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Pot Shots
Posted by CN Staff on August 08, 2007 at 12:33:05 PT
By Mark Honigsbaum
Source: Guardian Unlimited
USA -- What is the most valuable cash crop in America? If you answered wheat or corn then either you've been eating too many Fruit Loops or you haven't been inhaling deeply enough. As any fan of Weeds - Showtime's hit series about a dope-dealing suburban mom - will tell you, when it comes to hard cash these days, cannabis is king.According to a study by John Gettman of the Coalition for Rescheduling Cannabis, marijuana cultivation in the US is now worth a staggering $35bn (17.3bn) a year, making old Mary J bigger than corn and wheat combined.
And that's just the illegal variety. Cross the Californian state line and search out a sympathetic physician and you can purchase pot and even cannabis-laced Munchy Way chocolate bars perfectly legally at one the state's 600 medical marijuana dispensaries. Little wonder that the White House is up in arms. Never mind the war on terror, scream the neo-cons, what about the war on weed?Perhaps that explains why last month the Drug Enforcement Agency torched 60,000 marijuana plants with a street value of $30m concealed in a forested preserve in Cook Country, Illinois, as part of a nationwide campaign against marijuana cultivation on public land. Or why two weeks ago the DEA raided 10 marijuana dispensaries in Los Angeles and charged four operators with violating the Controlled Substances Act. Or why the DEA has been using the same federal drug laws to target the cultivation of industrial hemp on Indian reservations. Never mind that hemp, used in everything from rope-making to clothing to car door insulation, is ideal for the dry climate of the Pine Ridge reservation in South Dakota, where farmers like Alex White Plume and other members of the Ogala Sioux tribe eke a living. Or that hemp contains only traces of THC - the psychoactive ingredient in marijuana that gets you high - or that in the 1930s the federal government encouraged the Ogala to cultivate hemp to ease the effects of the Great Depression. According to the DEA, hemp fields could be used to conceal high THC-bearing strains, hence the feds' "zero tolerance" policy.The crackdown comes as Bush's drug czar John Walters - in a series of statements that recall the Reefer Madness campaigns of the 1930s - has sought to demonise marijuana in the public's mind, claiming the current strains are far stronger than the "mom and pop" varieties popular in the 1960s and 70s. In fact, according to the DEA's own handbook, of more than 4, 600 domestic strains analysed by the government between 1998 and 2002, fewer than 2% were found to contain THC levels above 20%.But such is the paranoia in the US today about any form of "subversive activity" that now even local law enforcement officials are getting in on the act - hence the raid last month on Dennis "Day" Yusko, a 71-year-old hippy and veteran of the Woodstock festival by anti-narcotics police dressed in Kevlar jackets (Yusko, a leading light in Woodstock's Rainbow Tribe, was charged with possession of just two grams of marijuana, hardly enough to get a hamster buzzed, let alone Fat Freddy's Cat).The irony is that the crackdown coincides with the 70th anniversary of the Marijuana Tax Act, a law that like the Controlled Substances Act which replaced it, proved a spectacular failure. The 1937 act was conceived as a tax on buyers and sellers, but the penalties for non-compliance were so draconian that it effectively functioned as a ban, prompting the removal of cannabis from the US Pharmacopeia in 1942 (because it required buyers to purchase a stamp, it also clashed with the Fifth Amendment right against self-incrimination). Unfortunately, the 1970 Controlled Substances Act has proved even more punitive, placing marijuana in the same category as heroin and LSD, with stiff 20-year jail terms for those caught "trafficking" across state lines.Yet for all that the White House has sort to demonise weed, dope remains as popular as ever. In a survey last year, 28 million Americans admitted smoking pot and approximately 85% of high school seniors described marijuana as "easy to get" - a figure that has remained virtually unchanged since 1975. And this despite a record 800,000 busts last year, nearly all for simple possession.As Rob Kampia, executive director of the Marijuana Policy Project, which has been pushing for decriminalisation of marijuana, puts it: "It's hard to think of a more spectacularly bad, long-term policy failure than our government's 70-year war on marijuana users."So will the White House roll over and agree to take a hit on this one? Don't count on it. Although California, in common with 11 other states, has deemed the sale of marijuana to treat such medical conditions as glaucoma, cancer and Aids legal and House Democrats are pushing for a ban on the use of federal funds by the DEA to prosecute medical