Cannabis News DrugSense
  Drug Money
Posted by CN Staff on March 24, 2007 at 07:41:11 PT
By Jeffry Gardner 
Source: Albuquerque Tribune  

medical Santa Fe, NM -- Before we rush out and roll up a prescription reefer, let's take a look at the presidential campaign of Gov. Bill Richardson.

In arguing for the medical-marijuana bill, Richardson did a little verbal tripping of his own, telling reporters that signing legislation he's consistently opposed until now may be "risky - but it's the right thing to do." Courage under fire and all that.

But the "right thing to do"? Reports of California doctors dosing doobies for everything under the sun notwithstanding, it's far from a pipe dream to speculate that Richardson's flip-flop on this bill had less to do with its so-called safeguards than because such legislation is wildly popular in certain circles. Far left-wing circles. George "$$$" Soros circles, to be precise.

A fund-raiser here and there raising a quarter-million dollars isn't going to buy Campaign Richardson much TV in New Hampshire or Iowa. Some radio, I suppose - but, look: Soros' bank account and his interest in legalizing drugs are well-documented. His big contributions to Richardson's gubernatorial campaign were noted as well.

No, legalizing medical marijuana isn't the right thing to do. For the same reason the folks at Planned Parenthood and NARAL have fought partial-birth abortion bans, folks against legalizing drugs have fought medical-marijuana legislation - incrementalism. Once the horse sticks his nose out of the barn, well, pal, the arguments against letting that pony run free melt away like this winter's snowpack.

And let's make this understood: Soros is no humanitarian. Soros isn't concerned about the "160 people in deep pain" the governor often referred to.

Who do you think Soros hurt when he attempted to bring down the Bank of England? The Queen? Whose pensions, investments and retirement funds were crushed along the way, as Soros greedily manipulated European money markets? Paul McCartney?

It's fairly repulsive to watch America's vaunted, deeply-concerned-about-the-working-stiff-left's suck up and buy into Soros' malicious machinations for the sake of a few bucks. All right, a few million bucks.

Anyway, for a guy who has spent the past few years working on a whole new r‚sum‚ under the heading "moderate Democrat," it didn't take but a few weeks on the campaign trail for Richardson to realize he'd better shuffle back to the left and reaffirm his liberal bona fides.

Along with his new stand on medical marijuana, the governor spent great political capital reviving his domestic partners bill - the bill to give gay and straight nonmarried couples rights generally reserved for traditional couples.

Richardson hasn't changed positions on this issue, but he did work hard this past session to gain headlines fighting for the bill. It was a quieter move during his first term that brought domestic rights to state workers.

Ultimately, efforts for pot and partners are two large steps for Richardson. But will they be two giant leaps for his campaign's bank account? We'll see.

Note: Campaign funding spurred guv to push medical marijuana.

Source: Albuquerque Tribune (NM)
Author: Jeffry Gardner
Published: Saturday, March 24, 2007
Copyright: 2007 The Albuquerque Tribune
Contact: letters@abqtrib.com
Website: http://www.abqtrib.com/

Related Articles & Web Site:

Drug Policy Alliance
http://www.drugpolicy.org/

Applaud Lawmakers for Medical Pot Bill
http://cannabisnews.com/news/thread22768.shtml

Richardson To Legalize Medical Marijuana
http://cannabisnews.com/news/thread22755.shtml

Lawmakers Change Minds on Marijuana
http://cannabisnews.com/news/thread22744.shtml


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Comment #37 posted by potpal on March 27, 2007 at 06:43:06 PT
Alternate headline
And in truth... Drug -War Reform- Money

The real 'drug money' is what the pharmas are dishing out to prohibitionist politicks.

[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #36 posted by FoM on March 26, 2007 at 17:17:01 PT
Thanks The GCW
Go Gary!

[ Post Comment ]
 
Comment #35 posted by The GCW on March 26, 2007 at 16:33:06 PT
From one of the family.
http://www.madison.com/tct/opinion/letters/index.php?ntid=126069&ntpid=2

Gary Storck: Marijuana stance a plus for Richardson A letter to the editor

Dear Editor: New Mexico Gov. Bill Richardson's plans to sign a state medical marijuana bill put him head and shoulders above the front-running candidates for U.S. president in 2008.

While most other candidates refuse to show any support for suffering patients who need medical cannabis today, Richardson has aligned himself with the overwhelming majority of Americans who believe the sick should have legal access if their doctors concur.

