cannabisnews.com: Knabe Targets Marijuana Dispensaries





Knabe Targets Marijuana Dispensaries
Posted by CN Staff on May 25, 2005 at 07:48:12 PT
By Shirley Hsu, Staff Writer
Source: Whittier Daily News
California -- Medical marijuana dispensaries in unincorporated areas of Los Angeles County could face regulations for the first time under a proposal submitted by county Supervisor Don Knabe.The Board of Supervisors will vote Tuesday on creating zoning regulations on marijuana dispensaries to ensure they do not have negative impacts on surrounding neighborhoods, Knabe said in a prepared statement.
"It is imperative that these facilities not be located near homes or schools and that neighbors be notified of the intent to open such facilities,' he said.The action comes as two medical marijuana advocates seek to open a dispensary in the unincorporated community of Hacienda Heights.Residents are concerned about the dispensary's possible location within a mile of an elementary school, a middle school, two parks and the library. Kris Hermes, spokesman for Americans for Safe Access, a medical marijuana advocacy group, said the organization embraces "reasonable regulations' on medical marijuana dispensaries."Generally, ordinances that are adopted are a positive sign that the city or county has taken steps to regulate safe access for medical marijuana patients,' Hermes said.However, the organization disapproves of moves to cap the number of dispensaries allowed in a city or county, and of regulations limiting their location, Hermes said.Someone wishing to open a business in an unincorporated county area must first go through the county's Regional Planning Department for zoning approval. Certain businesses, including restaurants and others concerning the public, must then obtain business licenses.But no one has ever applied to open a medical marijuana dispensary in an unincorporated county area, and there are now no zoning regulations that deal with them, said John Calas, administrator for the county's land use regulation division.A California state law passed in 1996 protects patients who grow and use marijuana for medical purposes, but federal law prohibits the drug. In recent years, several California cities have banned, passed moratoriums on, or enacted regulations on dispensaries.Several cities, including Pasadena, looked to the Northern California city of Rocklin's report citing complaints of illegal drug dealing and petty crime surrounding existing dispensaries in other cities.Note: Supervisor Proposes Zoning Regulations.Source: Whittier Daily News (CA)Author: Shirley Hsu, Staff WriterPublished: May 24, 2005Copyright: 2005 MediaNews Group, Inc.Contact: steve.scauzillo sgvn.comWebsite: http://www.whittierdailynews.com/Americans For Safe Accesshttp://www.safeaccessnow.org/CannabisNews Medical Marijuana Archives http://cannabisnews.com/news/list/medical.shtml
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Comment #24 posted by Nick Thimmesch on May 26, 2005 at 11:40:08 PT:
If these cops think THEY have problems..
"Pasadena Police took a pro-active stance and approached the City Council, requesting the ban, saying clubs elsewhere had attracted criminal elements."This is a RE-ACTIVE stance, not a PRO-ACTIVE stance. Like the police in Columbia, Missouri, the Pasadena Police refuse to enforce the pro-cannabis law. THESE West By Gawd Virginia cops have REAL problems:Man Arrested for Wearing Grinch Mask May 26, 11:47 AM (ET)WHEELING, W.Va. (AP) - City and county attorneys are defending Wheeling police who arrested a man for wearing a Grinch mask while walking along a city street.Norman Eugene Gray, 42, was arrested Tuesday. He was arraigned and released on a personal recognizance bond.Officers saw Gray about 8:45 a.m. Tuesday, told him to take the mask off and not put it on again. Gray removed it and asked why he could not wear it, according to Wheeling police reports. Officers told him wearing masks in public is illegal.Gray said he felt he had a right to wear it and said it was not illegal. He put the mask back on and was arrested. The mask was confiscated.Wheeling City Solicitor Rosemary Humway-Warmuth and Ohio County Prosecutor Scott Smith said masks as well as dark window tinting in vehicles can pose a safety hazard to law enforcement officers and hinder efforts to identify criminal suspects."When we think about masks, we don't always think of Halloween," Humway-Warmuth said.Smith said wearing a mask or hood in public is a misdemeanor under state law, punishable by a fine of up to $500 or up to a year in jail, or both. Children up to 16 years old can wear masks. Traditional Halloween masks, safety gear used in occupations, theatrical productions, civil defense or protection from bad weather also are legal.THIMMESCH's take: the cops are allowed to wear pigs masks, ain't they?
