cannabisnews.com: A Little Something in The Pot for Ehrlich





A Little Something in The Pot for Ehrlich
Posted by CN Staff on August 23, 2006 at 06:38:25 PT
By Laura Vozzella
Source: Baltimore Sun
Washington, DC -- The National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws doles out campaign cash to friendly politicians. Like Rep. Barney Frank, the Massachusetts Democrat. And Rep. Dennis Kucinich, the Ohio vegan. Here in Maryland, it's Robert Ehrlich. Surprised? You shouldn't be, says Allen St. Pierre, NORML'S "head head."The group's PAC hasn't given money to many Republicans, and it has never before donated to a sitting governor. But as a congressman and later as governor, Ehrlich has been "one of the clearest politicians in the country supporting physician-approved access to medical marijuana," St. Pierre says. "I think that speaks a little bit to his libertarian streak."
An organization that puts Willie Nelson's mug at the top of its Web site and sells American flag posters with cannabis-leaf stars, NORML is pushing for more than medical marijuana. It wants the drug legalized outright. Ehrlich has given no indication that he's on board with that, St. Pierre says. Campaign spokeswoman Shareese DeLeaver declines to comment beyond saying, "We certainly appreciate NORML's support of Governor Ehrlich's position on medical marijuana."Over the objections of the White House drug czar, Ehrlich signed a bill three years ago that reduced penalties for people who use marijuana for medicinal purposes. That made him the second governor in the nation, and the first Republican, to sign medical marijuana legislation. It also endeared him to NORML, which intends to give Ehrlich $1,250 over the course of the campaign, St. Pierre says. So far, two $250 donations have shown up in campaign finance reports.What about the other guy in the governor's race? St. Pierre says the group has just drafted a letter to Mayor Martin O'Malley seeking his stance on the issue. "It seems like he would be as progressive as Ehrlich is," St. Pierre says, but acknowledges basing that assumption on the mayor's membership in a rock band. ("The mayor supports the state law," spokesman Rick Abbruzzese says.)If NORML likes what O'Malley has to say, the group will write him a check, too, St. Pierre says. It's not uncommon for some PACs to support rivals, but this one isn't used to having so many friends in high places."In 36 years here," St. Pierre says, "it's pretty rare we get both sides."Complete Article: http://tinyurl.com/fqoukSource: Baltimore Sun (MD)Author: Laura VozzellaPublished: August 23, 2006Copyright: 2006 The Baltimore SunContact: letters baltsun.comWebsite: http://www.baltimoresun.com/NORMLhttp://www.norml.org/CannabisNews NORML Archiveshttp://cannabisnews.com/news/list/NORML.shtml
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Comment #65 posted by FoM on August 24, 2006 at 06:37:43 PT
greenmed
Thank you. I love that song.
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Comment #64 posted by Had Enough on August 24, 2006 at 05:25:54 PT
#63
Cool Tune.It's too bad that many people do not understand.Round and Round we go.
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Comment #63 posted by greenmed on August 23, 2006 at 23:29:55 PT
For FoM, Flowers
Lyric from arlo.net:WHERE HAVE ALL THE FLOWERS GONE words and music by Pete Seegerperformed by Pete Seeger and Tao Rodriguez-SeegerWhere have all the flowers gone?Long time passingWhere have all the flowers gone?Long time agoWhere have all the flowers gone?Girls have picked them every oneWhen will they ever learn?When will they ever learn?
 
Where have all the young girls gone?Long time passingWhere have all the young girls gone?Long time agoWhere have all the young girls gone?Taken husbands every oneWhen will they ever learn?When will they ever learn?Where have all the young men gone?Long time passingWhere have all the young men gone?Long time agoWhere have all the young men gone?Gone for soldiers every oneWhen will they ever learn?When will they ever learn?Where have all the soldiers gone?Long time passingWhere have all the soldiers gone?Long time agoWhere have all the soldiers gone?Gone to graveyards every oneWhen will they ever learn?When will they ever learn?
 
 
 
Where have all the graveyards gone?Long time passingWhere have all the graveyards gone?Long time agoWhere have all the graveyards gone?Covered with flowers every oneWhen will we ever learn?When will we ever learn?1961 (Renewed) Fall River Music Inc
All Rights Reserved.
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Comment #62 posted by FoM on August 23, 2006 at 22:09:15 PT
greenmed 
It really is hard to believe how much time has gone by. 
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Comment #61 posted by greenmed on August 23, 2006 at 22:01:37 PT
FoM
Speaking of long time passing, it's difficult for me to imagine that little Amy Carter now has a seven-year-old of her own. How time flies.