Gary Storck, co-founder, Is My Medicine Legal YET? Madison

Published: March 26, 2007

From the Capital Times / Madison, Wisconsin

[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #34 posted by Dan B on March 26, 2007 at 08:39:36 PT
Logic, Anyone?
So, here is a paraphrase of the best argument that Jeffrey Gardner, author of the above article, could come up with against a medical marijuana bill being passed into law: If we let medical patients have access to cannabis, soon everyone will want access! Oh, and George Soros is a bad man because he figured out how to mainipulate the financial markets to his advantage, then did so. If George Soros is in favor of it, it must be bad.

He begins with a classic slippery slope fallacy, then marches right into the classic guilt by association fallacy. In short, no logic whatsoever was used in the writing of Jeffrey Gardner's article.

Great work, Mr. Gardner! You have given us yet another example of the abuse of logical thought that, without exception, characterizes every argument in favor of continuing the war on cannabis.

Brilliant.

Dan B

[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #33 posted by whig on March 25, 2007 at 16:07:47 PT
museman
Language is always imprecise; in the rave scene they use the term PLUR, which stands for Peace, Love, Unity & Respect.

[ Post Comment ]
 
Comment #32 posted by museman on March 25, 2007 at 13:07:26 PT
E_J
Fame and fortune was just as tempting a modifier of the truth in ancient Greece as it is today.

Entertainment was once pretty much exclusive to the ruling class, until they realized it could mullify the plebians. which is why we know of Homer, who understood how to kiss ass artisticly, and none of the many other poets who were perhaps stoned or hung for their much too truthful renditions. That's why the words of John Lennon are so dangerous, everything even loosely associated must be condemned by the contemporary spiritual Romans.

[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #31 posted by museman on March 25, 2007 at 12:56:16 PT
whig

What you refer to as 'just' I would simply consider 'respect.' That condition you describe (the same as mine) to me is an example of 'having' rather than 'posessing.'

How far the field of 'personal posessions' extends before it gets ridiculous and actually contributes to others lack, is perhaps the point of acceptability we are attempting to define. It is at this point a gray area, I will admit, but I believe it is important to our collective future to scrape away the dross to get at the truth.

We have a NEW future to build, based on standards and morals which have essentially been rejected by the system and it's lords. Just as you define the line between your (what should be)inviolate sanctum and the rest of the world -which by the way I believe in- as the microcosmic foundation of how you 'govern your own life' so should that apply to the macrocosm as well.

I submit that 'imminent domain' as well as 'property rights' could easily violate and disrespect your God-given right to live your life in peace, at any moment, and that is 'injustice.'



[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #30 posted by E_Johnson on March 25, 2007 at 12:44:05 PT
Oh I don't know about the Greeks
I've been listening to the Iliad in my car. Homer doesn't really explain why the Trojan War is happening. WE don't learn anything about the political and economic issues that had been brewing between Troy and Sparta before the war. Homer focuses the story on the same kind of details that any TV director would focus on when telling the story on TV today. The sex, the violence, the personality clashes -- that's what Homer focuses on. The opening spat between Achilles and Agamemnon is so bratty and mean, it almost sounds as if it came reality TV.

And then this silly idea that a ten year war was really fought over a woman, when in truth kings like Menelaus had dozens of wives and worked hard at having children with all of them. Homer already sounds like he took some real war over territory and economics and politics and dumbed it down and sexed it up for mass consumption.

[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #29 posted by afterburner on March 25, 2007 at 12:30:35 PT
museman #26 & 27
#27: Yes, I agree. The ancient Greek theatre and dramas of other cultures were designed to enlighten. The fragmentation of science and industry make fluff poetry, art and music possible.

#26: And I was going to say that too!

[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #28 posted by whig on March 25, 2007 at 12:14:12 PT
museman #23
You ask me a hard question: to define justice. It is not mine to give you an answer, but I believe it exists and perhaps I can demonstrate it by some example.

I have just power and control of my environment within my home, shared with my wife. That is to say, not only is the home shared, but so are the power and control over its interior space, where we reside with our personal items. I would not say that our power is absolute, and since we are renting we cannot claim property of this place, even were it above dispute that anyone has a right to claim ownership of land. Still, you would not have the just authority to come into our home without permission.

