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  Sheriff and Deputies Charged in Drug Trafficking
Posted by CN Staff on November 03, 2006 at 06:32:50 PT
By Fredrick Kunkle, Washington Post Staff Writer 
Source: Washington Post 

DEA Virginia -- The longtime sheriff of Henry County, Va., and 12 former and current deputies have been charged with participating in a drug-trafficking ring in the rural county on the North Carolina border, Drug Enforcement Agency officials said yesterday.

Harold F. Cassell, 68, who has been sheriff since 1992, was alerted to the illegal activity but did nothing to stop it, instead making false statements and aiding in money laundering to cover it up, federal officials said.

Twenty people, including sworn officers, employees and associates of officers, dealt in illegal drugs, including cocaine, crack, steroids, ketamine and hundreds of pounds of marijuana, over a five-year period beginning in 1998, federal officials said. Participants in the conspiracy also trafficked in seized weapons, including a machine gun, according to a 48-count indictment returned Wednesday in Abingdon and unsealed yesterday.

"The accusations are very serious, and we're taking them seriously. He's presumed innocent," said Cassell's attorney, John E. Lichtenstein. "He has a great deal of faith, both personal and religious."

Cassell, who goes by Frank, patrolled Henry County for years as a state trooper before becoming sheriff. He has been married for 44 years and has two daughters and several grandchildren, Lichtenstein said.

The mayor of Martinsville, which has about 15,500 residents and is the county seat, said people were distressed by the allegations. The sheriff's office, with 122 employees, including 96 sworn officers, is the primary law enforcement agency in Henry, which has no county police department.

"Without question, there is a lot of talking, and more than a little disbelief, and I think there's a lot of disappointment," said Mayor Kimble Reynolds Jr. The mayor, who is a defense lawyer, said he had heard courthouse whispers about "strong-willed personalities bumping heads" inside Cassell's department but never any word that deputies might be engaged in illicit activity.

DEA officials said a major break came in March 2005 during a large investigation, dubbed Operation Cyber Chase, into illegal online prescription drug sales.

While investigating more than 200 Web sites that illegally sold drugs around the world, DEA agents intercepted an express mail package containing 2 kilograms of ketamine, an animal tranquilizer known as Special K, that was shipped to a Henry residence, the indictment says.

DEA agents set up a sting for its intended recipient, who told them he was working as a middleman for Sgt. James A. Vaught of the sheriff's office, the indictment says. The middleman said the residence was used for drug deals and extramarital affairs, the indictment says. From there, federal agents built a case against 20 people, including the former head of the vice unit in the sheriff's office.

Cassell, who lives in Axton, allegedly agreed not to pursue investigations and to pass on tips of outside law enforcement activity to the conspirators. He also cosigned a loan for Vaught to help launder $10,000 in drug proceeds that Vaught received, federal officials said.

Vaught, 33, of Ridgway, resigned from the sheriff's office in March 2005 and agreed to cooperate with state and federal investigators, the indictment says.

Cassell has a reputation as a seasoned sheriff who runs his office in a blunt-talking, no-nonsense fashion.

The news comes as the region struggles with the loss of textile and furniture-making jobs and with recent attention from the national news media over a massive mortgage fraud case involving a Martinsville native. The nation's largest home lender recently filed suit, saying that Robert Penn, a Martinsville native who now lives in Indianapolis, tricked dozens of Virginia residents into purchasing Indiana homes at inflated prices.

"We're trying to battle back against the current," Reynolds said.

Staff researcher Meg Smith contributed to this report

Complete Title: Sheriff and Several Deputies Charged in Drug Trafficking

Source: Washington Post (DC)
Author: Fredrick Kunkle, Washington Post Staff Writer
Published: Friday, November 3, 2006; B06
Copyright: 2006 Washington Post
Contact: letterstoed@washpost.com
Website: http://www.washingtonpost.com/

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Comment #64 posted by whig on November 05, 2006 at 11:53:10 PT
Hope
Once you have a yeast you can make many things. Yeast itself is predominantly protein.

[ Post Comment ]
 
Comment #63 posted by Hope on November 05, 2006 at 11:26:41 PT
Whig
How about a great low carb bread for those of us who have to watch carbs?

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Comment #62 posted by Hope on November 05, 2006 at 11:24:26 PT
It's powerful enough to change time and space.
Lol!

