Cannabis News NORML - Working to Reform Marijuana Laws
  Iditarod Launches Drug Testing of Mushers
Posted by CN Staff on March 09, 2010 at 17:34:08 PT
By The Associated Press  
Source: Associated Press 

medical Anchorage, Alaska -- Every competitor now running the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race will be tested for alcohol and illegal drugs on the trail for the first time in the history of the 1,100-mile race -- a change defending champion Lance Mackey believes is directed at him. "I know for a fact," said the three-time winner.

Mackey, who has been open about using medical marijuana on the trail, on Tuesday was among the early front-runners in the race, which began with 71 teams Sunday in Willow.

Canada's Sebastian Schnuelle was in the lead. He was followed by 2004 winner Mitch Seavey of Seward, then four-time champion Jeff King of Denali Park. Mackey was running 7th.

Race organizers aren't saying when or where on the route the testing will occur, but they add that they aren't excluding anyone driving the 16-dog teams in the race. A musher who tests positive could face disqualification, a period of ineligibility from future races or both.

"We're going to test everybody," said Stan Hooley, executive director of the Iditarod Trail Committee. "It's not going to be random."

Race rules have included a policy on drugs and alcohol since 1984, but it has never been implemented, although the sled dogs have been tested for performance enhancers since 1994. Race organizers say they decided to formalize the policy for testing mushers beginning this year at the request of the Iditarod Official Finishers Club. The service is being provided by a drug testing company that's among the Iditarod sponsors.

Officials say the idea has been discussed for years. However, Hooley said it would be difficult to deny Mackey's contentions that he is being singled out for his acknowledged pot use and that other mushers have complained about it.

"The reality of it is he's won the race three times and people would like to figure out a way to beat him," Hooley said.

Mackey, a throat cancer survivor who is seeking his fourth consecutive win, said other competitors have stated that his use of pot gives him an edge in the trek to Nome, which he adamantly denies. The 39-year-old Fairbanks resident is facing a misdemeanor count of marijuana possession after being found with a small amount at the Anchorage airport in January, after his medical marijuana card had expired.

The cancer, diagnosed in 2001, left him with lingering physical ailments, such as pain, bone deterioration and loss of his saliva glands. Marijuana helps him cope with his health problems, and it's absurd that anyone would think that's why he's been winning, he said.

"Some people think that's an advantage?" he said. "I don't wish cancer on anybody."

Still, Mackey said he's abiding by the new rule. He even will abstain from his prescription of government-approved Marinol, which contains the active ingredient in marijuana. Race officials say exemptions include the drug, but Mackey said he's not taking any chances.

The 1,000-mile Yukon Quest International Sled Dog Race, which Mackey has won four times in a row, has no rules that specifically address drug use among mushers.

Most mushers interviewed said they have no problem with the Iditarod policy.

"I think it's about time," said Iditarod veteran Paul Gebhardt, who has twice placed second in the race. "The Iditarod is the Super Bowl of dog mushing and as far as I know it's the only major sport that didn't have drug testing for the athletes in it. They had drug testing for 16 of the athletes on the team, but not for the human one."

Canadian Hans Gatt, who won his fourth Quest in February and is running his 12th Iditarod, said the policy doesn't matter to him because he never uses drugs. But he supports it because he considers the Iditarod a professional sports event.

"I think it's a good thing," he said. "It keeps us clean."

Mackey conceded the Iditarod organizers are doing what they believe is necessary. But he does not consider himself a paid professional, because unlike other professional sports organizations, the Iditarod Trail Committee does not pay him a salary. If it did, he could understand being under its control in the Iditarod.

"It's an event that we run nine days of the year," he said. "So what I do on the other 350-something days of the year is up to me, not them."

Source: Associated Press (Wire)
Published: March 9, 2010
Copyright: 2010 The Associated Press

CannabisNews Medical Marijuana Archives
http://cannabisnews.com/news/list/medical.shtml


Home    Comment    Email    Register    Recent Comments    Help    Share on Facebook Share on stumbleupon digg it Share on reddit Share on del.icio.us

 
Comment #58 posted by FoM on March 16, 2010 at 18:54:28 PT
Mackey Wins Fourth Straight Iditarod Dog Sled Race
March 16, 2010

Excerpt: For Mackey, this year's championship also provided some personal vindication. A throat-cancer survivor who has a prescription for medical marijuana, Mackey believes he was the target of a new Iditarod rule requiring mushers to submit to drug testing.

Mackey admits he regularly smoked marijuana on the Iditarod trail in past years, a practice he said helped with pain management and appetite enhancement. His cancer treatments left him without saliva glands or taste buds.

He declared he would not use marijuana during this race, even though he had a prescription to do so.

URL: http://www.nytimes.com/reuters/2010/03/16/sports/sports-us-alaska-iditarod.html

[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #57 posted by FoM on March 16, 2010 at 15:42:10 PT
Hope
I really am happy. When the race started he was back near 17th position if I remember right. I cannot imagine 100 degrees below zero wind chill and going over 1000 miles in such a short time. I wish I could one time experience what it would be like to be pulled by around 16 dogs in a sled.

[ Post Comment ]
 
Comment #56 posted by Hope on March 16, 2010 at 15:26:00 PT
Lance Mackey
Lol! Wonderful!

Way to go, Mr. Mackey!

Whoo Hoo!

[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #55 posted by FoM on March 16, 2010 at 09:33:36 PT
Lance Mackey Won!
This makes me very happy!

Lance Mackey Wins Forth Straight Iditarod

March 16, 2010

URL: http://alaskareport.com/news109/x71368_mackey_wins_forth_iditarod.htm

[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #54 posted by FoM on March 15, 2010 at 15:25:03 PT
Lance Mackey Leads Iditarod
Defending Champion Lance Mackey Leads Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race

March 15, 2010

URL: http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/outposts/2010/03/iditarod-trail-sled-dog-race-2.html

[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #53 posted by Had Enough on March 14, 2010 at 11:14:22 PT
Letter - Canis420

Cool...

I thought the same thing about the South American thing too...but the others are closely relevant.

I wanted to suggest you cc Charlie Crist...but I can see we are on the same page with that...cool...very cool...

I do hope you corrected any errors that I had left in the final draft...I’m sure you did though...

Now we will wait...I too am anxious to see the reply...I just hope its not the same ole same ole...but...???

Again...Thank you for your efforts...every little bit will help...

Peace...is that too much to ask for???

************

People United for Medical Marijuana - Florida

http://www.pufmm.org/

***

People United for Medical Marijuana - Florida

http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=127343055695

***

People United For Medical Marijuana - Tampa (USF/UT/Tampa Bay)

http://ms-my.facebook.com/group.php?gid=86263516136

***

PUFMM - Tampa

http://www.meetup.com/PUFMM-Tampa/

[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #52 posted by Canis420 on March 13, 2010 at 14:13:28 PT:

Had Enough
I used some of your suggestions but not all. I especially like the reference to cannabis prohibition deaths. I did not use the flight in South America as I thought that was related to the drug war in general and not just Cannabis. The letter has been sent and I cc'd the Governor. lets see what they have to say now!