http://apnews.myway.com/article/20050526/D8AAUV9G0.html
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Comment #23 posted by afterburner on May 25, 2005 at 20:28:32 PT
RE-ACTIVE, not PRO-ACTIVE 
"Pasadena Police took a pro-active stance and approached the City Council, requesting the ban, saying clubs elsewhere had attracted criminal elements."This is a RE-ACTIVE stance, not a PRO-ACTIVE stance. Like the police in Columbia, Missouri, the Pasadena Police refuse to enforce the pro-cannabis law. Instead they react against the will of the majority of voters and attempt to turn the tide back to prohibition. 
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Comment #22 posted by FoM on May 25, 2005 at 18:28:33 PT
Max Flowers
I can only imagine the demand. I stayed in West Hollywood for 2 weeks and during that time I went into center city LA and all around Orange County. There are so many people. Six lanes of traffic if I remember correctly. I can see why the demand is high because the population is huge!
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Comment #21 posted by Max Flowers on May 25, 2005 at 18:10:15 PT
FoM - CA consumption
Hi FoM, well one reason that it may be hard for you to grasp what's up here in CA is just the sheer amount of demand for it. Even if they had a massive warehouse for a whole city's needs, that would only take care of a brief moment's demand, and then it would run out and they'd be right back to empty shelves (jars) again. You just can't believe how many people need and want their medicine on a daily basis. It's staggering. Dispensaries barely put a dent in the needs of a community, yet there are all these forces who are in fear of them and are trying to limit them heavily.Their problem is irrational fear and conditioning. They have believed in the propaganda and stigma for so long that even when they see with their own eyes the reality that medical cannabis is here and is not causing anyone real problems, they refuse to believe it and prefer to cling to fear and lies.
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Comment #20 posted by FoM on May 25, 2005 at 18:04:58 PT
Rick Steves
He does look like an honest person. I liked his long hair when he was younger too. 
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Comment #19 posted by mayan on May 25, 2005 at 18:02:00 PT
Steves
I just watched Rick Steves. He seems like a totally honest man who can give American tourists information regarding EVERYTHING they can expect in Europe. He didn't hold anything back. Makes me want to get one of his books and travel! THE WAY OUT IS THE WAY IN...Giuliani faces protest:
http://www.timesargus.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050523/NEWS/505230354/0/FRONTPAGEThe 9/11 COMMISSION v. 19 NAMED MUSLIMS:
A TRIAL IN ABSENTIA:
http://www.karlschwarz.com/absentia.htmlStar Wars III: Crisis in America - Hollywood Strikes Back - Rolls Out Big-Budget 9/11 Truth Movie:
http://www.911truth.org/article.php?story=20050523120138581The 9/11 Commission Report: A 571-Page Lie - by Dr. David Ray Griffin:
http://www.911truth.org/article.php?story=20050523112738404
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Comment #18 posted by FoM on May 25, 2005 at 17:46:00 PT
Hope
Yes he did say that about the cost of a joint. I never heard of him before ( except he is on NORML's Board ) but I am not a world traveler. I travel around my farm but that's about as far as I go anymore. Sometimes I get on the tractor and travel around the farm for fun! LOL!
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Comment #17 posted by Hope on May 25, 2005 at 17:32:06 PT
Rick Steves
Saw it!He didn't talk about policy, but did give the price of a joint in a coffee shop and said that such information is in his books.
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Comment #16 posted by FoM on May 25, 2005 at 16:57:22 PT
Rick Steves Will Be On 60 Minutes!