That's some pretty powerful bread there, Whig!

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Comment #61 posted by jasgrave333 on November 05, 2006 at 08:33:35 PT:

eXactly! - well said!
" This is the politics of contraband in action. Money, power, and opportunity lead to corruption whether it is Dogpatch U.S.A. or D.C. "

Money corrupts... "The love of money", being at the root of ALL evil... (1 Tim 6:10)

(didn't Jesus make a hemp rope whip, to cast out the money changers from the temple...?)

Yes it's greed ruling these things... definately!

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Comment #60 posted by John Tyler on November 05, 2006 at 08:14:29 PT
trouble in Dogpatch
This article is what people have been saying all along. The lure of easy money has a very strong appeal. This is the politics of contraband in action. Money, power, and opportunity lead to corruption whether it is Dogpatch U.S.A. or D.C.

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Comment #59 posted by FoM on November 04, 2006 at 18:28:43 PT
Whig
I understand. I tried to do that on New Years Eve one time and CNews was behind by about 10 minutes. That's why I know.

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Comment #58 posted by whig on November 04, 2006 at 17:57:07 PT
FoM
I'm not worried about the time, I just wanted to see whether what I wrote was at 4:20, so I was calculating the adjustment. I'm off about a minute too, and my clock here is network time.

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Comment #57 posted by FoM on November 04, 2006 at 16:51:18 PT
Whig
I'm only one minute off. That's close for me.

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Comment #56 posted by FoM on November 04, 2006 at 16:50:20 PT
Whig
The time on CNews has always been off. Maybe if you asked Matt he might fix it.

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Comment #55 posted by whig on November 04, 2006 at 16:24:37 PT
4:20
Time check -- now 4:25 here, are we off?

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Comment #54 posted by whig on November 04, 2006 at 16:22:00 PT
Hope
I'm eating a handful of bread right now. It's powerful enough to change time and space. If anyone needs help making bread ask me, I'm very pleased and do not want to keep this for myself at all.

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Comment #53 posted by Hope on November 04, 2006 at 15:31:22 PT
Coffee with a bit of bit of whipped cream...
My treat...this minute. Pretty good.

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Comment #52 posted by Hope on November 04, 2006 at 15:26:42 PT
No Havla
But I've got my diet rootbeer...and with a spoonful of cow's cream or a squirt of sugar free whipped cream...I have a fizzy rootbeer float.

I've got my diet jello and my sugar free whipped cream.

I can eat almonds without the activity aroused by sesame seeds and honey. I'm glad of that.

Trouble is, havla is so good, that I can't eat just a little, so I don't know if just a teaspoonful or two would cause it or not.

So I avoid it.

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Comment #51 posted by Hope on November 04, 2006 at 15:21:28 PT
I cannot eat the havla much.
It tends to "get lively" as it digests.

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Comment #50 posted by Hope on November 04, 2006 at 15:20:37 PT
MMM....sounds good.
"Like yogurt with active bacteria cultures, a sourdough bread has active yeast."

Gimme some a that bread!

I really, really like live whole milk yogurt. Mmmmmm!

Havla. I love to eat the Havla.

YumYumYum.

:0)

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Comment #49 posted by Hope on November 04, 2006 at 15:16:30 PT
Yeast, Cultures, sour dough, yogurt.
I've made them all. Including kiefer. I like them all and I think they are all likely quite good for one's digestive system.

Although, yeast can be a gut disturbing experience. One time my Fresian son-in-law made olle bolen or something... like a fried, sugar covered, risen yeast donut...only it was just the hole part...it was balls...bigger than your average donut hole.

Anyway...he got rushed and didn't let the yeast rise enough and rushed and cooked them. They rose in us...his guests and him. It was pretty amazing. Plentiful servings of beer and wine along with them, made it even more amusing.

I attended a Catholic service as a child and was allowed to accept that wafer with the picture on it and all. Only back then...we didn't kneel in Baptist Churches and Methodist and Presbyterian churches. I complained about the kneeling on the unpadded board for an hour and a woman told me, "If Jesus could hang on the cross three days for you, you can worship on your knees for one hour."

In Baptist, Methodist, and Presbyterian churches I shared communion in, we got broken crackers and grape juice.

It meant the same thing...even if it wasn't the exact species common in the days of the first Christians.