[ Post Comment ]
 
Comment #51 posted by Had Enough on March 12, 2010 at 16:45:07 PT
re: Canis420 #50
”Thanks...I will take your changes under advisement”

Please do...

There are still a few spelling and spacing errors in the final draft.

Be sure t correct them if you use any of it.

Thanks for the opportunity to be of some help...

[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #50 posted by Canis420 on March 12, 2010 at 16:14:07 PT:

Had Enough
Thanks...I will take your changes under advisement

[ Post Comment ]
 
Comment #49 posted by Had Enough on March 12, 2010 at 14:39:22 PT
Final Draft for Canis420
Final Draft

Peggy Lawson Executive Assistant to the Director Office of Drug Control Executive Office of the Governor 2105 The Capitol Tallahassee, Florida 32399-0001

RE: Decriminalizing Cannabis To A Civil Infraction For Adults

It does not seem to that the letter was even read as there was little response to any of the points made and it never mentioned a taxed and regulated market. the letter revolved around harm reduction. I will, however, respond point by point to the assertions you made in your response.

“It is important to understand that our federal and state drug control policies have one overarching goal: to reduce and, if possible, eliminate the use of illicit drugs like marijuana.”

It is understood that the government has been waging the drug war since the 70’s. The Government has thrown trillions of dollars at this issue over the years with little result, using American Taxpayers money! Illicit substances are easily available. For children, they are easier to obtain than our legal substances alcohol and tobacco, why is this? How is that goal working out for public safety?

“Establishing a taxed and regulated legal market for adult marijuana users would not advance the goal of our drug policies.”

Nowhere it mentioned anything about a taxed and regulated market. But I will address your assertions related to a taxed and regulated market, as the door to the subject has been opened.

“First, legal access to marijuana would likely result in steep usage rate increases.”

How are these beliefs and assertions propagated? In 2001 Portugal decriminalized all drugs. A 2009 study published by the CATO Institute found “Despite fear that the law would make Portugal a magnet for drug tourism (and increase use), the Cato study found that youth drug use declined in the five years after decriminalization took effect, treatment referrals doubled, and the rate of HIV caused by sharing needles declined. Portugal now has the lowest rate of lifetime drug use among people over age 15 -- 10 percent -- in the European Union, compared to 39.8 percent among U.S. residents ages 12 and over. "Judging by every metric, decriminalization in Portugal has been a resounding success," said Cato researcher Glenn Greenwald. "It has enabled the Portuguese government to manage and control the drug problem far better than virtually every other Western country does.

“A legal marijuana industry would employ promotion, advertising, and lobbying to increase demand while maintaining prices well below their current black market levels.”

The key word here is EMPLOY. Cannabis does not really need advertising or promotion; however, promotion and advertising could be restricted like tobacco advertising is restricted. I think many people would grow their own when re-legalized. The ones who are unable to grow there own would be purchasing from regulated legal markets that would involve the legal employment of many, spin off employment such as farming goods suppliers, shops that pay rent to the landlords, spin-off employment of many types, and legal tax money collected along with it.

“I am very concerned about the health and wellbeing of Florida citizens. The deaths caused each year by alcohol and tobacco represent a major cost to society that is in no way offset by the tax revenue generated by the sales of these substances.”

How many deaths recorded are strictly related to Cannabis use each year? That would be zero, zilch, nada. Cannabis is one of the safest substances known to mankind. Now ask the question, how many tragic deaths similar to 23 yr old Rachel Hoffman killed while being used as a confidential informant by the Tallahassee Police, 35 yr old Veronica Bowers and her 7 month old child, Charity shot down out of the sky while flying to a religious missionary, 88 yr old Kathryn Johnson who was killed when the police served a raid on the wrong address, and the approximately 10,000 drug war deaths at our Mexican Border since 2007, and the many others are caused each year by Cannabis prohibition? The answer to this question is at the crux of the dilemma surrounding current laws. Click this link to see more victims of the direct damage done to citizens solely due to cannabis prohibition. http://www.drugwarrant.com/articles/drug-war-victim/

“Furthermore, I do not believe that the adverse consequences of marijuana use (respiratory diseases, traffic fatalities, poor school performance, dependence, etc.) could ever offset the potential tax revenue it might generate.”

1) Respiratory disease; a UCLA study Published by Dr. Donald Tashkin found no link between lung cancer and Cannabis use and a small preventative effect. The study also showed no link between Cannabis use and COPD. Furthermore, Cannabis does not have to be smoked to be used. It can safely be ingested or vaporized. What respiratory diseases are you referring to?

2) Traffic Fatalities; nowhere in the letter it is suggested people should be able to drive while using Cannabis, In the Governors speech he said people should be accountable for their actions. The crime would not to be merely using Cannabis, but driving while intoxicated (the action). Millions of Americans use Cannabis responsibly and the data suggest that impaired Cannabis users are not a big problem in this country. According to the US Department of Transportation, 2003. op. cit., “The extensive studies by Robbe and O’Hanlon (1993), revealed that under the influence of marijuana, drivers are aware of their impairment, and when the experimental task allows it, they tend to actually decrease speed, avoid passing other cars, and reduce other risk-taking behaviors.”

United Kingdom Department of Environment, Transport and the Regions, Road Safety Division Cannabis and Driving: A Review of the Literature and Commentary. “Overall, we conclude that the weight of the evidence indicates that … there is no evidence that consumption of cannabis alone increases the risk of culpability for traffic crash fatalities or injuries for which hospitalization occurs, and may reduce those risks.”

3) Which study shows Cannabis use leads to poor school performance in adults? Again, no one is advocating Cannabis use for children.

4) Dependence; Study after study has shown that Cannabis use does not lead to physical addiction like our legal products alcohol and tobacco. Some psychological addiction has been documented which turns out to be as powerful as the P. addiction to chocolate.

“Any policy change that results in an increase in marijuana use, particularly among youth, is unacceptable. Cannabis use has acute effects on attention and memory;”

It is nowhere suggested or promoted that youths should use it. We are talking about responsible use by adults. And, studies have shown that in countries which have relaxed their laws on Cannabis, there is no increase in use. And again, Cannabis is more available to our youth BECAUSE it is unregulated. What is unacceptable is the draconian ways and means law enforcement in Florida seems to revel in persecuting people for their choice to use a substance safer that other legal substances.

“Cannabis use has acute effects on attention and memory, something that constitutes a particular problem for adolescents still in school and perhaps contemplating a collegiate future.”

I have never heard anybody advocating Cannabis use for adolescents, this is pure fear mongering. A regulated market would limit availability to adolescents much the same way as our regulatory controls on alcohol and tobacco. Again, we are talking about responsible use by adults

“Furthermore, marijuana use impairs judgment and motor skills, posing a serious risk of automobile accidents.”

You are repeating yourself here. See response to # 2 above.

“By enforcing policies that suppress the use of addictive drugs like marijuana, we are affirming our ultimate respect for freedom and liberty by ensuring that fewer Americans get trapped into a life of addiction.”

The current policies do not suppress the use of illicit substances. Anyone who wants to use them can do so easily. The problem comes with the black market and all of its inherent dangers. So it seems what the current policies are advocating is, its ok to cage and sometimes even kill us to protect us? Think about that one for a minute.