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Comment #60 posted by FoM on August 23, 2006 at 21:35:32 PT
greenmed 
What a wonderful background he came from. Simple, hard working and kind. Where have all the flowers gone?
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Comment #59 posted by greenmed on August 23, 2006 at 21:25:44 PT
FoM
Yes, Lillian and James Sr. raised him well.http://www.cartercenter.org/aboutus/bio2.htmhttp://www.nursing.emory.edu/lccin/miss_lillian.shtml
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Comment #58 posted by FoM on August 23, 2006 at 20:51:00 PT
greenmed
I saw an interview with President Carter recently. He said the hostages release was already a done deal but it was held back until Reagan was in power so he could take the credit. Jimmy Carter didn't seem angry either when he said it. It was just a matter of fact.
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Comment #57 posted by FoM on August 23, 2006 at 20:47:39 PT
greenmed
You said: Mr. Carter was above that nastiness.Yes he is and was an honorable man. It's hard to fight Republicans if you don't want to become like them. 
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Comment #56 posted by greenmed on August 23, 2006 at 20:43:43 PT
FoM
The Iran issue at the time hurt his chances. I agree he didn't want war, nor did the country. I seem to recall Iran's releasing the hostages soon after Reagan was inaugurated. Back room dealings funding the Contras and illegal "wars." Statecraft can be a nasty business, and Mr. Carter was above that nastiness. He's a good person who continues to put his words into action.
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Comment #55 posted by FoM on August 23, 2006 at 20:18:54 PT
greenmed 
If only we could find a potential new president with President Carters integrity and honesty it would be a good thing. I barely remember Ford except his falling on SNL skits but I remember Jimmy Carter for his patience and for going to Three Mile Island after the almost meltdown. I remember him saying that the laws shouldn't be worse then the damage a substance causes or close to that. He was considered soft on the Iran hostage issue but we as a country were still hurting from Vietnam. We couldn't have handled another war.
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Comment #54 posted by greenmed on August 23, 2006 at 19:56:09 PT
FoM #52
I agree. He is also one of our most intelligent presidents.
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Comment #53 posted by FoM on August 23, 2006 at 17:29:08 PT
Sinsemilla Jones and Hope
I know there have been some people killed who were 100 percent innocent and those numbers I would like to know too. If people are dealing cocaine I don't know how to get any sympathy from society for them. I have seen people hurt by hard drugs and I can't get passed that myself. I can feel sorry for an innocent person being shot and killed but if they were dealing I think most people in that position should know the potential consequences and stop doing it. If they are addicted they really need to get help. Our country is jumpy to say the least and not making things worse on yourself with hard drugs is a smart thing to do. The war in Iraq is so different. A family can be asleep and trying to stay out of the war and get bombed. That is overwhelming to me. War for religion or power or oil is so wrong. 
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Comment #52 posted by FoM on August 23, 2006 at 16:32:00 PT
 rchandar
I believe history will recorded Jimmy Carter as the kindest, most honest president we have ever had. I love Jimmy Carter and his values.
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Comment #51 posted by rchandar on August 23, 2006 at 16:23:33 PT:
sinsemillia jones
It's my belief that Carter was the best president this country has ever had. All the other presidents, in my opinion, were power hungry d $#kheads who sacrificed every Constitutional precedent in the pursuit of personal power. Carter didn't do that. He was and is a very genuine man who cared about human beings. Capitol Hill and Corporate America just didn't like that, and savored his downfall from the very early days.All kudos to Jimmy, I hope he's working still with Habitat for Humanity.--rchandar
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Comment #50 posted by Sinsemilla Jones on August 23, 2006 at 16:21:34 PT
Hope - even the unobvious are obvious to us, but..
How many people have been shot when police have raided the wrong address?How many unarmed people have been shot when they raided the right address?How many innocent family members, roommates, and neighbors have been shot?There's cetainly no reason we shouldn't have clear data on those questions.
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Comment #49 posted by Sinsemilla Jones on August 23, 2006 at 16:06:16 PT
To tell you the truth, FoM.....
I believe Carter was sabotaged by elements of our own government in many ways, to set up the election of Reagan/Bush.But I also think members of his own party participated in that sabotage, either wittingly or unwittingly.
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Comment #48 posted by Sinsemilla Jones on August 23, 2006 at 15:44:57 PT
whig #45 - War IS insanity!
I whole heartedly agree!