It's odd, but the bread and wine ceremony, called "communion" by many, always made me feel peaceful and happy.

Anyway.

Although I didn't get especially upset about the pastor we had feeling the way he did about it...I still missed it, especially after watching others take it and not being allowed to.



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Comment #48 posted by whig on November 04, 2006 at 14:42:06 PT
Live cultures do not die when eaten
I wanted to say more. You do not kill your food, you absorb it. Yogurt culture changes the whole chemistry of your stomach, as the bacteria takes up beneficial residence -- it is a symbiote.

So is the yeast.

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Comment #47 posted by whig on November 04, 2006 at 14:40:33 PT
A little more scientific explanation...
As I said before, you are what you eat, and this is true as a matter of simple biology. You eat food which replenishes your cells and forms the raw material by which they grow and replace their wastes.

You can eat living food or dead food, if you eat food which is completely dead it will give you no energy, but food which still has any life gives you some energy. This is a hard concept for people who see life and death as binary. When you pluck a flower, the flower does not die immediately. You can place it in some water and it may even grow new roots. At some point it is too dry to bring back in that way, but as long as there is any green there is life.

Bread can be living bread, with living yeast. When you bake at a low enough temperature for a short time, the crust that forms will protect the interior of the bread. Like yogurt with active bacteria cultures, a sourdough bread has active yeast.

This is not just a metaphor, this is true.

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Comment #46 posted by whig on November 04, 2006 at 12:58:54 PT
Hope
Nope. If the bread does not rise there is no yeast. You can't just imagine the yeast. It is real.

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Comment #45 posted by FoM on November 04, 2006 at 12:05:30 PT
Hope
I had to partake of Communion ( after going to Confession ) all the time and it never meant anything to me. We were even told not to chew the Host or we would be chewing Jesus. Talk about freaking me out as a young child. Communion to me is talking to God while all alone and quietly.

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Comment #44 posted by Hope on November 04, 2006 at 11:51:06 PT
Besides
Not being Catholic...I don't have a eucharist. I don't think I do, anyway.

I'm not big into ceremonies, but I have been, it seemed to me, blessed by the Communion and Baptism ceremonies.

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Comment #43 posted by Hope on November 04, 2006 at 11:48:51 PT
That particular bread
was Bread...in our hearts and spirits and minds...it represented Christ's body...that he gave...to put an end to all sacrifice...for us.

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Comment #42 posted by Hope on November 04, 2006 at 11:47:05 PT
The Spirit of that bread....
was from He that I know as I Am That I Am and Jeshua/Jesus.

Is leavening a "spirit"...or "dope", to add to flour to make nice bread?

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Comment #41 posted by Hope on November 04, 2006 at 11:44:49 PT
Eucharist
If I want it to be?

For me, it is.

Right?

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Comment #40 posted by whig on November 04, 2006 at 11:36:55 PT
Hope
If the bread does not rise it is not eucharist.

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Comment #39 posted by Hope on November 04, 2006 at 11:34:32 PT
Whig
The bread I made was pretty nice.

Firmer than a pancake or tortilla, but sort of like a big, laid out, failed to rise bisquit.

We had it while it was still warm, too, which made it NOT hard tack...unless there is such a thing as freshly made hardtack. Hardtack is hard.

[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #38 posted by whig on November 04, 2006 at 11:33:24 PT
Communion
It is for everyone now.

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Comment #37 posted by whig on November 04, 2006 at 11:32:42 PT
Hope
Your pastor passed on the knowledge that he had been given, and how it has been passed along for thousands of years. When there is no bread, there is only the word. The word is the recipe, and the recipe is what makes the word flesh.

Christ is in the bread, this is his body, and he is risen.

[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #36 posted by Hope on November 04, 2006 at 11:30:47 PT
I guess
we were a peculiar family.



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Comment #35 posted by Hope on November 04, 2006 at 11:28:24 PT
Why we did it.
Our pastor didn't believe in the ceremony of Communion. He said the bread and the wine were the book.

The other church we went to...we went to another one on Wednesday nights and Sunday nights, didn't allow people who were not members to participate in their Communion.

So we had our own.

[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #34 posted by whig on November 04, 2006 at 11:28:02 PT
Hope
Unleavened bread can be very good. Leavening takes time. Obtaining the yeast takes days, at least, and depends on your environment.