Finally, please be aware that federal and Florida laws prohibit “medical marijuana” because an expert review of the evidence conducted by the Institute of Medicine concluded that “Smoked marijuana…is a crude THC delivery system that also delivers harmful substances…[and] cannot be expected to provide a precisely defined drug effect. For those reasons there is little future in smoked marijuana as a medically approved medication.”

Federal and Florida laws are just wrong. First, Cannabis does not have to be smoked. It can be safely ingested or vaporized. Second, The American Medical Association, the most prestigious medical association in the country, has recently called for a re-scheduling of Cannabis on the federal level as it recognizes the medical potential of this plant.

Safer and scientifically proven drugs exist for all of the medical conditions that marijuana is erroneously thought to treat.

All medications promulgated by big pharma and the FDA are toxic to some extent, to include over the counter medications. Why would .current policy force someone to use toxic compounds when a non-toxic one is available? A recent Gallup Poll Found that 81% of US citizens favored medical Cannabis use.

The letter to you was about harm reduction, not full blown legalization but I felt the need to respond to you assertions regarding a legal cannabis market.

What the letter said is to reduce the harms associated with prohibition by not ruining people’s lives over a little bit of Cannabis in their possession. Nobody deserves to be put in a cage and forfeit assets to LEO's for possession of small amounts of this plant material. Other states have done this with no rise in use or rise in other calamity. These actions not only breed contempt for the law enforcement community, it also ruins lives and family cohesion.

Decades of arresting and prosecuting millions of Cannabis users has failed to prevent teenagers or anyone else from using it. A study published in the American Journal of Public Health found "no evidence to support claims that criminalization reduces use." Cannabis is easier for children to get their hands on than alcohol. Why is this you ask? Alcohol is regulated. Prohibition is the absence of regulation and it is making criminals rich. You called Cannabis an illicit drug. It is only "illicit" because of the laws regarding its use that were based on outright lies. It is a personal freedom issue whether an adult chooses to use Cannabis which is safer than other legal substances. It is time Florida got some common sense regarding this plant. You did not respond directly to any of the points I made in my letter. The letter you sent me had nothing to do with my request and seemed more like standard government propaganda. This type of head in the sand, knee jerk response to a legitimate policy concern will not be tolerated by the general population much longer.

Included is a link to a very common sense bill making its way through the RI legislature as we speak. Suddenly the light bulb is coming on all over the country. Florida politicians need to get on board or they will be left behind. I anxiously your response to my previous letter, as there wasn’t any address of the points made, and this one, if you disagree with anything I said. Please include SCIENCE BASED answers in your response.

http://www.rilin.state.ri.us/BillText/BillText10/HouseText10/H7838.htm

Sincerely

Citizen and Professional



[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #48 posted by Had Enough on March 12, 2010 at 14:39:09 PT
Letter for Canis420
The thing that stand s out to me is use of “I”, “you” & “my”...It seems to me if it was re-worded a little bit...It would get a little bit more credence. Those words can be used... but... it might be used a little too much..

1st paragraph

It does not seem to me[delete the word...me]that you even read my letter[replace with... that the letter was even read as you did not respond [replace with...as there was little response] to any of the points I [delete the word...I]... made and I [replace with...it] never mentioned a taxed and regulated market. My [replace with...the] letter revolved around harm reduction. I will, however, respond point by point to the assertions you made to me[delete the words...to me] in your response.

With the modifications it would look like this...

It does not seem to that the letter was even read as there was little response to any of the points made and it never mentioned a taxed and regulated market. the letter revolved around harm reduction. I will, however, respond point by point to the assertions you made in your response.

2nd paragraph

I understand[replace with...It is understood] that the government has been waging the drug war since the 70’s. The Government has thrown trillions of dollars at this issue over the years with no [replace with...little] result, some of that was my money! [replace with...American Taxpayers money!]Illicit substances are easily available. For children, they are easier to obtain than our legal substances alcohol and tobacco, why is this? So [delete the word...so] how is that goal working out for you? [delete the words...for you...insert the words...for public safety?]

With the modifications it would look like this...

It is understood that the government has been waging the drug war since the 70’s. The Government has thrown trillions of dollars at this issue over the years with little result, using American Taxpayers money! Illicit substances are easily available. For children, they are easier to obtain than our legal substances alcohol and tobacco, why is this? How is that goal working out for public safety?

3rd point

Nowhere did I say [replace with...it mentioned] anything about a taxed and regulated market. But I will address your assertions related to a taxed and regulated market as you opened the door.[replace with...as the door to the subject has been opened]

With the modifications it would look like this...

Nowhere it mentioned anything about a taxed and regulated market. But I will address your assertions related to a taxed and regulated market, as the door to the subject has been opened.

4th point...

How do you come by this assertion? [replace with the words... How are these beliefs and assertions propagated?] In 2001 Portugal decriminalized all drugs. A 2009 study published by the CATO Institute found “Despite fear that the law would make Portugal a magnet for drug tourism (and increase use), the Cato study found that youth drug use declined in the five years after decriminalization took effect, treatment referrals doubled, and the rate of HIV caused by sharing needles declined. Portugal now has the lowest rate of lifetime drug use among people over age 15 -- 10 percent -- in the European Union, compared to 39.8 percent among U.S. residents ages 12 and over. "Judging by every metric, decriminalization in Portugal has been a resounding success," said Cato researcher Glenn Greenwald. "It has enabled the Portuguese government to manage and control the drug problem far better than virtually every other Western country does."

With the modifications it would look like this...

How are these beliefs and assertions propagated? In 2001 Portugal decriminalized all drugs. A 2009 study published by the CATO Institute found “Despite fear that the law would make Portugal a magnet for drug tourism (and increase use), the Cato study found that youth drug use declined in the five years after decriminalization took effect, treatment referrals doubled, and the rate of HIV caused by sharing needles declined. Portugal now has the lowest rate of lifetime drug use among people over age 15 -- 10 percent -- in the European Union, compared to 39.8 percent among U.S. residents ages 12 and over. "Judging by every metric, decriminalization in Portugal has been a resounding success," said Cato researcher Glenn Greenwald. "It has enabled the Portuguese government to manage and control the drug problem far better than virtually every other Western country does.

5th point...

The key word here is EMPLOY. Cannabis does not really need advertising or promotion, however, promotion and advertising could be restricted like tobacco advertising is restricted. I think most[replace most with the word...many] people would grow their own if [replace with the word...when] re-legalized. [insert the words... The ones who are unable to grow there own would be purchasing from regulated legal markets that would involve the legal employment of many, spin off employment such as farming goods suppliers, shops that pay rent to the landlords, spin-off employment of many types, and legal tax money collected along with it.]

With the modifications it would look like this...

The key word here is EMPLOY. Cannabis does not really need advertising or promotion; however, promotion and advertising could be restricted like tobacco advertising is restricted. I think many people would grow their own, if re-legalized. The ones who are unable to grow there own would be purchasing from regulated legal markets that would involve the legal employment of many, spin off employment such as farming goods suppliers, shops that pay rent to the landlords, spin-off employment of many types, and legal tax money collected along with it.

