cannabisnews.com: Denver's Initiative Does Little To Curb Citations
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Denver's Initiative Does Little To Curb Citations
Posted by CN Staff on March 01, 2010 at 10:53:52 PT
By John Ingold, The Denver Post
Source: Denver Post
Colorado -- More than two years after Denver voters approved a measure making minor marijuana crimes the city's lowest law-enforcement priority, city officials continue to prosecute marijuana cases at a steady clip.Denver city attorneys last year prosecuted 1,696 cases in which possession of less than an ounce of marijuana was at least one of the charges. 
In 2008, 1,658 cases were prosecuted. In 2006  the year before the initiative was approved  prosecutors handled 1,841 marijuana cases.Police citations for possession of small amounts of marijuana continue unabated as well. Figures for citations and prosecutions were released last week at a meeting of the city's Marijuana Policy Review Panel.The continued enforcement has frustrated some members of the panel, which was created by the voter initiative to implement the new law."Police should not be spending any time arresting and citing people for marijuana," said Mason Tvert, who runs the pro-marijuana-legalization group SAFER and is a member of the panel. "Voters do not want them to issue those citations."Denver prosecutors, meanwhile, say their hands are tied in the marijuana cases because they are bound in those cases to follow state law, not local law. Vince DiCroce, who is the director of the Denver city attorney's prosecution section and a panel member, said city attorneys  who ordinarily prosecute violations of city ordinance  act as special district attorneys when prosecuting marijuana crimes, which are charged as violations of separate state law. Because of that, DiCroce said, prosecutors don't take into account the voter initiative when pursuing cases. Snipped   Complete Article: http://www.denverpost.com/ci_14489539Newshawk: The GCWSource: Denver Post (CO)Author: John Ingold, The Denver PostPublished: March 1, 2010Copyright: 2010 The Denver Post CorpWebsite: http://www.denverpost.com/Contact: openforum denverpost.comCannabisNews -- Cannabis Archiveshttp://cannabisnews.com/news/list/cannabis.shtml 
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Comment #6 posted by ekim on March 02, 2010 at 13:21:36 PT
seeking support to soften pot laws 
Marijuana proponents to start gathering signatures for ballot initiative 10:00 AM A local marijuana reform group will begin collecting signatures this week seeking support to soften pot laws in the city of Kalamazoo. http://www.mlive.com/kalamazoo/
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Comment #5 posted by dongenero on March 02, 2010 at 08:09:50 PT
This war on drugs..
is a sick policy of government against citizens, taken to the extreme.During alcohol prohibition, there was the infamous St. Valentines Day massacre. It was an outrageous climax of violence related to black market alcohol. It was 7 people, involved in the alcohol trade.  The public was outraged. Eventually, it was clear that prohibition was worse than any realities of the substance prohibited. So, we stepped right back in it....for 70 some years.Can you imagine that today's public would eye bat an eye at 7 souls murdered in drug violence these days? I don't think there would be too much notice if a drug swat team mistakenly gunned down 7 innocent people.  The public are so numb to it all, it's just a part of "normal" life now.It's a symptom of a sick society. "We" created it through social/political/legislative policies of prohibition.
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Comment #4 posted by Paint with light on March 02, 2010 at 02:13:05 PT
dongenero
You made me think of the movie Soylent Green.Except now they are grinding up "Bud and his bud", in the legal system and living off of that.Legal like lawyers....or alcohol.
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Comment #3 posted by dongenero on March 01, 2010 at 13:14:26 PT
War on Cannabis
It's kind of like the meat packing industry too.Except it's US citizens run through the grinder rather than cattle. Medical users are just like downer cattle. It pays to send them through as well, if the processors can get away with it.Freedom? You can't let an ambiguous concept such as freedom get in the way of a good profit potential. Even if it is a bit cannibalistic. I'm sure that only bugs one for awhile, then you get over the fact that you are preying on your fellow citizens. 
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Comment #2 posted by runruff on March 01, 2010 at 11:17:18 PT
I have two shows archived here at Takilma FM
http://www.takilmafm.com/Downloads.phpcaution, some parts of this reading my be disturbing as it is all true!
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Comment #1 posted by runruff on March 01, 2010 at 11:12:13 PT
Attorneys are addicted to marihuana. [cases]
The Mcdonalds of the justice system. Fast,low over head, low time consuming, one in the win column, quick, rubber stamp cases, easy money plus asset forfeiture and feeding the prison industrial complex with prime, easy to do time, prisoners.
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