Heads Up: 60 Minutes Tonight http://www.cbsnews.com/sections/60II/main3475.shtmlAbout Rick Steves: http://www.norml.org/index.cfm?Group_ID=5530
 
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Comment #15 posted by global_warming on May 25, 2005 at 16:26:16 PT
ot:Rove
washingtonpost.com
Frontline: Karl Rove -- The ArchitectMichael Kirk
Producer
Wednesday, April 13, 2005; 11:00 AMPresident George W. Bush called him "the architect" of his reelection victory and he has been the president's chief strategist from the beginning. But Karl Rove is much more than a political guru, he is the single most powerful policy advisor in the White House. Frontline and The Washington Post joined forces to trace the political history and modus operandi of the man who has been on the inside of every political and policy decision of the Bush administration, including the current battles on Social Security, taxes, and tort reform. For Rove -- observers say -- enactment of the Bush agenda is a way to win the biggest prize of all: a permanent Republican majority.Consult "Karl Rove -- The Architect" for program information. Producer Michael Kirk was online Wednesday, April 13, at 11 a.m. ET to discuss the report.A transcript follows.Editor's Note: Washingtonpost.com moderators retain editorial control over Live Online discussions and choose the most relevant questions for guests and hosts; guests and hosts can decline to answer questions._____________Washington, D.C.: Do you have any idea on what's the next step for Rove?Michael Kirk: From his powerful position in the White House I'm certain he will continue to have a hand in policy and politics surrounding the efforts by President Bush to leave a large footprint on the nature of government and individuals in this country. That of course includes a formidable domestic agenda and daunting challenges internationally. In addition he will no doubt play an important role in the 2006 midterm election campaign and it would not surprise many observers if almost every Republican presidential hopeful at one point or another passed through Karl Rove's office on their way to the primaries in 2008._______________________Dallas, Tex.: How is it that someone as overtly political as Karl Rove -- the "chief architect" of Bush's reelection campaign -- is paid by the taxpayers for running a campaign and trying to create a permanent GOP majority? Why should my tax dollars go to put a political strategist on the government payroll? Are there any restrictions on this?Michael Kirk: Mr. Rove is unique in recent political memorandum as both a political strategist and a policy guru, his skills in the later category are at least as important as his political skills. Add to that his personal relationship and understanding of the goals of the president and it may well be that the taxpayers are getting a pretty good deal for their dollar._______________________Houston, Tex.: I found Rove's strategy of "attacking the opponent's strength" fascinating. Do you see recent examples of Democrats co-opting this strategy?Michael Kirk: Most experienced political strategists have studied greek heros...and know about strength also being weakness...whether they have the skill and willingness to utilize this knowledge is another matter._______________________Annandale, Va.: I was surprised to learn how involved Rove was in politics from early on. He is obviously an ambitious guy. My question is why does someone who is so politically smart (not that I agree with his politics) stand in the shadows of presidents instead of running for POTUS himself? Any clue?Michael Kirk: The people we talked to about rove like to tell stories that he could have chosen either path...my sense from months of thinking about him and talking to as many people as possible about him is that he likes the behind-the-scenes role...where he has time to strategize and think matters through in a way that is free of the demands of public appearances (though we've all seen a lot more of him lately than in the past)._______________________Sterling, VA: In your opinion, how accurate is the book (and movie) "Bush's Brain"?Michael Kirk: I read portions of "Bush's Brain"...I never saw the documentary. Often, when I'm working on a subject I like to read about them, and prefer primary sources (people who actually know them) to having my conclusions "infected" (for lack of a better word) by the in-depth work of others (especially documentary filmmakers)._______________________Vancouver, B.C.: Has Karl Rove been able to identify and mobilize a natural conservatism of the American people? We read that the right-wing now has disproportionate power, but it appears as though Rove may have just checkmated a disproportionate Democratic Party dominance in the post-war era.Michael Kirk: Many observers of the American political system that we talked to believe the nation has always had a healthy strain of libertarian conservatism. They were not as surprised as many in the media by the "red-state phenomenon" in the last few election cycles. Karl Rove, I think, was among the earliest to understand and capitalize on this trend in american politics._______________________Athens, Ga.: What ideology drives Rove? He doesn't appear to be a religious man, but he hammers socially conservative issues in order to win elections. The national security issue was handed to him on a platter and seems to spring more from the neocons who are influential in the administration. Does he just take advantage of ideologically motivated people in order to help those he favors into power? Is it personal ambition? Other than a dominant one, what kind of Republican party would Rove most want?Michael Kirk: Your questions form the heart of every recent inquiry into karl rove. In our report we came to understand his ideology as a combination of Barry Goldwater's common sense conservatism, with a strong dose of Ronald Reagan's ideas...and of course, the philosophy articulated by president bush himself. As to religion--the people we interviewed did not sense that Karl Rove is himself deeply religious in the way, for example, that President Bush is...but they all say rove is quite effective talking with and understanding religious conservatives. I believe Karl Rove's Republican party in the future would be one that was much like the current party with the addition of younger people (hence some policies as part of the social security debate), Catholics, women, African-Americans, and, perhaps most essentially, Hispanics._______________________Reno, Nev.: My impression of Rove is that he's a ruthless megalomaniac... what's yours...?Michael Kirk: I have been observing individuals involved in public behavior for a long time...they are, like the rest of us, complicated. rarely are they as simple as you suggest Mr. Rove is...and in his case, those we talked to who have been observing him for decades say that being in the midst of the rough and tumble of many important policy and political choices during his long career--Mr. Rove has revealed many sides to his personality and a variety of motivations for his behavior._______________________Atlanta, Ga.: So, does Karl Rove have a personal life?