6th point...

How many deaths [insert the word...recorded] are strictly related to Cannabis use each year? That would be zero, zilch, nada. Cannabis is one of the safest substances known to mankind. Now ask the question, how many [insert the word...tragic] deaths [insert... 23 yr old Rachel Hoffman killed while being used as a confidential informant by the Tallahassee Police, 35 yr old Veronica Bowers and her 7 month old child, Charity shot down out of the sky while flying to a religious missionary, 88 yr old Kathryn Johnson who was killed when the police served a raid on the wrong address, and the approximately 10,000 drug war deaths at our Mexican Border since 2007, and the many others]are caused each year by Cannabis prohibition? The answer to this question is at the crux of the dilemma surrounding current laws.

[insert...Click this link to see more victims of the direct damage done to citizens solely due to cannabis prohibition. http://www.drugwarrant.com/articles/drug-war-victim/

With the modifications it would look like this...

How many deaths recorded are strictly related to Cannabis use each year? That would be zero, zilch, nada. Cannabis is one of the safest substances known to mankind. Now ask the question, how many tragic deaths similar to 23 yr old Rachel Hoffman killed while being used as a confidential informant by the Tallahassee Police, 35 yr old Veronica Bowers and her 7 month old child, Charity shot down out of the sky while flying to a religious missionary, 88 yr old Kathryn Johnson who was killed when the police served a raid warrant on the wrong address, and the approximately 10,000 drug war deaths at our Mexican Border since 2007, and the many others caused each year by Cannabis prohibition? The answer to this question is at the crux of the dilemma surrounding current laws.

Click this link to see more victims of the direct damage done to citizens solely due to cannabis prohibition. http://www.drugwarrant.com/articles/drug-war-victim/

7th point...

sub paragraph 2)...

2) Traffic Fatalities; no where did I say [replace with the words...in the letter it is suggested] people should be able to drive while using Cannabis, but [delete the word...but] in the Governors speech he said people should be accountable for their actions. The crime would not to be merely using Cannabis, but driving while intoxicated (the action). Millions of Americans use Cannabis responsibly and the data suggest that impaired Cannabis users are not a big problem in this country. According to the US Department of Transportation, 2003. op. cit., “The extensive studies by Robbe and O’Hanlon (1993), revealed that under the influence of marijuana, drivers are aware of their impairment, and when the experimental task allows it, they tend to actually decrease speed, avoid passing other cars, and reduce other risk-taking behaviors.”

With the modifications it would look like this...

2) Traffic Fatalities; nowhere in the letter it is suggested people should be able to drive while using Cannabis, In the Governors speech he said people should be accountable for their actions. The crime would not to be merely using Cannabis, but driving while intoxicated (the action). Millions of Americans use Cannabis responsibly and the data suggest that impaired Cannabis users are not a big problem in this country. According to the US Department of Transportation, 2003. op. cit., “The extensive studies by Robbe and O’Hanlon (1993), revealed that under the influence of marijuana, drivers are aware of their impairment, and when the experimental task allows it, they tend to actually decrease speed, avoid passing other cars, and reduce other risk-taking behaviors.”

8th point...

No where did I suggest [replace with the words...It was nowhere suggested or promoted that youths] should use it. [insert...We are talking about responsible use by adults] .And, studies have shown that in countries which have relaxed their laws on Cannabis, there is no increase in use. And again, Cannabis is more available to our youth BECAUSE it is unregulated. What is unacceptable is the thuggish way [replace with the words...draconian ways and means] law enforcement in Florida seems to revel in persecuting people for their choice to use a substance safer that other legal substances.

With the modifications it would look like this...

It is nowhere suggested or promoted that youths should use it. We are talking about responsible use by adults. And, studies have shown that in countries which have relaxed their laws on Cannabis, there is no increase in use. And again, Cannabis is more available to our youth BECAUSE it is unregulated. What is unacceptable is the draconian ways and means law enforcement in Florida seems to revel in persecuting people for their choice to use a substance safer that other legal substances.

9th point...

I have never heard anybody advocating Cannabis use for adolescents, this is pure fear mongering. Again, [delete the word ...Again] a regulated market would limit availability to adolescents much the same way as our regulatory controls on alcohol and tobacco. With the modifications it would look like this...

I have never heard anybody advocating Cannabis use for adolescents, this is pure fear mongering. A regulated market would limit availability to adolescents much the same way as our regulatory controls on alcohol and tobacco. Again, we are talking about responsible use by adults 11th point... The current policies do not suppress the use of illicit substances. Anyone who wants to use them can do so easily. The problem comes with the black market and all of its inherent dangers. So what you are saying [replace with the words... So it seems what the current policies are advocating is, its ok to cage and sometimes even kill us to protect us?] Think about that one for a minute.

With the modifications it would look like this...

The current policies do not suppress the use of illicit substances. Anyone who wants to use them can do so easily. The problem comes with the black market and all of its inherent dangers. So it seems what the current policies are advocating is, its ok to cage and sometimes even kill us to protect us? Think about that one for a minute.

Further on down to this paragraph...

All medications promulgated by big pharma and the FDA are toxic to some extent, to include over the counter medications. Why would you [replace with the words...current policy] force someone to use toxic compounds when a non-toxic one is available? A recent Gallup Poll Found that 81% of US citizens favored medical Cannabis use.

With the modifications it would look like this...

All medications promulgated by big pharma and the FDA are toxic to some extent, to include over the counter medications. Why would .current policy force someone to use toxic compounds when a non-toxic one is available? A recent Gallup Poll Found that 81% of US citizens favored medical Cannabis use.

My [replace with the word..The] letter to you was about harm reduction, not full blown legalization but I felt I had [replace with the words...the need] to respond to you assertions regarding a legal cannabis market.

With the modifications it would look like this...

The letter to you was about harm reduction, not full blown legalization but I felt the need to respond to you assertions regarding a legal cannabis market.

What I did say in my letter [replace with the words... What the letter said] is to reduce the harms associated with prohibition by not ruining people’s lives over a little bit of Cannabis in their possession. Nobody deserves to be put in a cage and forfeit assets to LEO's for possession of small amounts of this plant material. Other states have done this with no rise in use or rise in other calamity. These actions not only breed contempt for the law enforcement community, it also ruins lives and family cohesion.

With the modifications it would look like this...

What the letter said is to reduce the harms associated with prohibition by not ruining people’s lives over a little bit of Cannabis in their possession. Nobody deserves to be put in a cage and forfeit assets to LEO's for possession of small amounts of this plant material. Other states have done this with no rise in use or rise in other calamity. These actions not only breed contempt for the law enforcement community, it also ruins lives and family cohesion.

and...

If you are interested, I have included [relace with ...Included is] a link to a very common sense bill making its way through the RI legislature as we speak. Suddenly the light bulb is coming on all over the country. Florida politicians need to get on board or they will be left behind. I hope you respond [replace with... I anxiously your response] to my previous letter, as you did not address any of the points [as there wasn’t any address of the points made] I [delete the word...I] made, and this one if you disagree with anything I said. Please include SCIENCE BASED answers in your response.