marijuana patients, the justice department argues that the dispensaries are in violation of the Controlled Substances Act and charges the operators with being little better than licensed drug dealers. The result is that the stage is now set for a classic federalist-style confrontation over state's rights, with hundreds of medical marijuana cases pending in the Californian courts.But perhaps we should take heart from the reaction of medical marijuana patients. Earlier this year, they risked arrest by blockading clinics in Santa Monica ahead of DEA raids. Now, with the first court hearings pending, they're threatening to take their campaign state-wide. Proof positive, you might think, that the new strains of marijuana aren't quite the lifeforce-sapping evil portrayed by opponents.Note: The US government is waging a Reefer Madness-style war of words and deeds on the country's cannabis growers. Source: Guardian Unlimited, The (UK)Author: Mark Honigsbaum Published: August 8, 2007 Copyright: 2007 Guardian Newspapers Limited Contact:  letters guardian.co.ukWebsite: http://www.guardian.co.uk/CannabisNews -- Cannabis Archiveshttp://cannabisnews.com/news/list/cannabis.shtml
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Comment #26 posted by FoM on August 09, 2007 at 20:39:41 PT
I'm Back
I agree that the housing industry is in trouble. My nephew is in home construction and it is really slowing up. When homes aren't built or updated it causes ripple effects thruout the economy. I have seen real estate on shows that because it had tile floors, hardwood floors etc. that it was worth a lot of money and I wondered why. A 2 by 4 costs about the same in every area. This was a big scam to make people believe they were brillant in using the system because homes would rise in price. Growth should be slow and steady. PS: We had a really bad thunderstorm and our power was out for about 6 hours but I'm back now. 
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Comment #25 posted by RevRayGreen on August 09, 2007 at 15:20:27 PT
I have an ARM
hitting this month, payments goes up $80. Thing is I'm
getting refinanced, last collections rep was calling from
India, I'm not for outsourcing American jobs. I work in the
same enviroment, glad I work for a company that doesn't or
wouldn't outsource my job.
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Comment #24 posted by whig on August 09, 2007 at 15:17:52 PT
Bush family
This has been their M.O. for a long time, by the way. Remember Neil Bush and Silverado?
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Comment #23 posted by whig on August 09, 2007 at 15:11:25 PT
FoM
The real estate market is really in a lot of trouble and that's much bigger than the stock market. Banks made a lot of marginal loans to people who couldn't possibly afford them and then booked it as profits. This has been a big disaster.I think if you own your home and you don't intend to be making a profit on appreciation or rent you shouldn't care about what real estate prices do because you can always live. But if you have lots of debt you can lose your home.But a lot of our economy is built on this speculative real estate bubble, especially in California since they decided to stop taxing property so much they drove up prices a lot. A lot of people said it was going to burst, but people have short term profits in mind and try to take advantage of the fact that most people don't look at the longer term perspective.
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Comment #22 posted by MikeEEEEE on August 09, 2007 at 15:06:12 PT
FoM
See the movie MaxedOut. Credit card reform was written by MBNA. http://biz.yahoo.com/rb/070809/aig_subprime.html?.v=8This govt. does not work for the average guy, soldier, mother or father. They work for the United Corporations of America.The rich will continue to get richer, while the sheep cave in.
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Comment #21 posted by FoM on August 09, 2007 at 14:09:05 PT
MikeEEEEE
We built our house in 79 and we did most of the building ourselves. My father was an Accountant and he told me the only thing really worth investing in was a home. A home that you stay in for many years. Because we just expanded the square footage and remodeled most of our house I know what it costs to renovate. The prices of houses are really way too high. I love to watch programs on flipping houses. The money a flipper was making was so much I thought it was wrong. What goes up must come down. Steady as you go is the only way to make it under most circumstances.
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Comment #20 posted by MikeEEEEE on August 09, 2007 at 13:54:10 PT
FoM
The American dream could be just that.http://biz.yahoo.com/ap/070809/wall_street.html?.v=64
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Comment #19 posted by FoM on August 09, 2007 at 13:23:35 PT
Toker00
That is great about your son sending you a CD. 