What are the influences that shape his
views?Michael Kirk: We talked to many people who know him well. They told us that he has a stable personal life with his wife and son...that he is a type-a workaholic...but that he is often seen at his child's school. Mr. Rove is, according to those who know him, a voracious reader, a student of political history, and loves to talk about politics and political behavior in great detail._______________________Denton, Tex.: I know that the Swiftboat Vets were funded, at least partially by rich Texans who were friendly to the Bush campaign. But has any proof arisen that Rove was actually behind the Swiftboats?Michael Kirk: The efforts by journalists and the democrats to directly connect Karl Rove and the Bush-Cheney campaign to the Swift Boat Veterans have not yielded, as far as I know, any evidence that supports that allegation. Of course, there have been reports that indicate Rove would not have had to have direct contact with the 527 groups since many of them have, at one time or another, worked with or around Karl Rove._______________________Charlotte, N.C.: Hypothetically, if the election had gone Kerry's way, what would Rove be doing now? Riding that golden parachute known as being a lobbyist?Michael Kirk: I've actually asked this question of many who think they know the answer. Some have said he would be happiest working on his undergraduate degree, then a doctorate in political history. He would surely make an interesting addition to a university faculty somewhere, someday._______________________Cambridge, Mass: Is Rove behind Bush's gingerly approach to immigration, in the hopes of winning over Hispanics. Has the policy of courting Hispanics proven efficacious?Michael Kirk: Some of the reporters we worked with from the Washington Post and the political observers we met in Ttexas say the immigration issue is critical if the republicans are to maintain a durable majority in the next decade and beyond. I we know that, you can bet Karl Rove and the president do too--and that policies are being forwarded that will address that important issue._______________________Evanston Ill.: Would Rove really look so smart or Bush have been re-elected in the absence of 9/11? Even so, Bush had an 80+% approval post 9/11 reduced to about 51% at re-election and down to record lows (for him) now? So was it the event or was it Rove's celebrated brain?Michael Kirk: Very good question...one that is fun to argue about...clearly both things are true--the administration believes the president's leadership skills, demonstrated, from their point of view, after 9/11 were a big reason for his victory. Of course,Mr. Rove's formidable campaign machine didn't hurt either._______________________Lynchburg, Va.: Does it seem to you that Karl Rove, and successful Republican campaign strategists in general (Lee Atwater also comes to mind when asking this question) tend to evoke far more negative reactions from the other side than successful Democrat strategists such as James Carville and Paul Begala? For example, it seems that Republicans such as Rove are more likely to be described as ruthless, while Democrats such as Carville are more likely to be described as hard-hitting. These two descriptions can often be used interchangeably, but one obviously has a far more negative connotation than the other one. Have you ever noticed the same thing?Michael Kirk: It evokes the old axiom--where you stand is where you sit. I've heard many Republicans describe James Carville as "ruthless" (among other things)...Rove occupies a different place than a Carville or Atwater...because of his policy role...so the adjectives applied to him take on a different meaning...and a perception by some, that the president is something of an "empty vessel" has led to calling rove a "svengali"...(a name never, as far as i know, applied to carville or atwater...)