cannabisnews.com: Clinton Outlines Anti-Drug Ad Plan!





Clinton Outlines Anti-Drug Ad Plan!
Posted by FoM on August 02, 1999 at 10:43:08 PT
By The Associated Press
Source: New York Times
WASHINGTON (AP) -- President Clinton today announced a new round of anti-drug advertisements and said a media campaign launched in 1997 already has been successful in reaching young people and their parents. 
``If you're a teen-ager or parent,'' the president said, ``it is nearly impossible to avoid seeing or hearing our anti-drug messages on television or radio several times a week.'' The new campaign, a $1 billion, 5-year effort, is aimed at educating young people to reject drug use. It uses television, radio, the Internet, newspapers, magazines and bus and movie ads to target young people, parents, teachers, mentors, coaches and others. ``We're trying to be where the young kids are,'' said Barry McCaffrey, director of the Office of National Drug Control Policy. ``We expected the ads would greatly increase awareness,'' Clinton said. ``What we didn't expect was that the ads would already have a measurable effect on attitudes. This is a very good sign. What it proves is, I suppose, what we should have known all along, that if advertising works in commerce and advertising works in politics, advertising ought to work on this issue as well.'' Filed at 12:02 p.m. EDTBy The Associated PressCopyright 1999 The New York Times Company 
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Comment #2 posted by FoM on August 03, 1999 at 08:36:52 PT:
Anti-Drug Ads In 12 Languages
Associated PressTuesday, August 3, 1999; Page A09 http://www.washingtonpost.com/The Clinton administration has expanded its anti-drug advertising campaign into 11 languages beyond English -- including Spanish, Mandarin, Cantonese, Korean, Tagalog, Vietnamese, Cambodian, Lakota, Navajo, Cherokee and Aleutian dialect."We expected the ads would greatly increase awareness," Clinton said yesterday at a White House ceremony previewing the new ads. "What we didn't expect was that the ads would already have a measurable effect on attitudes."Begun in 1997, the National Youth Anti-Drug Media Campaign has grown from a 12-city pilot program to a national effort that claims to reach 90 percent of young people four to seven times a week. It uses television, radio, the Internet, newspapers, magazines and bus and movie ads to target young people, parents, teachers, coaches and others."We're trying to be where the young people are," said Barry McCaffrey, director of the Office of National Drug Control Policy.Sen. Frank Lautenberg (D-N.J.) said the campaign was "well-intentioned but incomplete. How can an ad campaign succeed when it ignores underage drinking, the number one drug problem among teens?"But McCaffrey said there is not enough money in the $195 million allocated each year for anti-drug ads to finance anti-alcohol ads as well.  Copyright 1999 The Associated Press
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Comment #1 posted by FoM on August 02, 1999 at 15:35:54 PT:
Clinton Expands Anti-Drug Ad Plan
Las Vegas SUNToday: August 02,199913:01:30 PDT Clinton Expands Anti-Drug Ad PlanASSOCIATED PRESShttp://www.lasvegassun.com/WASHINGTON (AP)The Clinton administration has expanded its anti-drug advertising campaign into 11 languages beyond English - including Chinese, Vietnamese, Korean, Navajo, Cherokee and Aleutian dialect."If you're a teen-ager or parent," President Clinton said Monday, "it is nearly impossible to avoid seeing or hearing our anti-drug messages on television or radio several times a week." He spoke at a ceremony previewing new ads urging young people to reject drug use.Begun in 1997, the National Youth Anti-Drug Media Campaign has grown from a 12-city pilot program to a national effort that claims to reach 90 percent of young people four to seven times a week. It uses television, radio, the Internet, newspapers, magazines and bus and movie ads to target young people, parents, teachers, mentors, coaches and others."We're trying to be where the young people are," said Barry McCaffrey, director of the Office of National Drug Control Policy."We expected the ads would greatly increase awareness," Clinton said. "What we didn't expect was that the ads would already have a measurable effect on attitudes. This is a very good sign. What it proves is, I suppose, what we should have known all along, that if advertising works in commerce and advertising works in politics, advertising ought to work on this issue as well."In addition to English, ads are produced in Spanish, Mandarin, Cantonese, Korean, Tagalog, Vietnamese, Cambodian, Lakota, Navajo, Cherokee and Aleutian dialect.On Capitol Hill, Sen. Frank Lautenberg, D-N.J., said the campaign was "well-intentioned but incomplete. How can an ad campaign succeed when it ignores underage drinking, the number one drug problem among teens? Alcohol kills six times more young people in this country than all illegal drugs combined."McCaffrey, at a White House briefing, said there is not enough money in the $195 million allocated each year for anti-drug ads to finance anti-alcohol ads as well. "If we want to go after underage alcohol abuse with a paid campaign, then we need to pay for it. ... We're right on the margin right now with the amount of money we're using."All contents copyright 1999 Las Vegas SUN, Inc.
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