Here in Berkeley and in the San Francisco area, yeast is plentiful and makes delicious bread. We are known for our sourdough, after all.

In the desert it may be years and no yeast. Think about that. 40 years, maybe.

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Comment #33 posted by Hope on November 04, 2006 at 11:26:18 PT
Oil
Yep...thinking about that unleavened bread I made, may have had olive oil in it.

I don't remember. I just remember that it was simple and plain and had no artificial leavening...other than what baking might provide.

We had a family "Communion" with it and wine.

It was sweet, spiritally. For some reason, we all broke into a glorious smile when we placed the bread in our mouths. All of us, on our knees, simultaneously.

It was neat...and sweet.

[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #32 posted by whig on November 04, 2006 at 11:11:36 PT
Toker00
You get it, yes.

I preferred to use organic unbleached wheat for a starter, it's easier to get going. You need to mix a little bit of olive oil and honey and mix your herbs with that in order to make it more accessible to the yeast. A little bit of sea salt finely ground may be used, don't use iodized salt, and use no metal utensils or containers for your starter. I recommend using freshly distilled or at least purified water as well.

You can always vary your ingredients when you bake a loaf of bread and see how well it works. My second loaf was made with some organic spelt flour -- a very ancient grain that may have been used two thousand years ago.

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Comment #31 posted by Toker00 on November 04, 2006 at 10:59:34 PT
Whig, Hope
Kool. We should all be making bread using hemp flower, and properly STONED yeast. Wouldn't it be more nutritious than wheat flower? I have got to find a hemp store. There's something about this making bread I'm not getting, and I want to. Experience being the best teacher. Living bread. I get that part. I didn't know about yeast forming DNA and protein and stuff. And you get the yeast STONED with the cannabis seed flower and they really get into doing that DNA thing and...Pppphhhtttt...ok I get it now. :)

Toke.

[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #30 posted by Hope on November 04, 2006 at 10:46:10 PT
Whig
You're communicating on a higher plane than I can discern.

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Comment #29 posted by Hope on November 04, 2006 at 10:43:41 PT
palatable
saw platable as it was posting.

Tastes better and is more pleasant to consume.

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Comment #28 posted by Hope on November 04, 2006 at 10:42:45 PT
Toker
"Does leavening just adds air and puffiness to bread?"

Yes. Basically, with it's little explosions of gases and chemicals, it levitates the gooey stuff....puffs it with air, lifts it...makes it appear to grow. Makes it more of a delicacy than the basic unleavened wheat or corn bread, and renders it more tender and platable.

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Comment #27 posted by whig on November 04, 2006 at 10:18:18 PT
Toker00
A true yeast does not just create air. It is a living organism that builds strands of protein and DNA and everything. It is nutritionally different from commercial bread.

A yeast which has been well and properly stoned is something even more interesting.

[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #26 posted by whig on November 04, 2006 at 10:13:45 PT
Hope
The old testament was a story of a people who lost their bread, when they fled the land of egypt.

The new testament is a story of its restoration.

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Comment #25 posted by whig on November 04, 2006 at 10:11:00 PT
Hope
I stored mine. It is for everyone.

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Comment #24 posted by Hope on November 04, 2006 at 10:09:59 PT
"ike a hard biscuit?"
Only mine was thinner ...like a thicker tortilla. It was edible. Flour, water...maybe salt, to the right constistency. Knead. Pat. Bake slowly on cookie sheet or in pan.

Whig, I'm thinking of the manna that rained on the children of Israel in the desert...and they were to gather it for food...but not try to store any of it.

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Comment #23 posted by whig on November 04, 2006 at 10:04:36 PT
Toker00
Bread can be leavened by artificial means, the "badking soda" and a little vinegar will create air pockets that inflate a loaf very quickly and consistently. This is your standard commercial bread.

A sourdough is a living organism, it is yeast which fell upon a moist soil of good flour and water. A yeast makes living bread.

[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #22 posted by whig on November 04, 2006 at 10:00:35 PT
Hope
I have manna bread.

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Comment #21 posted by Toker00 on November 04, 2006 at 06:21:21 PT
Hope
So it turns out, basically, like a hard biscuit? Does leavening just adds air and puffiness to bread? Makes it easier to eat? They must put a LOT of leavening in Commercial Bakery bread. An air filler. What is the nutritional difference?