..._______________________Baltimore, Md.: Although I am a Democrat, I have immense respect for Rove's clarity, ability to resonate populist beliefs, and impose a finely tuned organizational model on campaigns. His strategic and tactical approach to politics is nearly identical to the way a forward-thinking executive would manage a business. The way he manages campaigns seems fairly intuitive though. From your experience, would you characterize presidential campaigns as being historically unorganized and lacking focus?Michael Kirk: It was very interesting to talk with Mark Mckinnon, Mathew Dowd and Ken Mehlman about the chaos of campaigning and how Karl Rove managed it. He was, as you indicate, the extremely focused on details and completely interested in control._______________________Pittsburgh, Pa.: Why was there no discussion of Rove falsely accusing the opponent of a gubernatorial candidate he was working for of planting an electronic microphone in his office?Also why were there few interviews of liberal critics of Rove, such as Max Cleland, amongst all the conservative admirers of him?Michael Kirk: The alleged wire tap incident you describe--while a well known story about Rove--wasn't something time would allow us to include in our broadcast.When we make one of our political biographies we try to interview primary sources close to the subject in order to arrive at a deeper understanding of the motivations and actions of the subject. Interviewing political opponents would reveal, from my perspective, less useful information of a partisan nature._______________________Munich, Germany: Is Karl Rove present when Rice, Rumsfeld, Goss or Negroponte give the President their briefings? How much influence does Karl Rove have on policy in the White House these days?Michael Kirk: Not entirely sure about Rove's presence in all meetings. Those we interviewed said that he would have a direct hand in most of the domestic policy matters and would certaintly be available to advise on international matters if the president wanted him to...he has, as we reported, a larger brief than during the first term--the dimensions of that brief as probably being defined in different ways almost every day in the West Wing..._______________________New Haven, Conn.: Are you saying that Rove doesn't have an undergraduate degree or is that a typo?How do you see Rove's role evolving for future neocon political leaders? Do you think he will sabotage McCain's bid for president in 2008 like he sabotaged his primary run in South Carolina in 2000?Michael Kirk: Karl Rove did not graduate from college. As we reported in our program last night he was hooked on politics in the late 60s and early '70s, dropped out of college (the University of Utah) and eventually became chairman of the College Republicans during the Nixon administration in Washington.I would assume Mr. Rove will, at some point, have influence--directly or indirectly, on every potential Republican candidate, including Senator Mccain._______________________Michael Kirk: Thank you all for your questions and for supporting Frontline and PBS...we exist to provide serious journalism at a time when that is in short supply...and we could not exist without you. 
Rove
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Comment #14 posted by BGreen on May 25, 2005 at 15:47:58 PT
The Government Will Just Screw It Up
Any regulation and government oversight will just screw everything up because the government and its cronies are absolutely INCOMPETENT!They just need to LEAVE PEOPLE ALONE!Jeesh.The Reverend Bud Green
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Comment #13 posted by FoM on May 25, 2005 at 15:47:23 PT
Toker00
I just don't know the answers. I think the club issue in California is way bigger then my small town mind can comprehend. I know one thing. If we lose in the Supreme Court how will they go about trying to shut down ALL the Cannabis Clubs? It could get bad for everyone concerned. The best thing would be to let Angel win and then the kinks could be worked out without the problems that a no in the ruling would create. If they ever hoped to get CA as a Red State they would shoot themselves in the foot if they don't rule favorably in Angel's case. 
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Comment #12 posted by Toker00 on May 25, 2005 at 15:39:11 PT
FoM
Hmmm...maybe like a regional grower? For a certain area? If everyone is allowed to possess the same amount of Cannabis for medicine, just grow for those in a paricular area, and increase the grow as new patients are added to that area, maybe? Gosh, I really don't know. How can sometning so simple become so complex? People need medicine, get them the medicine. Over regulation complicates the simplicity. How many people can one caregiver grow for now? I forgot. Sobriety does that to me. : )Peace. Legalize, then Revolutionize!(medicine)(energy)(nutrition) 
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Comment #11 posted by FoM on May 25, 2005 at 14:59:59 PT
Toker00 
You have a very good idea too but how would they pick who would get to do the growing? 