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Comment #47 posted by FoM on August 23, 2006 at 14:12:20 PT
Sinsemilla Jones 
I didn't vote back then and I sure didn't care about politics. I just remember I liked Jimmy Carter because of what he said about marijuana decriminalization. When the hostages were taken marijuana became less important and the cocaine finished it I think.
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Comment #46 posted by Hope on August 23, 2006 at 14:09:24 PT
There's also disagreement on who would
claim some of the numbers. (aaarghh...dreadful numbers)We would say that an overdose is caused by prohibition...they wouldn't.But some of it is obvious and clear as day. Just have a look at the Drug War Victims page.There are so many, many more that could be listed on that page. 
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Comment #45 posted by whig on August 23, 2006 at 13:59:15 PT
Sinsemilla Jones #38
War is insanity.
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Comment #44 posted by Sinsemilla Jones on August 23, 2006 at 13:57:55 PT
I agree, Hope, we need a body count!
We've been quoting the expense in dollars for years, but it doesn't tell the whole story any more than the billions we've spent on Iraq tell the whole story there.If we could say that more innocent people have been killed by police prosecuting the Drug War than died in the Twin Towers, and have the figures to back it up, it might make an impression.
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Comment #43 posted by Sinsemilla Jones on August 23, 2006 at 13:49:44 PT
FoM
A lot of people still don't know that the real gateway is marijuana's illegality.We didn't know about hemp and med mj in the late 70s, but we knew it couldn't be all that harmful. The LaGuardia Report was over 3 decades old by then.Nixon's recrim could be forgiven on the gateway theory, because of the heroin use by our soldiers in Vietnam.I just find it hard to give any politicians any slack for doing the wrong thing.The irony, of course, is that cocaine was still expensive and hard to get under Carter, but became cheap and plentiful under Reagan.
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Comment #42 posted by FoM on August 23, 2006 at 13:34:45 PT
Hope
I haven't been interested in that part of our issue. People see hard drug dealers as violent money chasing people who will blow a person away when they don't pay their bill. It's not a pretty picture is why people aren't interested.Killing innocent women and children in their home land does upset many people. They are victims of our government and they can't get away from the bombs.
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Comment #41 posted by Hope on August 23, 2006 at 13:30:19 PT
Sensimilla Jones
We really need that body count. We really do. It would help to end this travesty of injustice called the WoD. I'm sure if anyone, anywhere knows...are even has a close idea...it's a closely guarded secret... to protect those who feed off the WoD.That count seems to be constantly growing, too...and to no good avail. It needs to end. Immediately.
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Comment #40 posted by Sinsemilla Jones on August 23, 2006 at 13:17:08 PT
Hope - The media never gives us a body count...
on the Drug War!Ted Koppel never has said, "Day 25,000 of America's War on Americans."No network gives us a rememberance of individuals who died in the cause.
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Comment #39 posted by FoM on August 23, 2006 at 13:08:37 PT
 Sinsemilla Jones 
It was way to new back then. People became worried that marijuana was a gateway drug. Remember no one knew about if it was or it wasn't. We know now but back then the cocaine ended it for marijuana decriminalization.
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Comment #38 posted by Sinsemilla Jones on August 23, 2006 at 13:02:29 PT
FoM
The cocaine use of Peter Bourne and accusations of such against Hamilton Jordan certainly made decrim more difficult, but the Democrats were still the majority for 4 years and could have gone ahead and done the right thing.Despite torture, ill-equiped troops, no WMDs, thousands of American dead, tens of thousands Iraqi dead, and popular opinion now 2 to 1 against it, the Republicans still haven't given up the Iraq War.
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Comment #37 posted by FoM on August 23, 2006 at 12:43:09 PT
Sinsemilla Jones 
I saw plenty of dead people during that time too. 
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Comment #36 posted by FoM on August 23, 2006 at 12:40:18 PT
Sinsemilla Jones 
Yes Carter was going to decriminalize marijuana then in came cocaine. End of story.
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Comment #35 posted by FoM on August 23, 2006 at 12:34:37 PT
Sinsemilla Jones
If those who are into politics understand that many people were crushed when the Kennedy's died and think why were they loved and try to be like them maybe the Democrats will have a chance. (I do not care about their personal life) Obama seems good. Gore has always been against going to war but he is doing more with global warming and really might not be interested in running. On the Republican side I don't see anyone of interest. I think McCain will be the one for the Republicans. He is such a diehard Republican that he doesn't know how to act it seems to me.