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Comment #18 posted by FoM on August 09, 2007 at 13:22:09 PT
Toker00
I just looked on Google and saw the Stock Market dropped 387 points. I really don't understand it all though. I don't think I can remember any times it went down that bad but I could be wrong. 
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Comment #17 posted by DjLoTi on August 09, 2007 at 09:57:56 PT
Article of 'Prince of Pot' in Seattle times
Article about Marc's support for Ron Paul. I swear it's just a coincidence that I talked about him and found this article a few hours later!http://seattleweekly.com/2007-08-08/news/why-is-this-canadian-pot-dealer-campaigning-for-ron-paul.php
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Comment #16 posted by unkat27 on August 09, 2007 at 09:34:22 PT
#14, Rchandar
-- "I read the article, and the finding is complete freaking BS."Agreed. The DEA is playing the fear-mongering terrorist-link card to drum up support for their unpopular war on cannabis in CA and elsewhere.
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Comment #15 posted by Toker00 on August 09, 2007 at 09:28:29 PT
Feeling activist-y today?
Try this:http://salsa.democracyinaction.org/o/2165/t/1027/campaign.jsp?campaign_KEY=12293Thanks in advance!I'm expecting my son's CD in the mail today. I've never heard him in a band. I've seen his ball games, his karate tournaments, but not heard his music. Joy!Toke.
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Comment #14 posted by rchandar on August 09, 2007 at 09:11:56 PT:
unkat27
Hi,I read the article, and the finding is complete freaking BS. The link to terrorism was coined by Bush in 2001, in the heat of WTC bombings. At the time, the DEA made the case that 70% of ALL MJ was manufactured in the Phillipines--a complete falsehood designed to make the Drug War seem immediately winnable.One may criticize the mafia, no doubt. One may note the gruesome kill techniques of the Michoacan mob, for example. Islamic terrorism? I don't see a real link, and certainly not an operative link. The Mexican mafia has been smuggling drugs into the US for eighty years now. They have syndicates on both sides of the border, have money, technology, weapons. They do not need the Islamic radicals to purvey their goods; such an idea is meant to make it sound like the mafia is getting desperate, that the DEA is close to solving the problem and just need your support. Typical for the Drug Warriors to assume they can achieve an easy victory. Mafia syndicates have partners in the US and Mexican government, in corporations, etc. etc. Thus there is no plausible reason why they would seek any major help from Islamists determined to destroy the USA. I can guarantee that the Michoacan, the Medellin, the Cali, have no interest in destroying the USA. They need their steady customers. Nor do they want to take over the US; if they can deal, make money, then they're happy. It's certainly possible that the mafia may make sometimes friends with people who are Muslims and don't like Bush; it's much more of a stretch to assume that the drug trade is going to destroy America without the DEA's paternal help. The Mexican mafia are not rebels, they are not revolutionaries. They have no political agenda save making sure their product hits the streets. So this claim is really a no-brainer.rchandar
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Comment #13 posted by FoM on August 09, 2007 at 08:35:42 PT
MikeEEEEE
I watched a little of it and then I had to turn on music. I need to keep my blood pressure in check! LOL!
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Comment #12 posted by MikeEEEEE on August 09, 2007 at 08:00:45 PT
Chimpanzee bush
bush is trying to hold the illusion together. Lesson learned: never elect anybody with an IQ below 75.Good bet: he only cares about his image after the term. 
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Comment #11 posted by FoM on August 09, 2007 at 07:51:48 PT
Toker00 
I check out the stock market to see how it's going and it has been really up and down and I am glad I never bought into the idea of investing that way. I believe in what I can see and that's about all. 
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Comment #10 posted by Toker00 on August 09, 2007 at 07:39:23 PT
The tumble begins...
The interest rate's up and the stock market's downAnd you only get mugged if you go downtown.Bush is mumbling some sh*t on Tv. I'll hear it from the press instead. Mute.It is time to Share The Land?Is it time to Shake Your Hand?Toke.