[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #27 posted by museman on March 25, 2007 at 12:12:07 PT
Afterburner
I agree, that the power and art of the word, begats responsibility to the wielder, yet an art like any other talent or 'power' can be used or abused.

Art in itself, or poetry in itself is not some guarantee of truth, but if the intent is there, the truth will be revealed. If confusion is there, that too will be revealed.

I believe that the original intention and purpose of art, and musical, lyrical art in particular, is to uplift, illuminate, and assist mankind.

The fact that clever arrangement of phrasing, with improbable word combinations that slide by because of meter and pleasing phonetics is considered art, is similar to considering random paint blotches as 'art.' If one gets meaning out of that, then I suppose it might be, but in those cases I tend to agree with the egoistic assessment. Vanity exemplified.

Personally I view music and art as irresponsible if it isn't making some attempt to move us forward. The Kundalini of youth also needs that beat, but that beat is so much more satisfying when the truth is attached to it. I beleive that anyway.

[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #26 posted by museman on March 25, 2007 at 11:58:05 PT
but...
"Nietzsche is dead."

-God

[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #25 posted by museman on March 25, 2007 at 11:57:32 PT
Afterburner
"God is dead."

-Nietzsche

[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #24 posted by afterburner on March 25, 2007 at 11:45:59 PT
museman - Poetry Revisted
Poets by The Tragically Hip http://tinyurl.com/2364wl

{ Spring starts when a heartbeat's pounding when the birds can be heard above the reckoning carts doing some final accounting lava flowing in Superfarmer's direction he's been getting reprieve from the heat in the frozen-food section

don't tell me what the poets are doing don't tell me that they're talking tough don't tell me that they're anti-social somehow not anti-social enough

and porn speaks to its splintered legions to the pink amid the withered cornstalks in them winter regions while aiming at the archetypal father he says with such broad and tentative swipes why do you even bother

Don't tell me what the poets are doing those Himalayas of the mind Don't tell me what the poets are doin in the long grasses over-time.

Don't tell me what the poets are doing on the street and the epitome of vague don't tell me how the universe is altered when you find out how he gets paid

if there's nothing more that you need now lawn cut by bare-breasted women beaches bleached, towels within reach for the women gotta make it that'll make it by swimming }

"The poets lie too much." -Friedrich Nietzsche, Thus Spoke Zarathustra

Don't get me wrong: I love poetry (My brother is a poet and I have written some myself), but poetry is a double-edged sword of great power. It's ability to influence the emotions allows it to be used to inspire and enlighten or to manipulate and enslave. To nurture or to dominate. Free people or controlled slaves/peasants.

ego transcendence or ego destruction, that is the question.

[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #23 posted by museman on March 25, 2007 at 10:41:24 PT
whig
"Still, there is just power and just control, and we need to have ways to differentiate it from unjust power and control."

I am curious what you would define as 'just power, and just control.' To me those words imply imposition, force, and extreme violation of free will, because the very concept of 'justice' or "just" implies and presumes the dominance and pervasion of 'injustice' which as I have pointed out is the direct result of the imbalance of propriety inflicted upon the world.

I know only one authority, and it does not reside within the hands of any men, except in the MOMENT it is needed, and to whom it is given to guide us through that moment. When the moment is over, the 'authority' defaults back to the Source, and does not remain except in false assumption. All people, and anyone is/are the authority of the moment -freed from the confusion of false value, and false delegation. The fact that most people are taught to be willing slaves to that false authority is definitely a stumbling block in the way of true human progress.

The cops got my peace pipe several years ago. They didn't seem to have any problem differentiating between having and posession, 'what's theirs is theirs, and what's mine is theirs- "IT'S THE LAW!"

But sharing the herb in healing and mutual illumination, is definitely a step in the correct direction.

I am glad we are getting there.

[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #22 posted by whig on March 25, 2007 at 10:14:38 PT
museman #19
We could talk at great length about the distortive effects of language like "property" which says nothing of reality but only human institutions to maintain power and control.

Still, there is just power and just control, and we need to have ways to differentiate it from unjust power and control.

If we tried to discuss ways of resolving it without using the wisdom of cannabis in our approach, we would fail as everyone who has tried it has failed. But with the eye of discernment that allows us to see the truth, we can know when words are being used to deceive and when they are expressed with an honest meaning behind them.

In short, you and I need to share a peace pipe someday.