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Comment #34 posted by Hope on August 23, 2006 at 12:33:02 PT
I see dead people, too...
http://blogs.salon.com/0002762/stories/2003/08/17/drugWarVictims.html
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Comment #33 posted by Sinsemilla Jones on August 23, 2006 at 12:29:37 PT
I saw dead people as a kid.
Vietnam every day, JFK, RFK, MLK, Kent State, even the Olympics.The seventies, not only did we think marijuana would soon be legal, we thought we'd never have another Vietnam.The Democratic President and Congress we elected in 1976 were going to change all that for good.
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Comment #32 posted by FoM on August 23, 2006 at 12:09:35 PT
Whig
Dead people I see too. Everywhere there are dead people. I bet even a very young person has become accustomed to seeing dead people on tv. That de-sensitizes us. Don't vote or become active if you feel you can't. I never did get into politics and I have been around a lot longer then you. I really want Republicans out of power. They are the ones who benefit from war. Churches benefit from war because people get scared and go to church. 
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Comment #31 posted by Sinsemilla Jones on August 23, 2006 at 12:09:01 PT
It does all go back to the murder of JFK.
The mentors of those who have power now, secured their power then.The real challenge, if we are fortunate enough to have an electable enlightened candidate, will be keeping them alive.
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Comment #30 posted by Hope on August 23, 2006 at 11:54:28 PT
Primaries
As I understand it, you have to be a registered party member to vote in a primary and you can only vote in one party's primary,anywhere. Any registered voter can vote either way after the primaries.The only thing that can cause you to have your vote thrown out, other than skull duggery, is if you mark a straight ticket, then put a vote for a candidate, any candidate, somewhere on the ballot.Skull duggery looms it's nasty head over all of it, of course.
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Comment #29 posted by whig on August 23, 2006 at 11:50:41 PT
FoM
It comes down to this: I have very strong feelings about things. Sometimes I am wrong, though. I don't believe in forcing my beliefs on people. I want to use words and explanations and listen to all perspectives because there are many ways to misunderstand one another. But sometimes I learn something that changes my perspective.How terrible I would feel to have forced my belief on someone against their will -- and then discovered that my belief had been wrong in my own opinion?It's one thing to make a mistake like that in raising children, I think it's inevitable. Even on other adults as long as it's the kind of mistake that can be apologized for later.But I see dead people, FoM. People in Iraq and people in Yugoslavia. People in Lebanon and people in places that both parties have had a hand in. I can't take it back if I endorse that kind of mass murder. So I can't vote.I guess my question is, can I walk up to that ledge and stop? Can I register as a Democrat, vote in primaries, initiatives and referenda without ever voting to put a candidate in an office?I'm not sure I can. I really put a high moral threshhold on anything that approximates force, and I'd rather withhold than accidentally strike an irrevocable blow against a single innocent.
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Comment #28 posted by FoM on August 23, 2006 at 11:46:37 PT
Hope
You are looking for character and substance. I agree with that too. I don't like Mrs. Clinton and would sit out voting if she gets the nomination but if Gore is nominated I will vote. If Obama would run I would vote for him too.
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Comment #27 posted by Hope on August 23, 2006 at 11:44:44 PT
The main thing is that we do everything 
we can to become a power in and of ourselves. Register. Vote. Let them know what we think and where we're coming from and what we want and what we'll do as far as supporting them or not.If they see we are big enough to matter, they'll pay attention.
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Comment #26 posted by FoM on August 23, 2006 at 11:42:00 PT
whig
I like the way Progressives think. I loved the Kennedys. When JFK was assassinated I was so sad and upset. When his brother was killed it about ended any interest in the system because I almost felt that everyone I would like would be killed. I was young but that was one of the reasons I didn't care about politics.
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Comment #25 posted by Hope on August 23, 2006 at 11:39:54 PT
If they don't come up with someone
I think has got any sense...I'll "waste" my vote on Libertarian candidates again.The massacre of Murkowski, yesterday, will surely open a few eyes. Surely. It would be wonderful if someone like Kucinich, or even ex-governor Johnson, someone we could really stand behind with a good conscience, made it through the primaries.Show me the man or woman. Show me their heart. I don't care if they ride in on an elephant or a donkey...I just want to know who and what they really are.
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Comment #24 posted by FoM on August 23, 2006 at 11:37:12 PT
Sinsemilla Jones 
Did Dean really lose all his support because he screamed?I think he lost because of his brass demeanor. 