Whig, where do you pick up this manna from Heaven? Also, was Christ able to make more bread by adding leavening to feed all those people? Or did he use this Manna that fell from Heaven? I'm confused. I'm going to read about baking bread.

Toke.

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Comment #20 posted by Hope on November 04, 2006 at 06:07:11 PT
badking powder
Scary stuff...that "Badking" powder.

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Comment #19 posted by Hope on November 04, 2006 at 05:35:26 PT
Unleavened Bread
I thought it was bread without leavening...or yeast, or soda, or badking powder.

I've made it before. What I made was very like or may have been exactly what Dad called "Hard Tack".

The Jewish people, in the desert, were told not to save any of the manna, bread from heaven, because it would spoil. So they couldn't use manna in bread making.

Where is your information coming from, Whig?

I disagree...but you may be right.

[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #18 posted by whig on November 04, 2006 at 01:32:43 PT
FoM
Please delete #17.

[ Post Comment ]
 
Comment #16 posted by user123 on November 03, 2006 at 20:56:40 PT:

All the same
From Politicians, to Evangelicals to cops, they're all hypocrites.

[ Post Comment ]
 
Comment #15 posted by Wayne on November 03, 2006 at 19:44:23 PT
living vicariously
I love it when the so-called "righteous" get called out on their transgressions. And I am not ashamed to revel in their misfortune.

They could be representatives, governors, police officers, religious leaders... it doesn't really matter to me. When you make a living off of appearing to be right and just and a defender of the people and their rights--and then you get caught red-handed making a complete 180--I will take pleasure in it, and I will let people know it.

I am taking pleasure in all of this right now. Because vengeance is God's, this is something that I have always believed strongly. When you act as a wolf, and hide in sheep's clothing, God will eventually call down the thunder on you. And it is because of this belief that I have faith that someday, in my lifetime, cannabis will be re-legalized. And cannabis is one of God's wonderful creations. 70 years is a long time to endure injustice, but it really is a drop in the ocean of eternity. Man's flimsy laws cannot possibly endure the power that is God's alone.

Here's to cannabis, and all of the benefits and possibilities that it holds. And a lesson for those unfortunate elected officials and LEOs as of late: 'To thine own self be true.' God be praised!

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Comment #14 posted by whig on November 03, 2006 at 19:12:30 PT
Toker00
Unleavened bread is bread without manna.

Manna is what falls from the sky.

Yeast of life, which knows cannabis.

Make bread, feed the world.

[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #13 posted by FoM on November 03, 2006 at 19:02:03 PT
Toker00
I know what you mean. I believe honesty is the best policy. If a person like this minister is Gay then be Gay and be honest. I feel very sorry for his wife and children. I do not blame the man who spoke up because he saw the double standard and it really upset him. Do as I say but not as I do just doesn't work. It never has and it never will and when young children see this happening that don't understand and can become very bitter and rebel.

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Comment #12 posted by Toker00 on November 03, 2006 at 18:58:07 PT
Had (more than) Enough
(It would seem that not only have we chosen to ignore an elephant standing in the living room of our collective awareness, but we have chosen to cover him over with nondescript upholstery and now regard him as part of the furniture.)

Yep. The sheep have sit and lain all over it, even repairing any holes which might reveal his presence. But there's a Great Day Coming. When all things will be as they really are, and we shall see what is there and not the illusions that surround us now.

Toke.

[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #11 posted by Toker00 on November 03, 2006 at 18:50:52 PT
Whig
What is unleavened bread? I could find out myself, but I want you to put your twist to it.

Thanks. Every one of us sees how simple it is. What the problems are. What we need to do to begin to Heal. We are becoming a Mountain. The anti's and the neo-cons started chipping away at us when we were just a mole hill. Now look! They are afraid of an avalanche. With each stubborn neo-chip, that avalanche gets closer. The mountain of Truth will devour them, unless they cease the chipping and begin the climb up this mountain.

Toke.