[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #21 posted by museman on March 25, 2007 at 09:28:56 PT
nuevo -
:)



[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #20 posted by museman on March 25, 2007 at 09:14:25 PT
toke
Wonderful!

Made me think of a song (are you surprised?).

Not exactly the same meanings, not on the same page, but probably in the same chapter, and definitely the same book. It's an old song, and I just recorded it for the first time the other day-but it's not mastered yet, so there's just the lyrics, but...

[ Post Comment ]
 
Comment #19 posted by museman on March 25, 2007 at 09:08:43 PT
whig #10
In a sense of the meaning, there was never a time without challenge, or obstacles to overcome, life would be pretty dull and unmoving without them. There is no lack of mountains to climb, and ideas to debate, and nurture, but without the inherent imbalance of the system of 'law and propriety' the causes of destructive conflict just aren't there.

Last night in our Academy, we discussed the difference between 'having' something, and 'posessing' it. Usually I would expect a semantical argument, but 'my' students caught it instantly. Though those two words are almost always used in conjunction with each other, and considered synonymous, they can be used to describe two completely polar opposites.

Having, is like holding an object in your hand, you use it, look at it, whatever. While it is in your hand, you have it.

Posession is like grasping that object with protective attitude, not wanting to 'put it down' for fear of losing it. Taking further steps to insure that no one else 'gets it', like inventing laws and armed guards.

One can have, and share. No one shares their 'posessions.' (without some form of contract or agreement to insure it's return). What we are given to have, and use by Gods Providence, like herbs, and especially cannabis, can be shared without conditions and stipulations. Providence extends itself -in my mind- to the individual right to have equal access to all the bounty of the earth.

'Having' in the meaning I am defining, is a 'faith' based system. 'Posession' on the other hand, is fear based.

John Lennon scared a lot of (ultra) rich people with 'Imagine.'

[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #18 posted by nuevo mexican on March 25, 2007 at 08:14:24 PT
Here's something to laugh about, while we cry
about the loss of any shred of integrity in our 'leaders'.

Good Day FOM and all!

Here is a clip of Colbert calling for bush to be impeached!

Twice!

Great compilation of Colbert/Stewart clips regarding bush/gonzo!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k6W-TM6Cm1g

Guaranteed to make you smile!



[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #17 posted by FoM on March 25, 2007 at 05:56:12 PT
Sinsemilla Jones
I think that drug testing is wrong. The reason I don't believe it is something that is important is because it really is up to the parents of children to get involved in their children's school and say they don't want drug testing. It is about the children and I am concerned about adult's rights not children's rights. As long as we cater to children and let the government push " what about the children " adults will be the ones that are hurt.

[ Post Comment ]
 
Comment #16 posted by Toker00 on March 25, 2007 at 04:43:16 PT
Mirror mirror on the wall...
You know what a Republican sees when he looks in the mirror?

A Democrat.

You know what Class-ism sees when it looks in the mirror?

Racism.

You know what Corporatism sees when it looks in the mirror?

Fascism.

You know what Prohibitionists see when they look in the mirror?

The Black Market.

You know who George Bush sees when he looks in the mirror?

Adolf Hitler.

You know what our Democracy sees when it looks in the mirror? Tyranny.

What does our Constitution see when it looks in the mirror?

We The People.

What do Politicians see when they look in the mirror?

Liars.

What do Parents for a Drug Free America see when they look in the mirror?

Hypocrites.

What does John Walters see when he looks in the mirror?

A Legal Drug Lord.

What do people resisting 9-11 Truth see when they look in the mirror?

The New World Order.

Toke.



[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #15 posted by Sinsemilla Jones on March 25, 2007 at 00:51:01 PT
FoM #11
Random drug testing is wrong on so many levels, it's hard to know where to begin.

And it's really hard to know which is the worst aspect of it, because they're all so vile.

1st off, it's really not OT, because it's about the money as always. Drug testers grabbing tax money meant for education, while parents pay for books and supplies, and the kids sell candy to support the extra-curricular activities they are being drug tested to participate in.

But I always thought the worst part was the absolutely Un-American, positively nazi/commie invasion of privacy. You've done nothing for anyone to even suspect that you might be guilty, yet you have to prove your innocence by providing the state with your bodily fluids! What kind of freaking civics lesson is that?!

However, that might be matched by the fact that it encourages people who feel the need to get high to choose substances based on how they will effect their drug test, rather than how they will effect their body. It's bad enough that they teach kids that all illegal drugs are equally harmful, but since marijuana use is detectable longer than all the others, they are actually encouraging the use of drugs that can do real damage to their bodies and/or psyche.