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Comment #9 posted by FoM on August 09, 2007 at 06:32:42 PT
News Brief from KOAT New Mexico
State Workers Could Face Prosecution In Connection With Medical Marijuana August 8, 2007
 Medical marijuana may be legal in New Mexico, but if state workers give patients the drug, they could face prosecution. The new law that passed this year allows people with certain medical conditions to apply for a license to use the drug. But New Mexico Attorney General Gary King said that anyone who has a hand in the process could be subject to federal law. In 2001, the Supreme Court ruled that all marijuana manufacturing and distribution, even for medical purposes, is illegal. The attorney general said there is no guarantee federal prosecutors would come after New Mexico employees, but there is no guarantee they wouldn't either. Copyright 2007 by KOAT.comhttp://www.koat.com/news/13852689/detail.html
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Comment #8 posted by FoM on August 09, 2007 at 05:59:20 PT
unkat27
I don't know if there is a time limit but there could be. When I write a comment I copy it before I press post just incase it doesn't work. I really mind losing my thoughts and that has helped me from losing a post if something goes wrong. 
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Comment #7 posted by unkat27 on August 09, 2007 at 05:56:05 PT
Fom, #6
Didn't happen this time. There seems to be a time-limit of like 3 - 5 minutes involved. If I make it quick enough, it usually works okay.It could be my browser, I dunno. Thanx for the concern. I'll try to make it quick for now on. :)
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Comment #6 posted by FoM on August 09, 2007 at 05:47:16 PT
unkat27
Are you still having problems posting? 
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Comment #5 posted by DjLoTi on August 09, 2007 at 05:28:38 PT
Cannabis Culture sponsers Ron Paul event
Bicycle marathon in SC.. www.cannabisculture.com.. check it out if you're interested.
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Comment #4 posted by unkat27 on August 09, 2007 at 05:03:00 PT
DEA Connects War on Drugs with War on Terror
The DEA is making matters much worse for cannabis users, just as they always do whenever they think they can get away with it."Terrorists teaming with drug cartels"By Sara A. Carter
August 8, 2007Islamic extremists embedded in the United States  posing as Hispanic nationals  are partnering with violent Mexican drug gangs to finance terror networks in the Middle East, according to a Drug Enforcement Administration report."Since drug traffickers and terrorists operate in a clandestine environment, both groups utilize similar methodologies to function ... all lend themselves to facilitation and are among the essential elements that may contribute to the successful conclusion of a catastrophic event by terrorists," said the confidential report, a copy of which was obtained by The Washington Times.http://www.washingtontimes.com/article/20070808/NATION/108080088/1002------------------------------------------------------------Of course, they will NEVER point out the simple fact that if such drugs were not illegal (specifically cannabis, which is by far the most popular), then it's dealers and users would not have such strange (and dangerous) bed-fellows.
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Comment #3 posted by smoknjoe on August 08, 2007 at 18:59:22 PT:
freedom
If any U.S. media ran an article like that the government would call them terroist and shut them down.
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Comment #2 posted by mayan on August 08, 2007 at 18:30:34 PT
The Guardian
What an article! Why won't the U.S. mainstream media run such a hard hitting piece? THE WAY OUT IS THE WAY IN...Another Firefighter Testifies On Explosions Inside WTC: 
http://prisonplanet.com/articles/august2007/080807_b_explosions.htmPolice Seize Cameras, Arrest Photographers and Solicit Information on Other Media at Anti-War Protest: 
http://www.jonesreport.com/articles/070807_camera_confiscated_911.htmlMadison Science of 9/11Conference: Unity in Diversity: 
http://mujca.com/madisonconference.htmKevin Barrett Responds to Capital Times Story:
http://mujca.com/popper.htmHow The Zionist Media Sold 911 to the public (video):
http://factsnotfairies.blogspot.com/2007/08/how-zionist-media-sold-911-to-public.html9/11 WAS AN INSIDE JOB - OUR NATION IS IN PERIL:
http://www.911sharethetruth.com/
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Comment #1 posted by smoknjoe on August 08, 2007 at 18:13:14 PT:
war
if its war you want its war you'll get. I have the right to the pursuit of happiness, or I thought I did.
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