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Comment #10 posted by FoM on May 25, 2005 at 14:58:47 PT
Heads Up: 60 Minutes Tonight
I can't find anything on the CBS link but Rick Steves is scheduled to be on 60 Minutes tonight according to a NORML announcement. He will visit a few Coffee Shops in Amsterdam. I hope it isn't bumped like they do.http://www.cbsnews.com/sections/60II/main3475.shtmlAbout Rick Steves: http://www.norml.org/index.cfm?Group_ID=5530
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Comment #9 posted by Toker00 on May 25, 2005 at 14:50:13 PT
FoM
I agree one hundred percent with the community gardening idea. Besides, people need their nedicine now, not years down the round after all the hoops have been jumped through. Why don't they allow one grower to grow for everyone? Open up a big warehouse somewhere, set up and grow, grow, grow! Let the police do their job and protect the place. I see nothing at all wrong with allowing pharmecies to dispense. That makes since to me.Peace. Legaize, then Revolutionize!(medicine)(energy)(nutrition)
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Comment #8 posted by FoM on May 25, 2005 at 13:54:02 PT
Related News Article from WeHoNews.com
 Editorial: Medical Marijuana Is Here To Stay  How to Mollify Neighbors and Keep the City Safe? Wednesday, May 25, 2005http://wehonews.blogspot.com/2005/05/52505-editorial-medical-marijuana-is.html
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Comment #7 posted by FoM on May 25, 2005 at 12:23:16 PT
Regulation and Medical
Since the news about the clubs seems to be all there is I have been thinking about the big picture. We need to re-schedule marijuana now because we know it has medical properties. We also need to make it like our current laws on alcohol. People should be allowed the same option as those who can brew beer in their home. I don't know how much a person can home brew and maybe someone knows the amount and could post it. Why does it seem so simple to me. If communities could have a garden and everyone helped out it would be a place that could benefit people in more ways then just a way to get medical cannabis. You would meet people at the community garden and you would talk and find out how life is going for them. Maybe you would find out someone was having a hard time paying a bill and people could give them a little money to help. Helping each other is the way a society grows and truly blooms. I see such benefits and they are still only a dream and I don't know why anymore.
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Comment #6 posted by FoM on May 25, 2005 at 11:06:29 PT
If Cannabis Was Treated Like Alcohol
Then children wouldn't have easy access to it. It's the illegal status of marijuana that makes it easy for kids to get. How many adults would risk buying alcohol for a minor? Not any that I know of. It is very hard for children to get their hands on alcohol or cigarettes. It would be hard for them to get Cannabis too. 
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Comment #5 posted by runderwo on May 25, 2005 at 10:44:53 PT
Unbelievable
"Just the wrong place for impressionable children to learn that a drug their parents tell them to steer clear of is being freely dispensed in their neighborhood to folks who have a doctor's note."I guess these people have a problem with pharmacies too?"However, reports out of Northern California indicate the clubs there have proved to be not-so-swell neighbors, geared more toward routine marijuana users, even allowing use on the premises."Are they making any kind of a claim here? What is the problem with a medical user being a "routine marijuana user" and "allowing use on the premises", presumably if it is behind closed doors?"Such loose rules and operation need to be tightened if the general public is to be convinced that such dispensaries are anything more than an end-run around laws forbidding the possession, sale and cultivation of marijuana."Seems like the general public is convinced - they voted for Prop 215 after all?" Pasadena Police took a pro-active stance and approached the City Council, requesting the ban, saying clubs elsewhere had attracted criminal elements."Commerce of any kind attracts criminal elements. Prohibition creates criminal elements. I don't see what claim, if any, is being made here."It is a good first step in protecting our neighborhoods."FROM WHAT?!"For our part, if physicians feel marijuana is the proper prescription, we'd rather see it's distribution be through pharmacies, accustomed to handling narcotics and other mood-altering drugs, not storefronts that appear to set up their own rules and regulations,"SO WOULD WE! ARGH! RESCHEDULE CANNABIS AND THERE WOULD BE NO PROBLEM!"including the selling of hashish as reportedly occurred in one location."Unbelievable! I suppose these people are COMPLETELY OBLIVIOUS that hashish has been used for CENTURIES as a medical preparation prior to the US prohibition? On one side you have people bitching that people shouldn't be using the "raw, impure drug" or whatnot, and then on the other side, you have people complaining when the preparations are too pure! I just can't grok these people." Cultivation, dispensing and use need tighter controls. And those who genuinely need the drug to deal with nausea or chronic pain ought to welcome the distinction between them and those who just want a legal means and place to get high."And you would find that we all agree with that last statement, not for any of the asinine reasons that this article stated, but so we can just be left alone and minimize the bother to others.