Then there's the potentially dangerous substances and practices people take and do to try to cover the presense of illegal drugs; the fact that not being on the football team, in the school play, or employed means more time and probably more psychological motivation to do drugs; unnecessary damage done to educational and work history; etc.

Random drug testing is like the lottery - Shirley Jackson's The Lottery, with the worst fears of both George Orwell AND Ayn Rand about the government thrown in. And that's quite a feat.

[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #14 posted by gloovins on March 25, 2007 at 00:05:07 PT
OT but great vid to lift your spirits...
this goes out to all the prohibitionists whose policies ruin thousands & thousands of suffering people's lives daily...

COULD YOU BE LOVED? His children (& all of us) want to know...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FEA9dBz5rlE

[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #13 posted by afterburner on March 24, 2007 at 23:48:29 PT
Four More Voices Fight Government Hysteria
CN BC: PUB LTE: The Solution Must Surely Be Obvious, Campbell River Mirror, (21 Mar 2007) http://www.mapinc.org/newstcl/v07/n363/a02.html?176

US: Web: It's Been An 'All Out War' On Pot Smokers For 35 Years (Thu, 22 Mar 2007) AlterNet (US Web) Paul Armentano http://www.mapinc.org/drugnews/v07/n360/a07.html

CN MB: Dude, Where's My War?, Winnipeg Sun, (24 Mar 2007) Canadian [Adam Mann] Works For Israeli Pro-Pot Peace Party http://www.mapinc.org/newstcl/v07/n373/a05.html?176

CN MB: OPED: Rethinking The Trade In Sex And Drugs, Winnipeg Free Press, (23 Mar 2007) Neil Boyd is a criminologist at Simon Fraser University. http://www.mapinc.org/newstcl/v07/n371/a08.html?176

Early Neil:

Buffalo Springfield - On The Way Home lyrics http://tinyurl.com/2ywyxw

"When the dream came I held my breath with my eyes closed I went insane Like a smoke ring day when the wind blows Now I won't be back till later on If I do come back at all But you know me, and I miss you now In a strange game I saw myself as you knew me When the change came And you had a chance to see through me Though the other side is just the same You can tell my dream is real Because I love you, can you see me now Though we rush ahead to save our time We are only what we feel And I love you, can you feel it now"

[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #12 posted by potpal on March 24, 2007 at 22:45:05 PT
money money money
Upper Crust = handful of crumbs held together by a wad of dough

[ Post Comment ]
 
Comment #11 posted by FoM on March 24, 2007 at 17:30:00 PT
Off Topic: Drug Testing Article from The NYT
Is This the Answer to Drug Use?

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/03/25/nyregion/nyregionspecial2/25RDRUG.html

[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #10 posted by whig on March 24, 2007 at 16:41:56 PT
museman
Are you saying that there was a time before human conflict existed? Maybe so, but it involves lots of herbs. :)

[ Post Comment ]
 
Comment #9 posted by museman on March 24, 2007 at 16:30:20 PT
#6 whig
"How would you resolve disputes going forward, without law or equity?"

I don't subscribe to the supposition that there would necessarily be any 'disputes' to resolve in a world without 'law and equity.'

Life existed in harmony long before it was taken for a ride down property lane. It will find that harmony again, without the inventions of clever, predacious humans attempting to establish and perpetuate their rule.

[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #8 posted by mayan on March 24, 2007 at 15:58:51 PT
Sour Grapes
Reports of California doctors dosing doobies for everything under the sun notwithstanding, it's far from a pipe dream to speculate that Richardson's flip-flop on this bill had less to do with its so-called safeguards than because such legislation is wildly popular in certain circles. Far left-wing circles. George "$$$" Soros circles, to be precise.

80% of American's circles, to be even more precise.

THE WAY OUT IS THE WAY IN...