With the modifications it would look like this...

Included is a link to a very common sense bill making its way through the RI legislature as we speak. Suddenly the light bulb is coming on all over the country. Florida politicians need to get on board or they will be left behind. I anxiously your response to my previous letter, as there wasn’t any address of the points made, and this one, if you disagree with anything I said. Please include SCIENCE BASED answers in your response.

[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #47 posted by Had Enough on March 12, 2010 at 11:37:44 PT
letter error
Working on letter...got this error message...

ERROR!! Post Exceeds 16000 Bytes...please reduce message size and repost.

***

Will return later to finish and to split it into two parts...stand by



[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #46 posted by Had Enough on March 12, 2010 at 07:55:44 PT
Re: Canis420

I’m working on polishing up the letter...stand by...

And thank you again...

good letter...and we will make it better...:)

[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #45 posted by FoM on March 12, 2010 at 07:49:00 PT
ekim
Thanks for the heads up!

[ Post Comment ]
 
Comment #44 posted by ekim on March 12, 2010 at 05:57:57 PT
watch Democracy Now dir tv 375 -7pm
will have part 2 of interview -- a wonderful book on how the drug war makes a entire cast system out of those that have been convicted of non-violent drug crimes.

The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness by Michelle Alexander

[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #43 posted by runruff on March 12, 2010 at 04:16:03 PT
comment #34
Great idea for a radio drama.

Tonight at about 9pm Takilma radio I am reading segment number 4 of "Tattoo Zoo".

http://www.takilmafm.com/

[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #42 posted by Dankhank on March 11, 2010 at 23:59:24 PT
books
here in our town, school district, some kids get two sets of books, one set to take home, so no humping large book bags, some schools don't do that and I am uninterested enough not to call and ask why. Mayhap I will call.

[ Post Comment ]
 
Comment #41 posted by Paint with light on March 11, 2010 at 22:18:47 PT
runruff comment #34
I would like to see a video re-enactment of the original spring 1937 testimony.

An audio version would be nice also.

Anslinger's life might even make for a full length film.

I am sure the guy had enough demons to make it interesting.

I can picture the audience booing and hissing every time he enters a scene.

Get out the video camera runruff.

It is time to go viral on You Tube.

Legal like alcohol.

[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #40 posted by Hope on March 11, 2010 at 21:21:37 PT
Comment #25 posted by Sam Adams
"Soon our children will shuffle off to school with their 50-pound backpack to be urine tested every morning. what a sick and warped culture, we're becoming some sort of weird mixture of Nazi Germany and the Roman Empire."

That made me so sad to read that. It reminded me that I've all too often seen relatively frail little boys and girls burdened down for school with ungodly heavy backpacks and sad determination to carry that burden where they had to.

That's not right.

I think it's all, the heavy book burdens, the intolerance, the policing and prison like treatment of students in some schools, the drug testing... all heavy burdens... been created by some huge industries for their personal profit. Burdens placed on others, even children, to create profit for some greedy industries and businesses.

It's so wrong and so many children and young people will break, and have broken down, under the unnecessarily heavy burdens before they are even old enough to deal with some of life's necessary burdens.

Preparing them for the real world? I don't think so. I think it's worse. Maybe more like feeding them to the "Real" world, the monster, the god of mammon, as we have allowed it to become right now. We need to make a better "Real" world... for them and ourselves.



[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #39 posted by Hope on March 11, 2010 at 20:16:35 PT
Comment #27 posted by boballen131313
So true!

[ Post Comment ]
 
Comment #38 posted by Hope on March 11, 2010 at 20:14:21 PT
Dr. Russo
He's a genius, no doubt, and a very, very nice man. I miss being able to talk to him as much as we could at one time.

[ Post Comment ]
 
Comment #37 posted by FoM on March 11, 2010 at 15:39:48 PT
Dankhank
I think very highly of Dr. Russo. He's a good man.

[ Post Comment ]
 
Comment #36 posted by Dankhank on March 11, 2010 at 14:52:28 PT
Dr Russo
I met the good Doctor while he still worked in Missoula, MT. the daughter of my oldest son lives there. On a visit one time, I looked up his address and phone no., called and made an appointment to visit, taking him a copy of the Cannabis Research Library, having a great talk and receiving, from him a couple of books, one he wrote, about Cannabis and AIDS, and a medical journal he had been published in.

a very personable man. I enjoyed the visit, immensely.

Dr. Russo has a paper, "Acute Cannabinoid Deficiency."

[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #35 posted by Canis420 on March 11, 2010 at 14:06:35 PT:

Thanks
Everyone...runruff, I dont think I want to go into the history in my letter unless they refute my lie statement

[ Post Comment ]
 
Comment #34 posted by runruff on March 11, 2010 at 07:04:16 PT
Is this recorded history any help, Canis420?
This is but one issue I am hoping Obama will clear up for the American people. I am tired of the DEAth running roughshod over sick people just for their own job security and to maintain their fat budgets, not to mention their real purpose which is to protect the profits of Big-pharms. Next to the oil industry they are the most profitable and the second most influential industry in US Government. The DEAth squads are doing their jobs well. Compare the DEA to Nazi SS and Gestapo. Same premise differnt issue.

Who pays the piper calls the tune!

This is how our whores in congress first outlawed cannabis as medicine:Did Anyone Consult the AMA?" http://www.jackherer.com/chapter04.html

However, even within his controlled Committee hearings, many expert witnesses spoke out against the passage of these unusual tax laws.

Dr. William C. Woodward, for instance, who was both a physician and an attorney for the American Medical Association, testified on behalf of the AMA.

He said, in effect, the entire fabric of federal testimony was tabloid sensationalism! No real testimony had been heard! This law, passed in ignorance, could possibly deny the world a potential medicine, especially now that the medical world was just beginning to find which ingredients in cannabis were active.

Woodward told the committee that the only reason the AMA hadn"t come out against the marijuana tax law sooner was that marijuana had been described in the press for 20 years as "killer weed from Mexico."

The AMA doctors had just realized "two days before" these spring 1937 hearings, that the plant Congress intended to outlaw was known medically as cannabis, the benign substance used in America with perfect safety in scores of illnesses for over one hundred years.

"We cannot understand yet, Mr. Chairman," Woodward protested, "why this bill should have been prepared in secret for two years without any intimation, even to the profession, that it was being prepared." He and the AMA* were quickly denounced by Anslinger and the entire congressional committee, and curtly excused.3

* The AMA and the Roosevelt Administration were strong antagonists in 1937.

When the Marijuana Tax Act bill came up for oral report, discussion, and vote on the floor of Congress, only one pertinent question was asked from the floor: "Did anyone consult with the AMA and get their opinion?" Representative Vinson, answering for the Ways and Means Committee replied, "Yes, we have. A Dr. Wharton [mistaken pronunciation of Woodward?] and [the AMA] are in complete agreement!"

With this memorable lie, the bill passed, and became law in December, 1937.