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Comment #23 posted by whig on August 23, 2006 at 11:36:07 PT
FoM
I was wrong to vote, when I did so as a Republican and as a Libertarian. I was wrong to vote when I would have done harm by my vote.I'm still thinking through my position now because when I decided I was a liberal I had a different perspective on the Democratic Party than I had before. It was an object of some hostility for me before, an adversary of truth. Because I wasn't seeing the net-roots of the Democratic Party, or whatever kinds of grass-roots there were before that and still exist. I was only ever familiar with Republican and Libertarian Party organization. I could write essays on either.But the point is I was alienated from those roots too, and so I was rootless, without a party. And now I can see a different way of relating, an idealistic altruism, balanced by realism. I don't like the establishment Democratic Party, the corporate funded elites that are Republicans-lite. But I do like the progressive blogosphere.
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Comment #22 posted by Hope on August 23, 2006 at 11:32:58 PT
I don't register with either one...
just let them sort themselves out and see what's left to choose from when they're through.
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Comment #21 posted by FoM on August 23, 2006 at 11:32:20 PT
Sinsemilla Jones 
He was killed.http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_F._Kennedy
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Comment #20 posted by Sinsemilla Jones on August 23, 2006 at 11:32:08 PT
FoM's voting is what I think is fortunate, btw.
Not the voting structure. That's very unfortunate.That's true, Hope. Sometimes even the voters participate in the dirty tricks the politicians play.
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Comment #19 posted by Hope on August 23, 2006 at 11:31:38 PT
Why would anyone feel a need to stoop that low?
Win at all costs? Cunning? Obsessiveness?I'm not sure. But I do know that it's done. 
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Comment #18 posted by FoM on August 23, 2006 at 11:25:28 PT
Hope
Why would anyone feel a need to stoop that low? Politics are just a tool not a religion or anything. I don't believe in dirty fighting.
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Comment #17 posted by Sinsemilla Jones on August 23, 2006 at 11:24:17 PT
I don't think it's unfortunate!
Some say that voting only encourages them, but half the people not voting certainly doesn't seem to have discouraged them any.I hope and pray the Democrats give me someone I can vote for this time around, but barring the miracle of an anti-Iraq/pot/people war Republican candidate, I'll be voting with you against them.I'll probably be voting in the Democratic Presidential primary as well, as I did last time, if Dennis Kucinich or someone like him is running.But I can't vote for any candidate who doesn't flatly state that they are for ending the war, and who at the very least supports our farmers right to grow hemp and a state's right to legalize medical marijuana.Michael Badnarik, the Libertarian, did both those things and more for me in 2004, but John Kerry did neither.I guess what bothers me the most about the Democratic Party is that the 2 times in my life that they should have given us a strong anti-war candidate, 1968 and 2004, they didn't.Frankly, I suspect the same voting fraud that gave Bush the last 2 elections, may have given his Skull&Bones brother Kerry the nomination in 2004.Why was Edwards ready to challenge the vote, but Kerry shied away?Did Dean really lose all his support because he screamed?Forgive me, FoM, but I just can't trust anyone who has shared power in the establishment.
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Comment #16 posted by Hope on August 23, 2006 at 11:21:13 PT
Voting structure...
There are actually people... and I know this to be true, that register with the party they don't like so that they can vote in that party's primary so that they can vote for the candidate that they perceive would be the weakest in the final election against their own true candidate.Tricky stuff.
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Comment #15 posted by FoM on August 23, 2006 at 10:41:27 PT
Sinsemilla Jones 
I don't trust the voting structure anymore. Between Gore and Kerry two times is too much. I want to become a Democrats so when it comes time to vote for a President I will be able to vote in the primary. I don't like politics. I don't believe politics but I must do this just this one time if never after 2008. I am so consumed with what this administration has done to our country my passive nature is really riled up. My husband will say she is easy going but don't trip her trigger. My trigger has been tripped unfortunately.
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Comment #14 posted by Sinsemilla Jones on August 23, 2006 at 10:29:21 PT
I don't believe much about anything in politics
You're way ahead of the game, FoM!In a general election your vote should ALWAYS count, no matter who you vote for or what party you are or are not affiliated with. You should even be able to write in a candidate.Party primary elections, which determine the party candidates for a general election, however, follow the rules of the political party. They are basically private affairs, but they use public facillities and tend to invite the public at large to vote. Usually party affiliation is ignored, but one is not allowed to vote in both the Republican and Democratic primaries for the same election.I believe in some states, though, your party affiliation can bar you from voting in a different party's primary, but it can never bar you from voting in a general election or for whoever you chose.
