cannabisnews.com: Nevadans To Vote on Legalizing Marijuana





Nevadans To Vote on Legalizing Marijuana
Posted by CN Staff on October 17, 2006 at 12:13:42 PT
By Sandra Chereb, Associated Press Writer 
Source: Associated Press
Reno, Nev. -- Gambling, prostitution, and now pot? Organizers of a Nevada ballot measure hope voters in a state where almost everything goes will go one better and legalize marijuana. If it passes Nov. 7, Nevada will be the first state to allow adults to possess up to an ounce of pot that they could buy at government-regulated marijuana shops.
The Committee to Regulate and Control Marijuana, which has pushed medical marijuana and decriminalization laws around the country, thinks Nevada  with its embrace of certain vices and its streak of Western independence  is a perfect venue.In an editorial last spring, the rural Lahontan Valley News argued that gambling, Nevada's most powerful industry, caters to "visceral pleasures," and that it would hypocritical to oppose the legalization of marijuana on moral grounds.Proponents of the measure also argue that the legal system wastes time and money on low-level marijuana offenses, and that taxing and regulating pot would put drug dealers out of business while freeing law enforcement to focus on violent crime and more dangerous drugs such as methamphetamine."Put it into a tightly controlled and regulated environment. We think that makes a lot of sense," Neal Levine, executive director of the committee.Opponents, including law enforcement, the nation's drug czar, and civic and business groups, argue the measure would encourage the use of other drugs, and they question whether it will even prove to be a good source of tax revenue."The fact is, growing, distributing and warehousing marijuana will still be a federal offense," said Todd Raybuck, a Las Vegas police officer and spokesman for the Committee to Keep Nevada Respectable, which opposes the measure.Question 7 allows people 21 and older to possess an ounce of marijuana in their homes  the same amount allowed under Nevada's medical marijuana law. Currently, possession of an ounce or less is a misdemeanor punishable by a $600 fine.Twelve states have decriminalized small amounts of marijuana  that is, possession is punishable by a ticket and a fine  and 11 allow its use for medical purposes. Possession of up to an ounce at home is legal in Alaska under a court ruling there, but the case is under appeal.Colorado residents will vote next month on whether to legalize possession of up to an ounce of marijuana by those 21 and older, similar to an ordinance Denver voters approved last year.But the Nevada measure goes further. It directs Nevada's Department of Taxation to set up procedures to license and regulate marijuana growers, distributors and retailers. At the same time, it doubles penalties for selling or giving pot to minors and for vehicular manslaughter while under the influence of drugs or alcohol.The legislation also imposes a $45-per-ounce excise tax, with some of the proceeds going toward the budget and alcohol, tobacco and drug abuse programs. An ounce of pot on the street costs upwards of $300, depending on the quality.A 2002 study by researchers at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas estimated taxing and regulating marijuana would generate $28.6 million in revenue.The Justice Department in Washington did not respond to calls and e-mails seeking comment. In June, the    U.S. Supreme Court ruled people who smoke marijuana for medical reasons can be prosecuted under federal drug laws, and Raybuck said it is doubtful federal agents would tolerate commercial pot ventures in Nevada.In 2002, Nevada voters overwhelmingly rejected a move to legalize up to three ounces of marijuana. The latest measure got onto the ballot after 86,000 people signed petitions.A poll conducted in September for the Las Vegas Review-Journal found 51 percent of voters opposed Question 7, while 42 percent supported it and 7 percent were undecided.The measure has found some surprising allies. "Make no mistake, I don't think using marijuana is a wise choice for anyone," said the Rev. William C. Webb, a Baptist minister who joined dozens of other religious leaders in announcing their backing. But "if there has to be a market in marijuana, I'd rather it be regulated with sensible safeguards than run by violent gangs and dangerous drug dealers." On the Net: Committee to Regulate & Control Marijuana: http://www.regulatemarijuana.org Committee to Keep Nevada Respectable: http://www.nevadasaysno.com National Drug Control Policy Office: http://www.whitehousedrugpolicy.govSource: Associated Press (Wire)Author: Sandra Chereb, Associated Press Writer Published:  October 17, 2006Copyright: 2006 Associated Press Related Articles:Clergy Supports Effort To Legalize Marijuanahttp://cannabisnews.com/news/thread22235.shtmlA Question of Consequenceshttp://cannabisnews.com/news/thread22202.shtmlSmoke Screens - Las Vegas City Lifehttp://cannabisnews.com/news/thread22191.shtml 
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Comment #10 posted by FoM on October 18, 2006 at 17:10:40 PT
Related Article from LasVegasNow.com 
Protestors, Supporters Speak Out About Marijuana Question***October 18, 2006 
 
 
 
