cannabisnews.com: Let Desperate Patients Have Pot
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Let Desperate Patients Have Pot
Posted by CN Staff on November 19, 2009 at 07:59:49 PT
Editorial 
Source: Wisconsin State Journal
Wisconsin -- A doctor should be able to recommend marijuana to a Wisconsin cancer patient suffering from severe nausea, loss of appetite and pain. More than a dozen other states have legalized medical marijuana. Wisconsin should, too.Opponents say there's not enough evidence marijuana works. Tell that to the cancer and multiple sclerosis patients who swear by it - and to the doctors who have recommended the drug.
The problem is that the government hasn't allowed comprehensive tests.The American Medical Association last week called on the federal government to review its classification of marijuana as a controlled substance so more research on marijuana-based medicines can occur.Doctors already legally prescribe morphine and OxyContin. Marijuana is less potent than those drugs. And the public increasingly supports letting doctors prescribe marijuana to terribly ill patients.Rep. Mark Pocan, D-Madison, and Sen. Jon Erpenbach, D-Waunakee, are sponsoring a bill in the Legislature to let doctors do just that.Assembly Bill 554 would create a state registry for medical users of marijuana, require a fee and distribute annual ID cards.One provision in the bill deserving careful review is permission for patients to grow their own marijuana at home.If that's too ripe for abuse, a drug company could grow the drug and dispense it through medical professionals or pharmacies.Gov. Jim Doyle announced his support for legalizing medical marijuana last month after the Obama administration issued guidelines for federal prosecutors discouraging the arrest of users and suppliers who conform to state laws.The Legislature should send Doyle a carefully-crafted bill to sign before it adjourns next year.Desperate patients suffering from terrible nausea and pain shouldn't have to wait any longer - or risk criminal prosecution - for medicine their doctors say they need.Source: Wisconsin State Journal (WI)Published: Thursday, November 19, 2009 Copyright: 2009 Madison Newspapers, Inc.Contact: wsjopine madison.comURL: http://drugsense.org/url/a3ecmP7nWebsite: http://www.wisconsinstatejournal.com/CannabisNews Medical Marijuana Archiveshttp://cannabisnews.com/news/list/medical.shtml
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Comment #12 posted by runruff on November 20, 2009 at 04:04:16 PT
The story of an American preoccupation!
"See the yellow River Flow" by I. P. Freely!
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Comment #11 posted by HempWorld on November 19, 2009 at 15:24:21 PT
Alcohol and Cigarette Consumers Are Very Expensive
From Norml: Marijuana-Related Health Costs Minimal Compared To Those Of Alcohol, TobaccoVictoria, Canada: Health-related costs per user are eight times higher for drinkers than they are for those who use cannabis, and are more than 40 times higher for tobacco smokers, according to a report published in the British Columbia Mental Health and Addictions Journal.According to the report, "In terms of [health-related] costs per user: tobacco-related health costs are over $800 per user, alcohol-related health costs are much lower at $165 per user, and cannabis-related health costs are the lowest at $20 per user."The review, authored by researchers from the Centre for Addictions Research of British Columbia at the University of Victoria and the Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse at the University of Ottawa, stated: "Alcohol is used by a very large number of people with the vast majority of these using in low- or moderate-risk ways. Conversely, cannabis and tobacco are used by far fewer people. The majority of cannabis use is low- and moderate-risk, however, while the majority of tobacco is high-risk."The study reported that "94 percent of social costs for cannabis are linked to [law] enforcement."The authors concluded: "The harms, risks and social costs of alcohol, cannabis and tobacco vary greatly. A lot has to do with how the substances are handled legally. Alcohol and tobacco are legal substances, which explains their low enforcement costs relative to cannabis. On the other hand, the health costs per user of tobacco and alcohol are much higher than for cannabis. This may indicate that cannabis use involves fewer health risks than alcohol or tobacco."These variations in risk, harms and cost need to be taken into account as we think about further efforts to deal with the use of these three substances. ... Efforts to reduce social costs related to cannabis, for example, will likely involve shifting its legal status by decriminalizing casual use, to reduce the high enforcement costs. Such a shift may be warranted given the apparent lower health risk associated with most cannabis use."Commenting on the study, NORML Deputy Director Paul Armentano, co-author of the book Marijuana Is Safer: So Why Are We Driving People to Drink? (Chelsea Green, 2009) said, "It makes no sense for our society to condone, if not encourage, the use of alcohol  an intoxicant that directly contributes to tens of thousands of deaths annually and countless social problems  while simultaneously stigmatizing and criminalizing the use of cannabis, a substance that is incapable of causing lethal overdose and is associated with far fewer societal costs." According to a recent Rasmussen national poll of 1,000 likely voters, Americans believe by more than two to one that alcohol is "more dangerous" than marijuana.
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Comment #10 posted by museman on November 19, 2009 at 15:08:32 PT
well, I say..
"Opponents say there's not enough evidence marijuana works." I say;"Cannabis users observe there's not enough evidence that their opponents work." (or function, or labor, or partake in any positive action whatsoever)END CANNABIS APARTHEID -REPEAL PROHIBITION NOW
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Comment #9 posted by Hope on November 19, 2009 at 12:15:01 PT
Comment 4 The GCW
Agreed.
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Comment #8 posted by Hope on November 19, 2009 at 12:11:58 PT
Yes. Wisconsin
is Jacki and Gary and all their friends and supporters.They have worked so hard for so long against such terrible odds.It's time for them to see some greater progress. They've so earned it.
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Comment #7 posted by ezrydn on November 19, 2009 at 12:09:35 PT:
You Want Proof??
"Opponents say there's not enough evidence marijuana works."Well, we have more than enough proof that alcohol and nicotine kills. These "opponents" don't seem to worried about THAT now, do they? Clean up what you know, not what you don't know.If sick people say it helps them through their daily lives, then you have your evidence. Evidence isn't produced ONLY in a lab. If I use it and my life is better, more livable, that's all the "proof" I need and I got that proof over 40 years ago!!
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Comment #6 posted by runruff on November 19, 2009 at 12:02:15 PT
Who's on first?
What's on second?
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Comment #5 posted by FoM on November 19, 2009 at 11:24:52 PT
The GCW
I agree with you too.
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Comment #4 posted by The GCW on November 19, 2009 at 11:15:32 PT
I agree too but We all know...
I also agree, however We all also agree,what a great step this is. For Wisconsin to be close is huge. And that's in part thanks to Gary Storck... http://www.mapinc.org/drugnews/v09/n977/a07.html?1121 & Is My 
Medicine Legal YET? http://www.immly.org/ And then if Wisconsin makes the legal move that would be huge, huge.The progress being made is commendable, but yes, until the superplant is RE-legalize for all Americans, it will still be a sad time.
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Comment #3 posted by FoM on November 19, 2009 at 10:53:26 PT
Transcript: Cheech & Chong Light Up 'The Factor'
Thursday, November 19, 2009 URL: http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,575772,00.html
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Comment #2 posted by FoM on November 19, 2009 at 08:50:40 PT
runruff
I agree.
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Comment #1 posted by runruff on November 19, 2009 at 08:28:59 PT
"Let Desperate Patients Have Pot"
What about us "not so desperate" patients? Arn't we out of patience too?Some people don't have a pot to.....!The pot is laughing at the kettle!The kettle is black and likes the pot!The pot went black and can't go back!I have a better slogan: "Let everyone have their herbs!"There I think that about covers it!
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