This is but one issue I am hoping Obama will clear up for the American people. I am tired of the DEAth running roughshod over sick people just for their own job security and to maintain their fat budgets, not to mention their real purpose which is to protect the profits of Big-pharms. Next to the oil industry they are the most profitable and the second most influential industry in US Government. The DEAth squads are doing their jobs well. Compare the DEA to Nazi SS and Gestapo. Same premise differnt issue.

Who pays the piper calls the tune!

This is how our whores in congress first outlawed cannabis as medicine:Did Anyone Consult the AMA?" http://www.jackherer.com/chapter04.html

However, even within his controlled Committee hearings, many expert witnesses spoke out against the passage of these unusual tax laws.

Dr. William C. Woodward, for instance, who was both a physician and an attorney for the American Medical Association, testified on behalf of the AMA.

He said, in effect, the entire fabric of federal testimony was tabloid sensationalism! No real testimony had been heard! This law, passed in ignorance, could possibly deny the world a potential medicine, especially now that the medical world was just beginning to find which ingredients in cannabis were active.

Woodward told the committee that the only reason the AMA hadn"t come out against the marijuana tax law sooner was that marijuana had been described in the press for 20 years as "killer weed from Mexico."

The AMA doctors had just realized "two days before" these spring 1937 hearings, that the plant Congress intended to outlaw was known medically as cannabis, the benign substance used in America with perfect safety in scores of illnesses for over one hundred years.

"We cannot understand yet, Mr. Chairman," Woodward protested, "why this bill should have been prepared in secret for two years without any intimation, even to the profession, that it was being prepared." He and the AMA* were quickly denounced by Anslinger and the entire congressional committee, and curtly excused.3

* The AMA and the Roosevelt Administration were strong antagonists in 1937.

When the Marijuana Tax Act bill came up for oral report, discussion, and vote on the floor of Congress, only one pertinent question was asked from the floor: "Did anyone consult with the AMA and get their opinion?" Representative Vinson, answering for the Ways and Means Committee replied, "Yes, we have. A Dr. Wharton [mistaken pronunciation of Woodward?] and [the AMA] are in complete agreement!"

With this memorable lie, the bill passed, and became law in December, 1937.



[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #33 posted by runruff on March 11, 2010 at 06:59:14 PT
Great artical!
Calvina Fay is a natural born pot head! So is Johnny Pee!

Their only problem seems to be not enough cannabinoids in the brain. [I'll not speculate on what else could be wrong?]

[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #32 posted by ekim on March 11, 2010 at 05:35:30 PT
good going Dankhank
At least one author, medical doctor Ethan Russo, believes in the possibility of endocanabinoid deficiency,

[ Post Comment ]
 
Comment #31 posted by Hope on March 10, 2010 at 21:39:55 PT
Canis420
It's seems like a very powerful letter to me.

And thank you for including my suggestion of a question.

Others have already said it, Canis420, but I'll say it again, you're doing a good job of something that really needs to be done.

You probably won't hear back from this bunch, either, after this letter. They meant to intimidate you with their title and letterhead. I'm so glad they didn't.

If they actually do read this thoughtful letter from a concerned citizen, they might get a clue as to how much harm prohibition is causing, instead of preventing.

Probably not, though. Although it certainly won't be for lack of good information in your letter. That's for sure. But there's always a chance a little bit will sink in on someone there.... maybe Peggy, herself, if she is bold enough and brave enough to read it carefully, with a willingness to understand what you are saying, and without 'malice aforethought'.

That's a good idea to mention that Rhode Island bill.

Very good job.

Thank you, again.

[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #30 posted by FoM on March 10, 2010 at 18:02:38 PT
Dankhank
Thank you. That's good.

[ Post Comment ]
 
Comment #29 posted by Dankhank on March 10, 2010 at 17:03:28 PT
OT ... wow ...
you won't believe this story ...

yea you will, just not where it comes from ...

http://health.blogs.foxnews.com/2010/03/10/are-you-cannabis-deficient/

[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #28 posted by FoM on March 10, 2010 at 14:32:50 PT
For Those Wh Might Be Interested
Iditarod Videos -- Youtube

URL: http://drugsense.org/url/xS7ulkW7

[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #27 posted by boballen131313 on March 10, 2010 at 13:47:38 PT:

HEY JUST A MINUTE!
So what's it going to be prohibitionists? You can't have it both ways. Performance Enhancing Drug or performance stunting drug... It doesn't matter if it turns you into superman or dims your concentration, the prohibitionists are distorted enough to believe that any use is abuse even if it has saved your life!

What is evident, cannabis use hasn't dulled the wits of Lance Mackey, nor has it blunted his ability to get the job done. Mr. Mackey is an inspiration and that rips out the guts of the prohibitionist's harangue.

Australia hasn't paid much attention to the Iditarod, but thanks to the big noise about weed, interest is rising.

[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #26 posted by Paint with light on March 10, 2010 at 13:32:02 PT
Canis420
Great Letter!

You did your research well.

Good Luck.

Legal like alcohol.

[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #25 posted by Sam Adams on March 10, 2010 at 12:51:56 PT
fascinating story
so the drug testing company basically paid off the race organizers so they can propagandize the event for urine testing. Great! Way to sell us out guys!

soon our children will shuffle off to school with their 50-pound backpack to be urine tested every morning. what a sick and warped culture, we're becoming some sort of weird mixture of Nazi Germany and the Roman Empire.

As the obesity crisis continues and diabetes blooms, we'll still be directing our resources toward urine testing for cannabis.



[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #24 posted by The GCW on March 10, 2010 at 12:39:02 PT
New minimums
Cannabis may be found to help so many things that in the future there may be even more strick laws that today.

Cannabis may be so important for Our health that if You are stopped and found to have less than 4 grams of cannabis You could face mandatory minimum jail terms.

Don't leave home with out it... and You better have enough of it, or risk jail.

Imagine the cop's union attempting to raise the minimum for job security.

[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #23 posted by FoM on March 10, 2010 at 11:57:44 PT
Rainbow
It's good to see you. I am curious about why you say someone got to Obama? What has he said that I might have missed? I was sick and it's possible I didn't read what he said.

[ Post Comment ]
 
Comment #22 posted by Canis420 on March 10, 2010 at 11:53:02 PT:

Rainbow
Thank you...I have sent letters like this to Obama and everyone else I can think of...however, this is the first time anybody has responded in anyway. This is a response to their response to my letter to the Governor

[ Post Comment ]
 
Comment #21 posted by Canis420 on March 10, 2010 at 11:50:52 PT:

Had Enough
I can wait...feel free to suggest amendments

[ Post Comment ]
 
Comment #20 posted by Rainbow on March 10, 2010 at 11:40:59 PT
Canis420
Canis420 what a great letter. I had to laugh all the way to the pill box.

You should write a letter like this to Gil in Washington and copy Obama.

Someone got to Obama the minute he took office. I would really like to know what was said becasue he was so for us then against us or maybe his handlers.

I like you ability to pull in the scie3nce. We should have a science list like the medical list Storm Crow gave us.

I send Storm Crow's list all over even to the neurological reearchers here at work.

A science based list with abstracts could be sent to newspaper editors, the cancer society, LEOs all over so they know that they lie.