 
It was just a few years ago; Nevada voters approved the use of marijuana for medical purposes. Voters will soon head to the polls again to decide whether to legalize marijuana for personal use. The organization Stop DUI is preparing to hold a news conference on the controversial issue.Question 7, if passed, would allow anyone 21 or older to sell, purchase and use up to one ounce of marijuana. Supporters say it would also stiffen the penalties for people convicted of killing or seriously injuring someone while driving under the influence of drugs or alcohol. But those who oppose Question 7 call the measure a wolf in sheep's clothing.18-year-old Brittany Faber has strong feelings about Question 7. "When I was 8, my dad was taken from us in a car crash by a man who was high on marijuana. My mother lost her husband and best friend, and my brother, my sister and I lost a wonderful father." Supporters of Question 7 -- like the Committee to Regulate and Control Marijuana, say, if passed, the measure would regulate and tax the sale of up to one ounce of marijuana. It would also double the prison time and fines for anyone convicted of killing or seriously injuring someone while driving under the influence and more.Neil Levine is with the Committee to Regulate and Control Marijuana. He says, "We double the penalty for anyone who gives marijuana to a minor. So we take it out of the school yard and put it into a tightly regulated system."But UNLV student Brittany Faber, who has spent most of her childhood pushing for tougher penalties against DUI offenders, says she won't support any measure that legalizes any amount of marijuana, arguing it will only make the drug more readily available to minors." "Alcohol is supposedly tightly regulated but go to any college party and you'll see it is still readily available. It's everywhere," Faber said.That argument is also one of the key reasons the group Stop DUI is opposing Question 7.An ounce of marijuana is equivalent to about 60 marijuana cigarettes.Send your comments to Reporter Alyson McCarthy at amccarthy klastv.comCopyright 2000 - 2006 WorldNow and KLAShttp://www.klas-tv.com/Global/story.asp?S=5558495
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Comment #9 posted by Hope on October 18, 2006 at 03:29:38 PT
Comment 5
Been a few years since I brushed up on Mr. X.Thanks, Whig.
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Comment #8 posted by Hope on October 17, 2006 at 22:10:11 PT
2 Lombar
The comments were nasty. I will say this. Everyone doesn't like or enjoy cannabis. I don't believe we've ever claimed that everyone will like it or that it will always agree with them.But why jail the people who do like and for whom it is beneficial? It is quite beneficial for some people. I'm sure of it.
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Comment #7 posted by mayan on October 17, 2006 at 18:23:19 PT
Misc.
Marijuana Consumption Drops in U.K. Despite Liberalized Laws: 
http://prisonplanet.com/articles/October2006/171006Marijuana.htmTHE WAY OUT IS THE WAY IN...Truth seekers, not Bush bashers:
http://www.worldnetdaily.com/news/article.asp?ARTICLE_ID=51579Government Targets American Bloggers As Enemy Propagandists:
http://prisonplanet.com/articles/october2006/171006enemypropagandists.htm9/11 WAS AN INSIDE JOB - OUR NATION IS IN PERIL:
http://www.911sharethetruth.com/
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Comment #6 posted by whig on October 17, 2006 at 17:41:57 PT
lombar
I wrote this reply, which may or may not be edited or published:Y'all are confused, and talking without much understanding of statistics. Both tobacco and cannabis correlate with schizophrenia and depression, to be sure. But here's the interesting thing, with the rise in use of cannabis over the past few decades, there was no corresponding rise in mental illness. The evidence is strongly suggestive that cannabis helps to treat those who are having trouble with mental focus.I take cannabis medicinally, under a physician recommendation, and my experience is that it has beneficial properties for mind, body and spirit.Take a look at:How cannabis works, part 1
http://cannablog.wordpress.com/2006/10/03/how-cannabis-works/ and part 2
http://cannablog.wordpress.com/2006/10/06/how-cannabis-works-part-2/
.
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Comment #5 posted by whig on October 17, 2006 at 17:14:10 PT
Interesting thread
http://www.timboucher.com/journal/2006/10/16/carl-sagans-mr-x-marijuana-essay/
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Comment #4 posted by Max Flowers on October 17, 2006 at 16:08:14 PT
lombar
Yes I agree that one extremely biased person wrote all those negative comments. It's obvious. They are way over the top... I love that one where the lady says that someone she knows is "mentally ill and will have to be in controlled care the rest of his life" without specifically saying that she thinks cannabis did that to the person (a preposterous claim). She tries to imply it by association.Whenever I've seen *real* web comments about a cannabis issue, the responses always seem to be about 70/30 (positive about cannabis/negative about cannabis). Which I think reflects the approximate ratio of attitudes in the populace.
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Comment #3 posted by global_warming on October 17, 2006 at 14:44:04 PT
To The Rev. William C. Webb
"Make no mistake, I don't think using marijuana is a wise choice for anyone," said the Rev. William C. Webb, a Baptist minister who joined dozens of other religious leaders in announcing their backing. But "if there has to be a market in marijuana, I'd rather it be regulated with sensible safeguards than run by violent gangs and dangerous drug dealers."A NO vote will insure that the "violent gangs and dangerous drug dealers" remain in business, and it will get much worse.A YES vote on question 7, will "break" the back of the violence that 'we have handed to our children.A yes vote means that you no longer have to go to some drug dealer in the shadows of some dark alley.A yes vote means, that if you have a problem with substance abuse, you can find help, not some undercover narcotics tactical swat team, but real and genuine medical help.We are ALL IN THIS TOGETHER.
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Comment #2 posted by lombar on October 17, 2006 at 14:07:04 PT
More reefer madness in the UK
Get a LOAD the comments under the following article. I think the editor wrote them, one comment tried to blame every ill the person and a sibling had on it, years later! I submitted a comment but I doubt they will publish it.
8 out of 10 mentally ill patients are heavy cannabis users
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Comment #1 posted by FoM on October 17, 2006 at 13:55:00 PT
Off Topic: Obama
I get Senator Obama's e-mail news and I thought others might like to check out his video.http://www.barackobama.com/media/americas_oil_addiction_cbs/
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