[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #10 posted by Toker00 on November 03, 2006 at 18:38:38 PT
FoM
It does seem to be by design, doesn't it? They make the laws which they enforce on us, but then break at will themselves. They destroy and kill and maim for Empire but proclaim it in the name of Freedom and Democracy. Whose Freedom, and what Democracy? We are (were) a constitutionally protected Democracy, (the MAJORITY of us DON'T want war), which provides for protection of the minorities from a cruel majority, but no protection of the majority from a cruel Minority. Or a single Tyrannical "President". It's time to once again make let the Majority rule. That's US.

Toke.

[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #9 posted by whig on November 03, 2006 at 17:55:08 PT
Toker00 #3
I considered posting that outright to the blog. Well said. Sometimes the most powerful statements are best left here, for the true believers to find.

[ Post Comment ]
 
Comment #8 posted by whig on November 03, 2006 at 17:50:35 PT
potpal
Since this is the second, five more is the sabbath.

[ Post Comment ]
 
Comment #7 posted by whig on November 03, 2006 at 16:38:09 PT
See the world change
Who eats the bread of creation shall remake the world in his image. Make bread and share.

[ Post Comment ]
 
Comment #6 posted by whig on November 03, 2006 at 16:35:00 PT
A second day of the week
And the ninth day of creation is well underway.

http://tinyurl.com/sufv8

How crooked you've made your thin blue line.

http://tinyurl.com/y4fy5m

[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #5 posted by FoM on November 03, 2006 at 15:35:28 PT
Toker00
Every person should be able to be honest about their lives without fear of hate and being shunned by society. Can you imagine one of us here being a DEA agent and praising marijuana's helpful benefits and then trying to bust people? I don't have the words to say how bad that is to me. I think the religious right and the republican party are driving people crazy!

[ Post Comment ]
 
Comment #4 posted by Had Enough on November 03, 2006 at 15:35:27 PT
re : #3

Well I guess that about sums it up. Can’t think of a thing to add at this time.

Maybe a Cut & Paste from an earlier post…

At this point, given the abysmal levels of mass ignorance, self-deception and delusion at large, are we Americans even up to the task? Or has our pervasive disconnect from civic life deteriorated to such an extent that a majority of us are even capable of apprehending the dire circumstances confronting the nation? (It would seem that not only have we chosen to ignore an elephant standing in the living room of our collective awareness, but we have chosen to cover him over with nondescript upholstery and now regard him as part of the furniture.)

Nor am I coming from a lofty moral plane on this one: I'm coming from a pounding upon the ground despair -- a scanning the line of the horizon searching for any signs of hope desperation -- a shaking my fist at the indifferent sky rage.@

Link from gw

http://www.countercurrents.org/us-rockstroh021106.htm

[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #3 posted by Toker00 on November 03, 2006 at 15:12:20 PT
What's wrong with America?
Wow. Our politicians, and their Religious advisers, are having homosexual sex with our children under the guise of Christian Morality, our corporations are killing our young adults for profit and empire, our president has taken away our Bill of Rights and his cronies have all collectively wiped their behinds with the constitution and international treaties. Our children's future is being shipped overseas, our intelligence agencies training enemies to sell war for those who profit from it. Pharmaceutical medicines have become injury and death inducing at obscene profits, doctors finding endless treatments and few cures, and policemen who lock up peaceful cannabis users sell hard drugs to our children who they taught in school to just say no. Nine Republicans in Kansas running as Democrats. Our military radiating the Middle East with Uranium while threatening a peaceful Nuclear Energy power with Nuclear Annihilation. 9-11 Truthers labeled 9-11 Deniers, by the Deniers of the 9-11 Truth. Life giving science shunned for evidence lacking theologies supporting death and the destruction of Creation. Are these Truths, or am I going Mad?

Although I have no problem with homosexual sex, I think you should at least be honest and up front about it and not hide behind politics or religion. It's the Hypocrisy, stupid!

Wage Peace on war. END CANNABIS PROHIBITION NOW!

[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #2 posted by potpal on November 03, 2006 at 07:47:57 PT
Cops= Bad boys
Could it be their eyes are wide open and they be just as corrupt/able.

It is something that needs much more exposure. Prohibition corrupts...leos, military, judges, politicians. We're not to believe these guys are untouchables.

What's the world gonna be like 5 days from now?

[ Post Comment ]

 
Comment #1 posted by FoM on November 03, 2006 at 07:09:20 PT
Police Corruption
Will politicians see that corruption controls much of the drug war now? I doubt it but I wish it would open their eyes.

[ Post Comment ]

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