Mark Cuban Exposes O'Reilly Hypocrisy On Radio Broadcast: http://www.prisonplanet.com/articles/march2007/240307oreillyhypocrisy.htm

The Canadian Action Party calls the official 9/11 story physically impossible: http://canadianactionparty.ca/911.htm

Canadian Engineer and Scholar Question 9/11: http://911blogger.com/node/7205

What Melted Cop Cars 7 Blocks From WTC On 911? http://rense.com/general75/melt.htm

What May Have Melted The WTC Vehicles: http://rense.com/general75/melt2.htm



[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #7 posted by Had Enough on March 24, 2007 at 15:33:26 PT
Homer

Barbarians & Bureaucrats

http://www.wsu.edu/~dee/MINOA/HOMER.HTM

*******

Homer's Iliad and Odyssey are a major part of ancient history, especially that of Ancient Greece. This site, by means of a purely educational and learning mission, has put together a collaboration of materials and works by our team that we feel will help you to understand and get more out of Homer and his/her/their works.

http://library.thinkquest.org/19300/data/homer.htm

thanks museman

[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #6 posted by whig on March 24, 2007 at 12:48:32 PT
museman
How would you resolve disputes going forward, without law or equity?

[ Post Comment ]
 
Comment #5 posted by museman on March 24, 2007 at 11:29:48 PT
yes and more
" Some Roman author said that the law is a whore to the man with the biggest checkbook." probably Homer.

I say;

"The law is a whore, trained, covertly sanctioned, subsidized, and invented by the class with the biggest wad."

Rome never died, it just changed robes. It still uses the eagle as it's symbol though.

[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #4 posted by FoM on March 24, 2007 at 09:43:36 PT
Live Webcast
I don't have the real player so I won't be able to see it but hopefully some of us will.

WATCH LIVE: New Leadership On Health Care 2008 Presidential Forum

The Democratic presidential candidates are in Las Vegas today for the New Leadership on Health Care 2008 Presidential Forum. ThinkProgress is featuring exclusive streaming video. Watch it live at 9am PT/noon ET:

http://thinkprogress.org/

[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #3 posted by Had Enough on March 24, 2007 at 09:38:31 PT
What’s for Jeffery’s Dinner?

Crow!!! Hopefully.

Ultimately, efforts for pot and partners are two large steps for Richardson. But will they be two giant leaps for his campaign's bank account? We'll see.

I hope Gov. Richardson’s cup runneth over, with campaign donations

We will see Jeffery.

[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #2 posted by John Tyler on March 24, 2007 at 09:17:20 PT
changing laws
What is this guy’s problem? Money influences politics. It’s been that way forever. Some Roman author said that the law is a whore to the man with the biggest checkbook. Still is as far as I can tell. Now we are getting somebody on our side with a big checkbook and the prohibitionists are crying foul. We are just playing by the rules. If you don’t like the law, change it. Right?

[ Post Comment ]
 
Comment #1 posted by legalizeit on March 24, 2007 at 09:16:55 PT
Incrementalism indeed!
What business does this right-wing Rush wannabe have talking about incrementalism? That is exactly the tactic that the prohibs have used (and are still using) to criminalize everything under the sun. First alchol (which failed.) Then they turned to pot. Then they started by simply taxing pot and it went downhill from there, step by step. Then they went after psychedelics. And depressants. And stimulants... the list goes on and on. Now, the only legal intoxicants are the Big Two. And they're not stopping there...

Now they are trying to quash cigarette smoking - first was the bans in work places and other common indoor areas (which, as a non-smoker, I am completely fine with.) Now some states ban it in bars. And local legislation in many areas is banning it in parks and other open areas. Pretty soon, the only place to smoke will be in your home or car (and they'll be working on that, too.) They can't ban it outright, so they'll make it as hard as possible to smoke it without running afoul of the law.

And they are alive and well working on revisiting alcohol as well, incrementally stiffening DUI laws, lowering the legal limit, and making it all but impossible to legally drive after even a beer or two. MADD, which has completely lost touch with its original mission and has basically become a prohibitionist arm of state and federal legislature, has even come out in favor of total prohibition of alcohol. They can't ban it outright, so they'll make it as hard as possible to drink it without running afoul of the law.

What strikes me as funny is, this self-righteous zealot is all up in arms because pro-legalization forces are using the same tactic they have to get back what we lost. What's wrong with that? It worked well for them; it should work the other way as well. Pushing now for all-out across-the-board legalization of pot nationwide is futile; there are too many snob noses with their heads in the sand still in Congress and the White House for that to happen soon. That's why battles are being fought and won on smaller battlefields. Inch by inch, the war as a whole will eventually be won when the people wake up and see the line of crap they've been fed the last 70 years for what it is.

Why not use incrementalism to our advantage? It's giving the prohibs a taste of their own medicine!

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