastation is going to be very bad. I actually don't know how this will be resolved and that is depressing. I know they will need help from the Feds and that might not be enough. 
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Comment #14 posted by Hope on April 29, 2010 at 06:00:03 PT

Oh, I think they care, FoM
I cared from the moment of the explosion. Actually, I worry about ocean drilling anyway. People have been freaking, actually. Eleven people lost already. The creatures, sea life, turtles, whales, fish, dolphins... the birds... all of it, in terrible, terrible danger.
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Comment #13 posted by FoM on April 29, 2010 at 05:25:03 PT

Update On Oil Spill
I wonder if people will start to care now.***Gulf Oil Spill 'Five Times' Larger Than EstimatedUS coastguard says 5,000 barrels a day of oil are spewing from a well beneath site of the Deepwater Horizon rig explosionApril 29, 2010http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2010/apr/29/gulf-oil-spill-larger-estimated
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Comment #12 posted by FoM on April 28, 2010 at 07:56:48 PT

Related Article From The Santa Cruz Sentinel
Santa Cruz City Council OKs Pot Shop Reporting RulesApril 28, 2010URL: http://www.santacruzsentinel.com/localnews/ci_14973489
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Comment #11 posted by FoM on April 27, 2010 at 19:40:18 PT

John Tyler
I have seen the white sands beaches too and they are very pretty but for how long now.
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Comment #10 posted by FoM on April 27, 2010 at 19:38:00 PT

John Tyler
It is 42,000 gallons a day. It was 1000 barrels a day. I was going to fix my error but I'll leave it now. That's a heck of a lot more oil to contain. They'll probably use it as an excuse to raise prices too. The eco system is really going to suffer.
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Comment #9 posted by John Tyler on April 27, 2010 at 19:29:40 PT

Oil in the water
The report I saw said 42,000 gallons a day were spewing from the well 5,000 feet below the surface.  How do the oil guys really know though?  Right now they donít have any procedures to fix it. Maybe they should think before they do more deep sea drilling. It's a real shame too. The Gulf waters are very pretty, and those white sand beaches,... it's like a post card.
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Comment #8 posted by FoM on April 27, 2010 at 19:06:09 PT

Canis420 
I'm really sorry. This is a really bad situation. A 1000 gallons a day are pouring out into the ocean and since the well is 5,000 feet deep it is going to be really hard to fix. 
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Comment #7 posted by Canis420 on April 27, 2010 at 18:52:44 PT:

FOM #4
Today we smelled the oil on the west coast of Florida. Brought to us with a strong west wind. It was either the oil or the chemicals they are spraying on it to disperse it. If they burn it I can only imagine how fowl the air will get around here. Was very nasty today...yuck
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Comment #6 posted by John Tyler on April 27, 2010 at 17:28:19 PT

annoying
Isnít this all so annoying? The people have worked so hard for decades to get sensible cannabis laws passed and then when they do the legislatures and local government do everything they can to restrict peoplesí access to it. They can say whatever they want but the fact remains they are denying people access to something they legally voted for.  
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Comment #5 posted by The GCW on April 27, 2010 at 17:09:09 PT

Caged for using a God-given plant.
US FL: Quadriplegic Faces Jail Time For Using Medicinal Marijuanahttp://www.mapinc.org/drugnews/v10/n319/a04.html?397
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Comment #4 posted by FoM on April 27, 2010 at 17:06:58 PT

Off Topic
Since there isn't any news to post I am following the oil slick issue in the Gulf. Now they want to burn it! What about the air that people will breathe as it comes inland. And they worry about marijuana. 
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Comment #3 posted by Sam Adams on April 27, 2010 at 13:23:49 PT

Big Pharma in the news
For $520 Million, AstraZeneca Will Settle Case Over Marketing of a Drughttp://www.nytimes.com/2010/04/27/business/27drug.html?scp=2&sq=astrazeneca&st=cseexcerpts:AstraZeneca becomes the fourth pharmaceutical giant in the last three years to admit to federal charges of illegal marketing of antipsychotic drugs, a lucrative category of medications that have quickly risen to the top of United States sales charts. Aggressive sales and promotional practices have helped expand the use of powerful new antipsychotic drugs for children and the elderly. The company, based in London, has been accused of misleading doctors and patients by playing up favorable research and not adequately disclosing studies that show Seroquel increases the risk of diabetes.AstraZeneca still faces more than 25,000 civil lawsuits filed on behalf of patients contending that the company did not disclose the drug’s risks. 
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Comment #2 posted by FoM on April 27, 2010 at 13:10:14 PT

Young People 'Not Enthusiastic' About Voting

By Sean J. MillerApril 27, 2010Young people need motivation to vote in November, according to a new Gallup poll. The April 1-25 survey found that almost half of 18-to-29-year-olds were "not enthusiastic" about casting a ballot in the midterm elections.The poll did have some good news for Democrats. The Gallup survey confirmed that 18-to-29-year-olds prefer Dems to Republicans by a 12-point margin. The party will just need to find a way to motivate this lethargic portion of its base.Ballot initiatives may help in some states. Young voters, California Democratic Party Chairman John Burton suggested recently, may turnout in the Golden State in order to support a ballot initiative to tax and regulate pot.A spokesman for the Marijuana Policy Project said that initiatives to legalize medical marijuana are expected to be on the ballot in South Dakota and Arizona, where there are a several competitive races.URL: http://thehill.com/blogs/ballot-box/polls/94627-young-people-not-enthusiastic-about-voting
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Comment #1 posted by FoM on April 27, 2010 at 06:36:38 PT

Global Marijuana March 2010
May 1, 2010URL: http://www.globalmarijuanamarch.org/
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