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Comment #13 posted by FoM on August 23, 2006 at 10:02:32 PT
A New 1986 Video from LWW Today
http://www.neilyoung.com/lwwtoday/index.htmlhttp://www.neilyoung.com/lwwtoday/lwwvideos/aroundtheworld_wm.html
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Comment #12 posted by FoM on August 23, 2006 at 09:47:51 PT
Sinsemilla Jones 
I don't believe much about anything in politics. I will be careful. I am registering as a Democrat after this falls election. I worry if I switch from Independent to Democrat because of Blackwell my vote might not count. I don't trust Blackwell after what he did in Ohio to us with Kerry. I have given this a lot of thought and prayer.
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Comment #11 posted by Sinsemilla Jones on August 23, 2006 at 09:42:46 PT
Politics 100, FoM -
Don't believe the hype!Perceptions are what they build to get votes. The reality is often very different.I may be a man, but I'm against war, for medical marijuana, against poverty, and for the elderly, too. We're both for the people, but we perceive different political paths to that end.If only we could find a political party that could get around the semantics. Be nice to find a religion like that, too.But, as you know, there are some female Libertarians. I hope NORML can throw a little money Loretta's way.Alabama Democrats seem to want to be perceived as Republican Christians, or as Nall puts it - Alabamastan Talibanicrats form New Coalition.
Lorretta's blog
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Comment #10 posted by Hope on August 23, 2006 at 09:02:59 PT
Comment 6
Hurray! I'm so glad! Now let's hope they don't get someone just like him or worse.
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Comment #9 posted by FoM on August 23, 2006 at 08:51:46 PT
Sinsemilla Jones
I don't follow politics. I will now because of the invasion of Iraq. I don't like right leaning political parties because they are guy oriented and leave out women's concerns. I think our issues are important too. Like end the war and allow medical marijuana. Help the inner cities before they just decay away. We desperately need health care for everyone like most countries have. We need care for seniors in nursing homes. They will take their homes if they have to go into a nursing home. That's wrong. Homes should be passed on to the family not the government. We pay taxes our whole lives and can wind up with nothing in the end. It's very sad to see farms and houses auctioned off for the reasons I mentioned.
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Comment #8 posted by Sinsemilla Jones on August 23, 2006 at 08:42:03 PT
I share your distaste for most Republicans, FoM...
I think a sitting Republican governor getting only 19% of the vote in the REPUBLICAN PRIMARY is hilarious.I think a lot of conservative libertarians have been fooled by the Republican Party in the past, but are waking up.I also think a lot of liberal progressives have been fooled by the Democratic Party in the past, and are waking up.I'm proud to be liberal, conservative, libertarian, and progressive. I think the disparaging of the word liberal by so-called conservatives was a very un-conservative thing to do. I would hate to see this done to any of these terms again, as they are all positive when not taken to excess.As for libertarian with a capital l, the Libertarian Party has supported the legalization of marijuana for at least 25 years.As for Frank Murkowski, Rest In Pieces!
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Comment #7 posted by FoM on August 23, 2006 at 07:36:46 PT
ekim
Maybe they will. That would be great. Someone named Knowles won the Democratic primary with 73 percent of the vote! Alaska Governor Loses Bid for 2nd Termhttp://seattlepi.nwsource.com/national/1134AP_Primary_Elections.html
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Comment #6 posted by ekim on August 23, 2006 at 07:30:13 PT
well the governor in Alaska lost big time
maybe Norml will be able to help up there
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Comment #5 posted by FoM on August 23, 2006 at 07:27:54 PT
Sinsemilla Jones
I just don't like the word. It doesn't mean liberal. For a long time I thought it did. I like liberal and progressive. It seems too close to republicans and their ideology. I think there are many people that want to see the right out and the left in.Thanks for explaining what PAC means.
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Comment #4 posted by Sinsemilla Jones on August 23, 2006 at 07:09:06 PT
PAC -
Political Action Committee
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Comment #3 posted by Sinsemilla Jones on August 23, 2006 at 07:07:41 PT
What's wrong with the word libertarian?
libertarian1 : an advocate of the doctrine of free will2 a : a person who upholds the principles of individual liberty especially of thought and action b capitalized : a member of a political party advocating libertarian principles- Merriam-Webster Online
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Comment #2 posted by FoM on August 23, 2006 at 06:54:16 PT
PAC 
What does PAC stand for?
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Comment #1 posted by FoM on August 23, 2006 at 06:43:36 PT
Libertarian Streak
That's about the only thing I didn't like in this article. I don't mind the word liberal or progressive though.
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