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Comment #4 posted by FoM on May 25, 2005 at 09:08:17 PT
Just a Question
I appreciate the medical marijuana movement and all that it has accomplished but I have a question. How did the cannabis clubs grow at such a rapid rate? I thought in big cities it would be harder to open up a business unless all the rules for a business were met but I am only guessing on this because I am not from a big town. Why can't a community garden be at least a possibility?
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Comment #3 posted by FoM on May 25, 2005 at 08:45:24 PT
KTVU Video Report
http://www.ktvu.com/index.html
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Comment #2 posted by dongenero on May 25, 2005 at 08:20:13 PT
how about pharmacies?
Could you imagine if they limited Walgreens to 5 pharmacies per town? 
 
Jeez, near me ther is a Walgreens every half mile in any direction. They are obviously well stocked with some VERY dangerous drugs. Hey, I'm just thinking of the children that are in the nearby schools.Plus their architecture is a nuisance in my opinion.
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Comment #1 posted by FoM on May 25, 2005 at 08:13:37 PT
Related Article from The Whittier Daily News 
Is Neighborhood Going To Pot?EditorialMay 24, 2005The county should take another look at locating a medical marijuana dispensary in the heart of Hacienda Heights, an unincorporated area in the east San Gabriel Valley that sits adjacent to north Whittier.The proposed "cannabis club' would be less than a mile from two elementary schools, two parks and the community library. Just the wrong place for impressionable children to learn that a drug their parents tell them to steer clear of is being freely dispensed in their neighborhood to folks who have a doctor's note.If this were a regular, regulated medical clinic, there might be little outcry or fear. However, reports out of Northern California indicate the clubs there have proved to be not-so-swell neighbors, geared more toward routine marijuana users, even allowing use on the premises. Such loose rules and operation need to be tightened if the general public is to be convinced that such dispensaries are anything more than an end-run around laws forbidding the possession, sale and cultivation of marijuana.Doctors declared and the people of California agreed in 1996 that those who needed the drug ought to be allowed to use marijuana. But since the Compassionate Use Act was enacted to allow marijuana use for those with AIDS, anorexia, arthritis, cancer, chronic pain, glaucoma, migraines and more, the issue of just how to dispense it has been mired in federal courts.The federal government maintains the distribution and possession of marijuana is illegal under any circumstances. Monday U.S. Supreme Court justices heard arguments in a California case that will determine if patients here and in 10 other states can continue to use marijuana.Regardless of the court's decision, the Legislature should enact needed uniform regulation. Until then, cities such as Pasadena, that recently instituted a temporary ban on such marijuana distributing centers, are right to take a wait-and-see attitude.Pasadena Police took a pro-active stance and approached the City Council, requesting the ban, saying clubs elsewhere had attracted criminal elements. We would have liked to see the same arguments from Sheriff Lee Baca and Supervisor Don Knabe in whose district the club is proposed. Knabe announced yesterday he will pursue zoning guidelines for such clubs. It is a good first step in protecting our neighborhoods. Until they are in place, the county should delay establishing any cannabis dispensaries.For our part, if physicians feel marijuana is the proper prescription, we'd rather see it's distribution be through pharmacies, accustomed to handling narcotics and other mood-altering drugs, not storefronts that appear to set up their own rules and regulations, including the selling of hashish as reportedly occurred in one location.Cultivation, dispensing and use need tighter controls. And those who genuinely need the drug to deal with nausea or chronic pain ought to welcome the distinction between them and those who just want a legal means and place to get high.Copyright: 2005 MediaNews Group, Inc.http://www.whittierdailynews.com/Stories/0,1413,207~12044~2885692,00.html
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