Thanks,

[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #19 posted by Had Enough on March 10, 2010 at 11:38:26 PT
Canis420

If you haven’t sent that off yet...I have a few modifications you might consider...

I will be away from my machine here for the rest of the day, and most of tonight.

If you can wait, I can offer these suggestions maybe tomorrow.

Also I would like to commend you on your efforts...this change won’t happen on its own...we have to MAKE it happen...

Thank You

[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #18 posted by tintala on March 10, 2010 at 11:33:32 PT:

How about making the big prize 4 ounces of HERB
Screw the corporate guidlines, bet those judges go back home and take stiff drinks as well. Should make the big prize for winning and secondary prizes copiuos amounts of good herb.

[ Post Comment ]
 
Comment #17 posted by Canis420 on March 10, 2010 at 11:14:07 PT:

Hope. You wanted to see
My response to the Florida drug warrior so here it is. My apologies to others who might not be interested as it is quite long

Peggy Lawson Executive Assistant to the Director Office of Drug Control Executive Office of the Governor 2105 The Capitol Tallahassee, Florida 32399-0001

RE: Decriminalizing Cannabis To A Civil Infraction For Adults

It does not seem to me that you even read my letter as you did not respond to any of the points I made and I never mentioned a taxed and regulated market. My letter revolved around harm reduction. I will, however, respond point by point to the assertions you made to me in your response

“It is important to understand that our federal and state drug control policies have one overarching goal: to reduce and, if possible, eliminate the use of illicit drugs like marijuana.”

I understand that the government has been waging the drug war since the 70’s. The Government has thrown trillions of dollars at this issue over the years with no result, some of that was my money! Illicit substances are easily available. For children, they are easier to obtain than our legal substances alcohol and tobacco, why is this? So how is that goal working out for you?

“Establishing a taxed and regulated legal market for adult marijuana users would not advance the goal of our drug policies.”

Nowhere did I say anything about a taxed and regulated market. But I will address your assertions related to a taxed and regulated market as you opened the door.

“First, legal access to marijuana would likely result in steep usage rate increases.”

How do you come by this assertion? In 2001 Portugal decriminalized all drugs. A 2009 study published by the CATO Institute found “Despite fear that the law would make Portugal a magnet for drug tourism (and increase use), the Cato study found that youth drug use declined in the five years after decriminalization took effect, treatment referrals doubled, and the rate of HIV caused by sharing needles declined. Portugal now has the lowest rate of lifetime drug use among people over age 15 -- 10 percent -- in the European Union, compared to 39.8 percent among U.S. residents ages 12 and over. "Judging by every metric, decriminalization in Portugal has been a resounding success," said Cato researcher Glenn Greenwald. "It has enabled the Portuguese government to manage and control the drug problem far better than virtually every other Western country does."

“A legal marijuana industry would employ promotion, advertising, and lobbying to increase demand while maintaining prices well below their current black market levels.”

The key word here is EMPLOY. Cannabis does not really need advertising or promotion, however, promotion and advertising could be restricted like tobacco advertising is restricted. I think most people would grow their own if re-legalized.

“I am very concerned about the health and wellbeing of Florida citizens. The deaths caused each year by alcohol and tobacco represent a major cost to society that is in no way offset by the tax revenue generated by the sales of these substances.”

How many deaths are strictly related to Cannabis use each year? That would be zero, zilch, nada. Cannabis is one of the safest substances known to mankind. Now ask the question, how many deaths are caused each year by Cannabis prohibition? The answer to this question is at the crux of the dilemma surrounding current laws.

“Furthermore, I do not believe that the adverse consequences of marijuana use (respiratory diseases, traffic fatalities, poor school performance, dependence, etc.) could ever offset the potential tax revenue it might generate.”

1) Respiratory disease; a UCLA study Published by Dr. Donald Tashkin found no link between lung cancer and Cannabis use and a small preventative effect. The study also showed no link between Cannabis use and COPD. Furthermore, Cannabis does not have to be smoked to be used. It can safely be ingested or vaporized. What respiratory diseases are you referring to?

2) Traffic Fatalities; no where did I say people should be able to drive while using Cannabis, but in the Governors speech he said people should be accountable for their actions. The crime would not to be merely using Cannabis, but driving while intoxicated (the action). Millions of Americans use Cannabis responsibly and the data suggest that impaired Cannabis users are not a big problem in this country. According to the US Department of Transportation, 2003. op. cit., “The extensive studies by Robbe and O’Hanlon (1993), revealed that under the influence of marijuana, drivers are aware of their impairment, and when the experimental task allows it, they tend to actually decrease speed, avoid passing other cars, and reduce other risk-taking behaviors.”

United Kingdom Department of Environment, Transport and the Regions, Road Safety Division Cannabis and Driving: A Review of the Literature and Commentary. “Overall, we conclude that the weight of the evidence indicates that … there is no evidence that consumption of cannabis alone increases the risk of culpability for traffic crash fatalities or injuries for which hospitalization occurs, and may reduce those risks.”

3) Which study shows Cannabis use leads to poor school performance in adults? Again, no one is advocating Cannabis use for children.

4) Dependence; Study after study has shown that Cannabis use does not lead to physical addiction like our legal products alcohol and tobacco. Some psychological addiction has been documented which turns out to be as powerful as the P. addiction to chocolate.

“Any policy change that results in an increase in marijuana use, particularly among youth, is unacceptable. Cannabis use has acute effects on attention and memory;”

No where did I suggest kids should use it. And, studies have shown that in countries which have relaxed their laws on Cannabis, there is no increase in use. And again, Cannabis is more available to our youth BECAUSE it is unregulated. What is unacceptable is the thuggish way law enforcement in Florida seems to revel in persecuting people for their choice to use a substance safer that other legal substances.

“Cannabis use has acute effects on attention and memory, something that constitutes a particular problem for adolescents still in school and perhaps contemplating a collegiate future.”

I have never heard anybody advocating Cannabis use for adolescents, this is pure fear mongering. Again, a regulated market would limit availability to adolescents much the same way as our regulatory controls on alcohol and tobacco.

“Furthermore, marijuana use impairs judgment and motor skills, posing a serious risk of automobile accidents.”

You are repeating yourself here. See response to # 2 above.

“By enforcing policies that suppress the use of addictive drugs like marijuana, we are affirming our ultimate respect for freedom and liberty by ensuring that fewer Americans get trapped into a life of addiction.”

The current policies do not suppress the use of illicit substances. Anyone who wants to use them can do so easily. The problem comes with the black market and all of its inherent dangers. So what you are saying is, its ok to kill us to protect us? Think about that one for a minute.

Finally, please be aware that federal and Florida laws prohibit “medical marijuana” because an expert review of the evidence conducted by the Institute of Medicine concluded that “Smoked marijuana…is a crude THC delivery system that also delivers harmful substances…[and] cannot be expected to provide a precisely defined drug effect. For those reasons there is little future in smoked marijuana as a medically approved medication.”

Federal and Florida laws are just wrong. First, Cannabis does not have to be smoked. It can be safely ingested or vaporized. Second, The American Medical Association, the most prestigious medical association in the country, has recently called for a re-scheduling of Cannabis on the federal level as it recognizes the medical potential of this plant.

Safer and scientifically proven drugs exist for all of the medical conditions that marijuana is erroneously thought to treat.

All medications promulgated by big pharma and the FDA are toxic to some extent, to include over the counter medications. Why would you force someone to use toxic compounds when a non-toxic one is available? A recent Gallup Poll Found that 81% of US citizens favored medical Cannabis use.

My letter to you was about harm reduction, not full blown legalization but I felt I had to respond to you assertions regarding a legal cannabis market.

What I did say in my letter is to reduce the harms associated with prohibition by not ruining people’s lives over a little bit of Cannabis in their possession. Nobody deserves to be put in a cage and forfeit assets to LEO's for possession of small amounts of this plant material. Other states have done this with no rise in use or rise in other calamity. These actions not only breed contempt for the law enforcement community, it also ruins lives and family cohesion.

Decades of arresting and prosecuting millions of Cannabis users has failed to prevent teenagers or anyone else from using it. A study published in the American Journal of Public Health found "no evidence to support claims that criminalization reduces use." Cannabis is easier for children to get their hands on than alcohol. Why is this you ask? Alcohol is regulated. Prohibition is the absence of regulation and it is making criminals rich. You called Cannabis an illicit drug. It is only "illicit" because of the laws regarding its use that were based on outright lies. It is a personal freedom issue whether an adult chooses to use Cannabis which is safer than other legal substances. It is time Florida got some common sense regarding this plant. You did not respond directly to any of the points I made in my letter. The letter you sent me had nothing to do with my request and seemed more like standard government propaganda. This type of head in the sand, knee jerk response to a legitimate policy concern will not be tolerated by the general population much longer.

If you are interested, I have included a link to a very common sense bill making its way through the RI legislature as we speak. Suddenly the light bulb is coming on all over the country. Florida politicians need to get on board or they will be left behind. I hope you respond to my previous letter, as you did not address any of the points I made, and this one if you disagree with anything I said. Please include SCIENCE BASED answers in your response.

http://www.rilin.state.ri.us/BillText/BillText10/HouseText10/H7838.htm

Sincerely

Citizen and Professional

[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #16 posted by Yoshi on March 10, 2010 at 11:06:44 PT:

Good one Runruff
Can we kill off our inner off world miner? It's hard to be too optimistic, but I try to keep the faith. If you're interested in a straight forward visionary plant experience, I highly recommend the Peyote Way Church in Arizona to anyone who feels the need.

[ Post Comment ]
 
Comment #15 posted by runruff on March 10, 2010 at 02:48:18 PT
If DSL...
...is LSD backward, then AVATAR must be ayawaska sideways!

[ Post Comment ]
 
Comment #14 posted by Hope on March 09, 2010 at 21:07:02 PT
Big business
has stolen so much dignity from us all. And they keep on doing it.



[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #13 posted by Hope on March 09, 2010 at 21:06:41 PT
Big business
has stolen so much dignity from us all. And they keep on doing it.



[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #12 posted by MikeEEEEE on March 09, 2010 at 20:51:27 PT
fair-play
Let the guys who make these rules piss in a test tube!

[ Post Comment ]
 
Comment #11 posted by FoM on March 09, 2010 at 19:55:37 PT
Hope
That would be good.

[ Post Comment ]
 
Comment #10 posted by Hope on March 09, 2010 at 19:44:36 PT
I think it might be better to start another
Iditarod Commemorative Race.

Forget the big money. Forget the corporate sponsors.

Run it for the prize money from entry fees, for the commemoration of valiant job well done, and for the sport of it.

[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #9 posted by FoM on March 09, 2010 at 19:39:13 PT
Hope
I do hope he wins. The Iditarod has to be one of the most difficult sports there is. It's not just the bitter cold but you must make sure your dogs are healthy, rested and fed and treated if something happens to one of them. Tremendous mind work must go into this competition.

[ Post Comment ]
 
Comment #8 posted by Hope on March 09, 2010 at 19:38:46 PT
Ah. I see.
"The service is being provided by a drug testing company that's among the Iditarod sponsors."

[ Post Comment ]
 
Comment #7 posted by FoM on March 09, 2010 at 19:33:53 PT
josephlacerenza
That's true.

It's so cold up north and all those miles they must travel. I think it might make someone dream of just being able to sit on Pete's Couch instead. I'm just kidding.

[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #6 posted by Hope on March 09, 2010 at 19:30:28 PT
He'll have to medicate with their choice
of medicines.

He probably has a strong liver and can endure the damage and injustice for the testing time...maybe prove something. Then he can go back to the medicine that is best for him.

Surely all medicines aren't disallowed. Surely he will be able to take government approved drugs for his ills during the necessary period.

I wonder what the alarmists and prohibitionists think the enhancement is?

He'll do alright and probably will win again. His animals and their training have something to do with that. There is a lot of heart there.

[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #5 posted by josephlacerenza on March 09, 2010 at 19:19:02 PT
FoM
Sports are a mental as well as physical endeavor. What if the musher had an unfair advantage because he had a good out look, a euphoric approach to the race :)

[ Post Comment ]
 
Comment #4 posted by FoM on March 09, 2010 at 18:27:19 PT
Performance Enhancing Drugs
Marijuana is not a Performance Enhancing Drug and shouldn't be considered as such in sports in my opinion.

[ Post Comment ]
 
Comment #3 posted by FoM on March 09, 2010 at 18:23:33 PT
Vincent
Did you read that mushers said he had an advantage by using marijuana and that's why he won in the past? That's why he won't use even marinol this time.

[ Post Comment ]
 
Comment #2 posted by Vincent on March 09, 2010 at 18:16:00 PT:

The Iditarod
While I admire the Iditarod race, I am disgusted with this ruling and now, I will just ignore the whole Iditarod culture. I've lost interest in it and lost any respect I had for the organizers, for implementing this garbage, and for the participants, for agreeing. If I was one of them, I would resign that sport, and I would do it in a very loud and obnoxious way. This is bull!

[ Post Comment ]
 
Comment #1 posted by FoM on March 09, 2010 at 17:38:15 PT
Just a Note
I thought long and hard about posting this article because I am personally really impressed with this race. I felt it had good points about the use of medical marijuana in sports if a person has a medical marijuana card in their state. I bet if a musher had a script for some pain medicine that would be ok.

[ Post Comment ]

  Post Comment
Name:        Password:
E-Mail:

Subject:

Comment:   [Please refrain from using profanity in your message]

Link URL:
Link Title:


Return to Main Menu


So everyone may enjoy this service and to keep it running, here are some guidelines: NO spamming, NO commercial advertising, NO flamming, NO illegal activity, and NO sexually explicit materials. Lastly, we reserve the right to remove any message for any reason!

This web page and related elements are for informative purposes only and thus the use of any of this information is at your risk! We do not own nor are responsible for visitor comments. In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107 and The Berne Convention on Literary and Artistic Works, Article 10, news clippings on this site are made available without profit for research and educational purposes. Any trademarks, trade names, service marks, or service names used on this site are the property of their respective owners. Page updated on March 09, 2010 at 17:34:08